“Without Them, We’d Be In Trouble For Sure”: Immigration Crackdown Has Many In Racing Worried

by | 11.08.2017 | 1:08pm
An exercise rider cleans his tack after morning training at Churchill Downs

Tightening immigration policies and the recent increase of raids by immigration agents are threatening to lead to a major manpower shortage throughout the U.S. horse racing industry.

As the San Diego Union-Tribune reports, finding – and keeping – committed employees “has been a challenge for the racing industry for a long time.” Many trainers say that many U.S.-born workers aren't willing to do such intensive labor; of those that do apply, many only last a few days.

They're vital to our industry,” trainer Bob Hess Jr. told the Union-Tribune regarding immigrant workers. “Without them, we'd be in trouble for sure.”

The H-2B visa is the most common authorization used by foreign nationals that work in horse racing. The visa is capped at 66,000 annually. In the past, returning worker exemptions didn't count against that number. However, that exemption expired in September 2016, and it wasn't extended.

William Velie, is an immigration attorney based in Oklahoma. He represents trainers across the country, and he told the publication that this year has been the “most difficult” for him to secure visas for his clients' workers.

Without the visas, and with the increase in raids and enforcement, many workers are too scared to go to work.

“That fear is palpable. It's right on the surface,” Velie said. “They're worried everything is going to be ripped away from them in one traffic stop.”

Read more in the San Diego Union-Tribune

  • Lame excuses

    That’s b/c the greedy horsemen pay these guys low wages!

    “Intensive labor” should = better pay

    Once again the racing biz blames someone else for their woes

    • Minneola

      I wouldn’t be a bit surprised that workers that are here, illegally, are taken advantage of with poor work conditions, very low pay, and a host of other really crumby things. After all, what could those workers do? Complain to the law?

    • lastromantibune1

      bravo…agree 100%

    • really?

      We have discussed this before, but you must have missed it. The workers do not get paid low wages (at the vast majority of tracks), the work is dangerous, dirty(allergies) and not for the faint of heart. You could take 100 white Americans and train them to be grooms. Maybe 1 would make it thru. At any wage. Its hard effing work that only people with a driving interest in bettering their lot in life would do, and the vast majority of white Americans that would be candidates for these jobs could care less. For any wage.

      • Sandi York

        Then maybe Americans should learn what work ethic is.

      • McGov

        Obviously the wage is TOO LOW if domestic labour will not sign up. You think because illegals are ok with this wage that that makes it ok??
        People like to work but they don’t accept being taken advantage of unless they have no choice and are desperate….ie illegals.
        How can anyone possibly make the argument that the wage is fine and the hours are fine and all this nonsense…..but at the same time there are many out of work that are willing to work…..but are not stupid enough to work for peanuts endlessly.
        Lots of people do MUCH harder work in much worse conditions…..but when they cash their cheque they tell themselves it was worth it.
        I have no idea why so many people find this so complicated.
        Yes, owners will pay more. It’s an expensive game and if you cannot afford you have no business playing in this sandbox….they should try golf instead and hire an illegal caddy that nobody is targeting and move on.

        • Dadnatron

          Either the wage is too low… or ‘domestic’ workers are paid to not work… or more likely, a combination of the two.

          • Farmer

            When I first started on the racetrack in 1969 the conditions were harsh, the pay was low, and there were all young white kids, African Americans, and a few Puerto Ricans. Now it’s all Mexicans.

          • Todays_Tom_Sawyer

            And I agree the “paying not to work” is a real problem. And the problem with taking them off the government payroll is just how many of these people suddenly off the government entitlement payroll would you actually trust with your horse? I can count them without raising a finger.

        • Old Timer

          How many horses do you own?

      • lastromantribune

        vast majority of white Americans…what a racist statement …check yourself at the dumb door

    • Sandi York

      Amen they never mention these truths. Read mine.

