New York Times story on horse racing

N.Y. Times: Records show I’ll Have Another had history of ailments

According to an article in today’s New York Times, I’ll Have Another had various physical ailments that his connections were dealing with well before he was withdrawn from the Belmont Stakes (gr. I) on the eve of the race. He was being treated with painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs even as excitement built for his bid […]

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Hemingway wrote about ‘mangled horses’, maimed jockeys long before NY Times story

Sid Fernando writes that long before the New York Times article on ‘mangled horses’ and drugs in horse racing, the topic was covered author Ernest Hemingway, who wrote a story in France in 1922 based on the real-life story of Ksar. Hemingway changed the horse’s name to Kzar. In his story, Kzar lost a race […]

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New York Times: Derby win brings O’Neill’s record to the spotlight

In the third in a series of pieces on horse racing, the New York Times looks at Kentucky Derby-winning trainer Doug O’Neill’s record concerning drug violations and horses with “a tendency to break down.”  Last summer, O’Neill was sanctioned in California for a drug violation at Hollywood Park. In 2010, O’Neill was fined $1,000 and […]

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NHBPA responds to New York Times article assertions

The National Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association (“NHBPA”) has been representing the interests of horsemen, horsewomen, and horse racing in North America since 1940. There are over 30,000 owner and trainer members of the NHBPA throughout the United States and Canada focused on a common goal: the betterment of horse racing on all levels and […]

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New York Times: Big claiming purses lead to sore runners and breakdowns

In the second part of an investigation into horse racing, the New York Times looks at how casinos at tracks have impacted purses and the health of horses running at those tracks. The prime example, the Times writes, is racing this past winter at Aqueduct.  According to the paper’s statistics, horses broke down or showed […]

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Commentary: Junk Horse Science and the New York Times

In the interest of presenting different perspectives on issues of importance to the Thoroughbred industry, the following commentary was submitted by Mel Moser, who examined the recent article in the New York Times on horse racing (“Mangled Horses, Maimed Jockeys: Death and Disarray at America’s Racetracks”) and the statistics supporting the article.   Moser is […]

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Congress schedules subcommittee hearing on horse racing

UPDATE: The following statement was added to the hearing notice for Monday’s Congressional hearing on horse racing by the Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health. “Horseracing is a $40 billion industry that generates roughly 400,000 domestic jobs nationwide. Many question whether the widespread use of performance enhancing drugs on race day is threatening […]

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NYRA asserts New York Times analysis of racing incidents is faulty

The New York Racing Association, Inc. (NYRA) challenges the analysis of horse injuries put forth by the New York Times in their front page article published on Sunday, March 25. The Times developed a metric for the article referred to as an “incident rate,” defined as the number of times a set of terms (see […]

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New York Times defends research

In an article to be published on April 7, the Thoroughbred Times addressed the New York Times article published on March 25. The Thoroughbred Times decided to replicate the New York Times study by looking at the same data and removing all quarter horse statistics. The result was an incident rate of 3.29 per 1,000 […]

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Moran: Racing ‘inevitably will find itself under the thumb of federal authorities’

At ESPN.com, Paul Moran weighs in on the industry reaction to the New York Times article about horse racing and the possibility of reform. Moran believes that, in order to have reform, there first needs to be an acceptance of the reality that there will be breakdowns regardless of the testing and changes made. To […]

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