The Horse

What Makes Horses Unhappy?

While no scientific studies have been done as to why some farms and living situations make horses anxious and upset, it’s abundantly clear that individual horses tend to care for a specific type of facility and care. While an owner may never be able to pinpoint what caused the horse’s distress, it oftentimes is easier […]

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East Meets West: Adding Acupuncture To Traditional Laminitis Treatments May Help

Acupuncture used in conjunction with traditional modalities may improve results on laminitic equines, a new study shows. A painful disease of the hoof, laminitis causes the laminae that connect the interior structure of the hoof and the hoof wall to die, and potentially cause the hoof capsule to detach. Dr. Kevin May, of El Cajon […]

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Painful Parody: Plethora Of Other Issues Can Mimic Colic Symptoms

The signs of colic are well-known to many horse owners: abdominal discomfort shown by pawing, kicking at the belly, repeatedly rolling, sweating and increased heart and respiration rate. While these symptoms are all rightfully red flags, they are not only signs of abdominal distress; they may also be signs of pain in almost any other […]

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Teaching Overzealous Equines When To Wait

Many horses, once they understand a desired behavior, will become a bit overzealous about trying to offer the right answer all the time—even when they’re not asked. This is a natural part of the learning process. For example, horses that are taught “carrot stretches,” where they turn their head to reach over each flank and […]

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Be Skeptical Of Equine Supplement Claims

There are literally tens of thousands of equine supplements on the market, but does each live up to its claim? Equine nutritionist Clair Thunes, PhD, recommends being open-minded, yet skeptical, when evaluating what a supplement can do for an equine, reports The Horse. Using a fictional supplement to look critically at what the product claims […]

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The Dos and Don’ts Of Medicating Pregnant Mares

A veterinarian should always be involved when determining what, if any, medications a pregnant mare should receive, as few drugs have been fully evaluated for this use. However, it is suggested that many common drugs are safe for use in pregnant mares. Dr. Margo Macpherson, DVM and professor at the University of Florida’s College of […]

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Diatomaceous Earth Not A Substitute For Chemical Dewormers

With the ongoing concern over equine parasite’s resistance to dewormers, horse owners and caretakers are always on the lookout for other options to keep worms at bay. Diatomaceous earth has been used for years as a dewormer for livestock. When ingested, the diatomaceous earth, which is a silica-rich powder, supposedly slices through the worm’s exoskeletons […]

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Can Horses Hydrate From Snow? Yes, But…

Providing clean, unfrozen water in the winter can be difficult for equine caretakers, but access to water at all times helps prevent health issues like impaction colic. Though horses may like to nibble snow, the vast majority of horses cannot meet its water intake needs from snow alone, reports The Horse. A Norwegian study used Icelandic […]

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Head Tilt Could Indicate Inner Ear Issue

While some horses are difficult to bridle because they’re getting used to a new bit or a new way of handling, resistance to being bridled and a head tilt may be indicative the horse has an issue with the ear, mouth or skull, reports The Horse. A true head tilt means that the horse’s poll […]

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Q and A: How To Feed An Underweight Horse

In a recent question and answer column on TheHorse.com, a reader asked veterinarian Dr. Clair Thunes, PhD about the best ways to put weight on an off-track Thoroughbred she recently adopted. The horse, says the reader, is selective in what it wants to eat and is generally disinterested in hay and pellets. Thunes, who is […]

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