    • PointGivenTCL

      You hit the nail right on the head. Completely beside any debate about whether or not undocumented immigrants should be here, the REASON the racing industry relies on them so heavily is they are vulnerable workers without bargaining power and thus easy to exploit at much lower wages than anyone deserves for the work. To be able to attract legal domestic workers, the industry would need to make and ENFORCE regulations requiring better working conditions for stable help, which is not economically feasible for most trainers under most purse structures and would lead to widespread closure of tracks and contraction of the industry to something of a size more similar to what we see somewhere like Japan. Not saying I think this is a good or a bad thing in the long run (though I do think it’s the most likely future version of a racing industry for a lot of reasons), just that it’s what would need to happen for backstretch workers to get paid what they’re worth.

    • Me

      You are absolutely correct!

    • Farmer

      Obviously you’re not down in the trenches on this issue. Try to find American kids to fill these jobs. Anyone and everyone who has hired Mexican help will tell you they’re the best. We don’t even make our kids cut the lawn anymore. God forbid we take away their x boxes and make them rake the leaves. Grooms at the racetrack make $100. per horse. When they finish, a lot of them have afternoon jobs. They’ll take home $1000. per week. The pay is not the issue….the work ethic is gone.

      • Groom

        I am a groom, in Canada. I may make $100 per horse, but there is no way a groom can work a second job. You have to feed in the afternoons and run your horses. An exercise rider, is the only one, that has time to do a second job. I wish, I took home $1000 a week!!! It’s a way of life, not a job. You really have to love what you do, because it’s not for the money!!

        • David Juffet

          A great groom is so important. Hope you get a big horse someday.

  • Hamish

    Knowledge of one of the horse realms oldest dirty little secrets is now finding its way into mainstream media outlets. This was inevitable, and surely will build momentum, as our current Presidential administration has made it a priority agenda item. Horse industry lobby organizations like the NTRA and AHC should be focused on a plan to utilize available immigrant labor for horse care legally, one that can be acceptable to those calling the shots on this in Washington D.C.

    • Todays_Tom_Sawyer

      Working with them to get “legal” would be a good way to build trust and sustain loyalty. Most everyone I have met on the backside who is not here legally have been extremely hard working and loyal. We should find a way to reward those who are hard working and trustworthy. Just like in any line of business, there will be those that are not worth keeping around, but we should find a way to reward them. Of course, that probably means some tracks will be closing, as the horsemen (at least most) can’t afford a large increase without larger purses.

      • Hamish

        Agree, well said. It’s not like the horse industry can fake out D.C and say “We have no illegal immigrant worker problem.” That train has left the station, so now it is up to everyone that depends on this labor force to both recognize that the party’s over, and participate in a “get legal” solution acceptable to those in charge in the nation’s capitol.

        • Todays_Tom_Sawyer

          Hamish, yes, this is what I was trying to say, just didn’t say it as well as you did. A “get legal” campaign that is pushed/sponsored by trainers, owners and tracks could help.

      • Peter Scarnati

        “….Most everyone I have met on the backside who is not here legally have been extremely hard working and loyal..We should find a way to reward those who are hard working and trustworthy….”
        Really “Mr. Sawyer?” And what exactly would that reward be? Citizenship? Some sort of “legal status?”
        You understand that you are proposing to “reward” “trustworthy” individuals who all committed a crime to be here in the first place.

  • Flag Is Up

    Crazy thought:
    Maybe these workers should have been working on coming to or staying in the US legally.
    When I trained here in Northern California I did the work to get my help papered or at least helped them get Visa’s The large majority of trainers do nothing to make things better for their help.

    • Minneola

      I remember what we used to have, decades ago, when I was a little kid, here, in California: the Bracero program. It seemed to disappear. But, California was (and still is) very dependent on these workers for the agriculture industry. There was no way in he(double L) that any of the locals would have considered working out in the fields. The guest worker program should be ramped up but with a little extra incentive for allowing these workers a quicker route toward citizenship if they keep their noses clean while here. At least, that is what I suggested to my state assemblyman, recently. I’ll be bringing it up next week when I meet with him, again. Emphasizing the need for these workers in agriculture may be more easily sold than if limited to just racing since the economy is more dependent on the former. These workers seem to really value that thing called “work” and, from my personal experience, they are very dependable.

