stall walking

Horses May Show Stress In Unusual Ways

Horses are prey animals whose flight response is deeply ingrained in their DNA. Because of this, most horses are reactive to unfamiliar sights and sounds, despite domestication. However, most horses adapt to new environments quickly as they learn that what they perceived as stressful is no longer a threat. Some horses, however, do not adjust […]

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Are Horses That Crib Cognitively Impaired?

Stereotypic behavior in horses, like cribbing, weaving or stall walking, has previously been believed to present in horses that experienced a combination of less-than-ideal living conditions and that had a genetic predisposition. A popular hypothesis stated that animals that took part in stereotypic behaviors are less cognitively flexible and therefore less equipped to deal with […]

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Possible Link Between Selenium And Cribbing In Horses

Stereotypic behaviors such as weaving, cribbing, and stall-walking occur commonly in high-performance horses as well as many companion horses. In addition to being unsightly, potentially damaging to the barn, and raising welfare concerns, stereotypic behaviors also result in important health issues such as dental disorders, temporohyoid joint damage, poor performance, weight loss, and colic. “Cribbing is the […]

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Possible Link Between Selenium and Cribbing In Horses

Stereotypic behaviors such as weaving, cribbing, and stall-walking occur commonly in high-performance horses as well as many companion horses. In addition to being unsightly, potentially damaging to the barn, and raising welfare concerns, stereotypic behaviors also result in important health issues such as dental disorders, temporohyoid joint damage, poor performance, weight loss, and colic. “Cribbing is the […]

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Stall Vices Linked To Digestive Discomfort In Horses

Horses evolved wandering miles each day and grazing in herds. Now, many horses lead a very different life, spending most of their time in stalls, eating two large meals a day, and having little contact with other horses. This shift from migratory foraging to stationary meal-eating can cause disturbances in health and behavior. For example, long-term […]

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