horse behavior

Doc’s Products, Inc. Presents How To Fix: The Hard-To-Catch Horse

In this month’s edition of How To Fix, we ask the experts for their solutions for horses who don’t like being caught in the pasture. Any horse owner or farm worker has been through the cat-and-mouse game before, whether with a young horse or an adult, and it takes a lot of time and energy. […]

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Study: Some Aspiring Veterinarians Struggle To Correctly Interpret Equine Behavior

Though the role of an equine veterinarian is to help horses, a good understanding of their behavior is key. However, a new study has shown that some vet students misinterpret equine behavior, reports The Horse. Some students even perceived the horse’s emotional state to be the exact opposite of what was actually being displayed. This […]

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Doc’s Products, Inc. Presents How To Fix: Horses That Lug Out

In this month’s edition of How To Fix, we ask the experts for their solutions to horses who lug out during racing or morning work. It’s not uncommon for a green horse to struggle in an attempt to maintain a straight path or for a horse to spook at something to his or her left […]

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Owners’ Groom Elite Program Scheduled For July 10-14, Sept. 25-29 At Santa Anita

The Elite Program Inc., through its Groom Elite programming, is excited to announce a unique opportunity for owners of racehorses to receive the same instruction that has been taught to over 3,000 grooms, inmates and others since 2001. Owners Groom Elite Session I will be conducted at Santa Anita Park July 10-14 followed by Session […]

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Give Us Some Lip: Lip Twitching More Humane Than Ear Twitching

A recent study indicates that a lip twitch, where a horse’s lip is placed in a clamp (either with a metal twitch or a rope twitch) to subdue it, is more humane than an ear twitch, where the ear is twisted in an attempt to redirect the horse’s attention. The key is not using the […]

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Can You Hear Me Now? Computers Tell Us What Horses Really Think

British researchers are working on software that would allow horses to tell humans what they are thinking and feeling. Lead by computer scientist Dr. Steve North, a research fellow in the University of Nottingham’s Mixed Reality Laboratory, the animal-computer interaction software identifies horse behavior from video so humans can interpret each animal’s reactions and understand […]

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Chestnut Horses Aren’t All Crazy, Study Finds

Most people have heard the stereotype that redheads have bad tempers–and some people believe this about red-colored horses, as well. However, European scientists recently debunked this myth, reports The Horse. Research shows that there is no scientific basis behind the long-held belief that chestnut horses are fierier. The researchers fear that the stereotype may even endanger […]

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A Horse With A Sense Of Humor? Treading The Line Between ‘Funny’ And ‘Dangerous’

Horses have very distinct personalities, and most owners have at least one story about their equine counterpart doing something silly to keep himself entertained. Though people tend to apply human emotions to their horse’s actions, equine behavior experts have determined that horses often do exhibit actions humans would characterize as funny. Horses come by some […]

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Study: Horses Use Each Others’ Ears Position, Gazes To Communicate

A recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Sussex has unearthed new details about what types of facial cues horses use to communicate with each other. Though it’s not news that horses use flying feet and teeth to express disapproval in the field, scientists were surprised to learn how strongly ears and gazes influenced […]

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Study: ‘The Eyes (and Ears) Have It’ When It Comes to Equine Behavior

A new University of Sussex study has shown that horses use a variety of visual cues to work out what may be going on in a stablemate’s head. And one of the most important factors for communication is the direction of a horse’s ears. Mammal communication experts Jennifer Wathan and Professor Karen McComb, whose paper […]

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