      But, I must applaud your efforts to help your workers. I’m guessing that these workers developed quite a loyalty to you. By the way, I remember Mario Gutierrez mentioning (a few years ago) that when he raced at Hastings, that track provided classes in English language to the jockeys and workers. Now, that is a very progressive way of helping their workers.

      • oh_yes_yes_yes

        If you are looking for another agricultural industry suffering due to the current immigration laws, look to the coffee industry in Hawai’i. It is very dependent on immigrants to bring in their crops and in the past, we assimilated many different immigration waves into our community. Our communities are much more robust and tolerant because of it. Early on, there were waves of Japanese, Chinese, Phillipino, and Portugese. More recently, Mexican, Laotian, and Vietnamese as well as Marshallese (though most of those have come for other reasons as laborers).
        Yes, there is abuse; sometimes by the boss, sometimes by the labor. But we are all human and to be human is to learn how to function as a society. And, I would argue, that the more diverse the society, the more interesting and rewarding it is to live in.

        • Minneola

          You live in a state much like that of CA. Do not have Marshallese but we have the rest as well as many from the Mid-East as well as India. The Hmong community is still active in agriculture but some of the others have moved on and up. Those from Central and South America are the groups that seem to have less upward mobility but, in recent years, there has been some improvement. But, diversity and, along with that, restaurants that provide a worldwide cuisine. The big decision we have is….Where do you want eat? Should we do Persion, Afganistan, Peruvian, Thai, Japanese (Sushi!), RussianUkrainian, Indian, Cuban, Vietnamese, etc.? Any longer, having an exotic meal tends to be meatloaf!

    • PointGivenTCL

      Good on you for helping your workers but are you aware of the scale of the H2-B program (which also is heavily relied upon by the construction and farming industries) vs. the scale of the number of workers required to keep the industry moving? As they mention in the article, 66,000 a year. For all three of those industries plus many others. And applying for and getting approval requires at least some legal help/knowledge to navigate the process. Telling these people to “apply for a legal visa” is like telling them to keep buying lottery tickets.

  • Betty Earl

    They are “worried”, the people in question are breaking the law, hence illegal. Plus those who hire them are also breaking the law.

    • Minneola

      If these are illegal workers, I do not doubt that they are worried about being deported. But, what troubles me, also, is whether there are some trainers who may use them knowing that these workers would never turn them in for shady stuff because of the fear of the trainer turning these illegals in to authorities, if found out. These workers are caught between a rock and a hard place.

      • PointGivenTCL

        There is no “whether,” this is exactly what happens. What incentive would an undocumented worker have to go to the authorities to report their boss’ cheating?

        • Minneola

          And, because too many of them have little English language skills (perhaps, none), how would they be able to fully explain what they know? It seems to me that this is a custom made situation for these trainers to keep their dirty little secrets.

  • Equus

    Is this conversation populated by morons? There is no way for these hard working talented people to “get legal” If you are here without documentation, you can hire a barrage of attorney’s and there is still no pathway to a permanent status for them, unless they have a child born in the U.S., a US spouse, or a fear of political oppression in their home country. I blame owners, whom instead of treating racing as a sport, like golf, yachting or skiing, insist that their horses produce a profit. The baulk at paying their trainers a realistic day rate, and so trainers are forced to source the cheapest labor force. Regardless of these facts, try finding American workers to work in the industry, its almost an impossible challenge and not because of the pay scale. They simply will not do the hours required and do the required work. There are of course exceptions, but there is a reason our industry is staffed by undocumented workers.

    • Hamish

      Many of us morons you refer to know precisely what you just wrote are the CURRENT rules. The point is that a pathway to permanent status for someone working here illegally now needs to be a new idea acceptable to D.C., one that is not available to them at this moment in time. We all know who our hard workers are, that’s easy to identify. This dilemma isn’t going away, so keep your thinking cap on.

    • afleet

      its costs $48K per year to keep a horse in training in PA(way more in NY); thats not a realistic day rate? Why does it cost more to train a racehorse than for a normal adult to live (rent, utilities, food etc.) in the US? The average US worker salary is $59k. The owners are being cheap? How many horse trainers have Master’s degrees or a bachelor’s degree? Why can they charge so much w/only a high school education? Why do the jockeys get 10%? A jockey wins a $100k stake race @6F in 1:09, he earns $6K(over $300k per hour-not bad for someone w/no college degree for the most part)-that seems excessive.

      • really?

        There is no wage that can be considered excessive if an ambulance follows you around while you do your job.

      • Dadnatron

        “300k per hour-not bad for someone w/no college degree for the most part)-that seems excessive.” – That is an asinine argument. Its the same envious small-minded thinking that believes seeing the Doctor for only 10 minutes should mean he gets paid way too much. It takes years and a huge amount of work to gain the skill to see and treat a patient for those 10min. Just like it takes years, brains, physical prowess, and ability to ride a horse to the winner’s circle in 2min.

        Envy is such a weak willed cop-out.

    • lastromantibune1

      yeah ..its called bastards who wont pay.

    • ThinkAboutIt

      If you’ve ever phoned the INS for information, you first have to listen through a multitude of prompts to get through with various ‘waiver’ offerings for undocumented issues. I think it is not out of reach to get into the system.

  • McGov

    Ok soooo we are worried about the law being enforced and illegal immigrants….the PERFECTLY silent, compliant worker….being lost.
    And there is a problem finding workers in a country seemingly desperate to find work????? SOOO desperate that a guy mostly made famous through a show called ” Apprentice”…..actually somehow HIMSELF becomes the apprentice President. And then he goes and tightens up on illegals.
    They are ILLEGAL. It’s not any more complicated than that.
    The problem isn’t a labour shortage…..the problem is THE WAGE. Obviously.
    Pay and protect in a more appropriate manner and THEY WILL LINE UP.
    Or, change the rules so they are not “illegal” any more and stop complaining about “no jobs” and electing people that everyone else in the world must ALSO suffer through.
    The end :)

    • duchess

      Pay, benefits, and hours. Better pay, good benefits, and a base forty hour work week with overtime pay for going over that and maybe you could get legal workers?

      • McGov

        The market will dictate what is fair and appropriate. But, that takes the power away from those in control and they no like that too much ;)
        ie….post an available position in local employment advertising vehicles….post starting at 50k….if no response then 60k….if no response then…
        Eventually, they will come…..everyone agrees that there is a labour supply so it is pretty obvious why that supply refuses this particular demand.

        • Birdy2

          You rock, dude.

        • Always Curious

          Under the HB2 visa there are a lot of hoops to jump through to get a job with a trainer. Applicants need an employer already and the employer has a long paperwork process. The employer must prove (documentation) they have advertised and have no citizen applicants. I think it takes about a year. They need to increase the HB2 visas because that in itself is a “vetted” process IMO. No one should be working around horses without experience because it is dangerous. US workers starting out with no experience should go do another job they can handle. And many just plain out don’t want the dirty, physical labor.

    • really?

      Pal u could pay $50k a year and still not find american workers to do the job

      • McGov

        Well, let’s pay them 50k and find out. Maybe 60k ? Supply and demand. Looks like that will become a reality that makes MANY uncomfortable.
        We must stop excluding this category of worker from legislation, too.
        Make the position one in which domestic labour will WANT to work it.
        This is about GREED, pal :). Horse racing is the sport of kings….horses costing hundreds of thousands…..one horse sometimes MILLIONS.
        Bit of a joke that has been tolerated this long….from this seat anyways.

        • Dadnatron

          This is only half of the equation. If you pay Americans NOT to work, they will not. If you decrease ‘free funds’ to able bodied workers, then that $12/hr on the farm becomes real money. But when you are simply choosing between a check which equals out to about $10/hr after everything including housing, healthcare, etc is combined, and weigh it against actually having to WORK for $12/hr… then it just isn’t worth it. You can’t fix the issue on only one side, and expect it to balance.

          • Username_Redacted

            Where is this free money to not work you speak of? I live in California, am I eligible? Can I get my mortgage paid for too, with a stipend to bet the races?

      • Sandi York

        Here’s one here. You have to live the game and get paid to play.

      • Minneola

        I know that some may disagree with you but it is a reality. A lot might depend on where one lives. If they live in a state that provides some really great unemployment benefits, such as California, $50K is not worth it for too many. Why work doing manual labor when one can sit at home and watch TV, instead. I, also, blame this on our society and educational system that looks down on manual labor as if it is some sort of an embarrassment. They shouldn’t. An honest day’s work should be heralded.

  • Rachel

    Baloney there aren’t American horse people who don’t work hard & sacrifice a lot in the equine world to pursue their passion.

    Most American horse people simply don’t want to work in & be associated with the horse racing industry.

    • Jon

      I’m an American business owner that sent 30 emails to trainers this year to start at bottom only one reply Anthony Granitz. He had plenty of help, but offered to help me contact people to get me started. Only reply! Your comment is bs! I have all 30 emails

      • Minneola

        Two things: One, it might be that you appear overly qualified for the job and employers fear that you will not want to stay for long. (Best to downplay just to what is required for the position in this case.) Two, you may be viewed as a threat since you cannot be held under someone’s thumb and, if you see something that looks fishy, you might not hesitate to go to the authorities. Those trainers that you sent those emails may view you with suspicion.

        • Jon

          Did not look at it that way. Great points.

        • Jon

          I know one thing my knucklehead character friends and I decided that we are buying in to the claiming game next spring to start learn and if he’ll take us on Mr. Granitz will be our trainer. Couldn’t of been a nicer human:)

          • Minneola

            If you were hoping to gain some experience in horse care, you might want to check to see if there are any horse rescues in your area. You might go online to see. But, another resource might be an equine veterinarian that may have that information. It would give you experience in grooming, cleaning stalls, feeding, etc. Oh and by the way, you might not even consider it work but something really enjoyable to do.

          • Jon

            That’s what I will do. Thank you.

          • really?

            You can go to any racetrack in america, tell the stable gate you want to work, they will let you in with a pass (possible after training) and you could start work immediately. You don’t need emails, just show up. I did.
            Hotwalker, hotwalker foreman, groom, owner, trainer, jockey agent.

          • Jon

            I did email cause of where I live. I would have to move. So I didn’t want to drive all over eastern half of country to find job. If they replied we have opening I would have gone to interview. That’s why.

          • really?

            like i said-go to any racetrack in america. Part of horse racing is just showing up. A big part.

        • StrideBig

          I would like to say this is what I did. 👍🏻 I found a OTTB rescue group and began volunteering there.

          The fist day there I met a wonderful woman, who I learned is a race horse owner and GF to a trainer at Remington Park. I told her about how I’ve been wanting to learn more about the backside work and industry. I felt like a kid in a candy store just talking to her. She then asked me if I would like to come help out at the barn and learn more!! I felt giddy and said yes immediately!!

          So yes! Definitely find a nearby OTTB rescue group. It’s a great opportunity to meet valuable contacts and maybe make a great friend as well. I’m happy I did.

          ~K

          • Minneola

            And, I will bet that you enjoyed every minute of being there. Although you started off as a volunteer, in a way, it was like doing an unpaid internship. It gave you skills as well as an understanding of what the job is. So, in the future, if you do have an opportunity and desire to get a paid job on some track, that experience will make it so much easier for you to get hired. Again, you have basic skills that are needed but, also, your experience also will demonstrate that you understand what the job would entail. Not everyone would be willing to clean/muck stalls. Not everyone really cares about horses or is comfortable around them. This tears down that obstacle for you. You’ve erased that question mark in that trainer’s mind.

          • StrideBig

            It’s been amazing and a real eye opener as well. I’ve followed her around like a puppy dog and helping with minor things and also with a not so minor thing of chasing down one of their horses when it stumbled, lost the trainer on the track and then bolted for the barns. I haven’t sprinted so much in my life!! Finally grabbed him when he came to a halt at one of the walkers. Whew!! I wasn’t expecting that and talk about getting your blood flowing in the cold! Still so much to learn, but learning a lot every day.

            ~K

          • Minneola

            Something I do is to carry a couple of carrots with me at all times. One horse got loose from its owner and she couldn’t catch up to him. I headed around the opposite side and to his front. Pulled out that carrot and… you know the rest. Love those horses. So much intelligence and so much in personality!

          • StrideBig

            I keep horse cookies in my pockets. But had no way of trying to use them in this instance. Lol the horse was panicked and ran a good two hundred yards before it came to a stop. I did give him a cookie while I waited for the assistant to come collect him from me. I was totally out of breath! Lmao

            ~K

    • ThinkAboutIt

      In the UK there are accredited racing schools that students can enter and achieve certification and make a career out of it. Apprenticeships, as well. Methods contrast there in that a stable worker usually has a number of regular assigned ‘charges’ about three in number) in their care. They feed, muck, ride/exercise, cool out, and groom each horse in their charge and are their daily responsibility for them. They return in the afternoon to feed again and finish off their duties. They keep all the daily routine for their charges and can pick up on any issues their horse(s) may come across. In this way, they know their horses’ well being on an individual, hands-on aspect throughout its training at the facility. Some take their experience and go on from there to other positions in the racing industry.

      • Always Curious

        We are a long way from that.

  • admiral

    Very interesting. A lot of spin in these comments- But how many owners/trainers are doing what’s done in the real world- How many of these people are out there trying to recruit young people into the sport. Recruiting means going outside the barn area, holding seminars, visiting schools, etc and implementing a true training program that will attract the American born youth into the racing business. The only recruitment going on is trainers trying to recruit owners. You who are complaining need to start being proactive to protect your own interests

    • Jon

      Great points.

  • The irony of trainers who vote and support Trump complaining about immigration impact in their business if thick enough to cut with a chain saw. Amusing if not so devastating to the lives of the workers. There has to be a better way for the backstretch workers to receive some consideration.

    • Jon

      Love it!

    • Peter Scarnati

      Yep. No doubt. The lack of shedrow workers is Trump’s fault.
      It certainly couldn’t be the fault of the horsemen who pay pathetically low wages. Especially those horsemen who race at tracks which has seen its purses expanded by a factor in the dozens or more by slot machines. Have those horsemen increased the pay of their help by the same factor in which their purses were exploded by slot revenue? Now there’s a question which NO ONE in the industry would dare to answer.

      • Jon

        Spot on ! “Need slots to survive.” they cried. They got them and purses tripled and still pay help nothing….

        • Yes, you are spot on, it mirrors those corporations that are making record profits of don’t allow anything in terms of increased wages to trickle down to their employees. And now Trump would like to lower corporate taxes and they used that same old and tired “trickle down” b. s.

          • Jon

            Agree 100% Barry

          • lastromantribune

            Barry I agree with you most times but your full of it about this subject. you get your green card…you come to this country….really very simple. you don’t sneak across the border….why do you think it is called a border ? the problem is trainers not wanting to pay good wages for the amount of hard work required….GREED.

          • Not so my friend. I’ve taken an informal survey. I also ran my own stable. The problem is finding suitable help. Nobody I know is looking to save a buck, they are looking for the best people they can find. I admit that I race on a high level and don’t know what happens outside of the major circuits, so maybe you are correct, but not with those I come into contact with.

          • Always Curious

            Business taxes keep this country afloat. Small businesses basically prop up the state and which then crush the businesses. If you are a day late on your quarterly taxes the fines mount quickly. Before you know it you it you could owe $250,000 and you are Out of Business. No jobs for anyone.

  • Sandi York

    Tiz true what this man states. Our own citizens are mostly unwilling to accept slave wages and disrespectful treatment.
    In an industry referred to as the “Sport of Kings”trainers have gotten away paying pauper wages to illegal immigrants to do the dirty work. I for one am laughing my you know what off and appreciating what an ignorant president is unwittingly doing to his capitalist buddies.

  • Hill

    As someone who has worked in the industry as a groom, American, and college educated the problem is the pay. I worked 70-80 hours a week for weeks straight without one single day off and this paid $350 a week as a groom. When I asked about a day off to drive and visit my family I was told I was in the wrong business if I wanted to take days off. The problem isn’t that Americans don’t want these jobs, its that the current way of treating the workers, making them work every single day for little pay just isn’t going to work. The system is the problem, not the “American” workers. The article states that when they get “American” workers they usually only last a few days. Well give them one day off a week and pay them what you should and see how long they last then. The trainers have been making a living off the workers in the current system for years and won’t do anything else unless they are forced to do so. I understand the argument that if you paid more to workers and had to hire more to give everyone a day off during the week that the cost would drive out owners. Well if this is what it costs to train horses then that”s just the way it is. For fair compensation, a 5 or 6 day work week, and any benefits at all you would have people lined up for these jobs.

  • Dadnatron

    I think there will be a HUGE wakeup to America when they finally get Immigration sorted out.

    The growers want it fixed, believing their ‘legal’ workers will continue to work for low pay.
    The trainers want it fixed, believing their ‘legal’ workers will continue to work for low pay.
    The US Populace want it fixed, believing those same dishwashers, line cooks, produce pickers, grooms, gardeners, etc will stay put in those manual labor jobs and leave ‘their good jobs’ alone.

    The reality is… the Illegal folk… mainly Hispanic, are incredibly motivated to work hard. Some journeyed over 3000 miles to get a job mucking stalls in NY… do you really think that THAT desire to work will STAY in the barn? Those guys will immediately begin working in jobs in which they cannot work currently, because of their illegal status. The Carpentry industry is already moving that way, but it will explode. Any job that doesn’t require a higher level education will find itself pressed upon by willing immigrants.

    All those ‘illegals’ who are willing to work in those manual labor jobs will use their willingness to work to take YOUR jobs. They are MUCH more willing to work hard than most Americans…

    I’d hire them. The quality of many American’s I can hire is far inferior in many ways.

    Mark my words… this will NOT end in the fashion most here believe.

    • Always Curious

      Yeah those illegal alien carpenters robbed a lot of American workers for a long time (Walmart used them routinely) it was a nightmare for safety sake after Katrina.

  • Larry sterne

    ICE TOO SCARED TO GO AFTER DRUG CARTELS AND BAD HOMBRES. Maybe they should stake out a children’s playground to catch the real meanies., oh wait! They have already done that. Hard working people making our racing industry strong leave them alone. Take your guns and go catch someone who is selling drugs to your children

  • lastromantribune

    now if there were no illegals to do the work…do you think racing would go away? hogwash….by hiring illegals to do the work that keeps wages down…..nothing else.

  • Always Curious

    My completely serious question: If ICE, as the DOJ states, only wants to round up felons, why is everyone afraid of getting picked up and deported other than fear & rumors through the media. Can anyone give examples where the backside has been raided and people deported who were not felons? How were their cases handled after picked up? We certainly need reform. Would the designation as an Agriculture workers make it easier for the needed workers make it to the backside?

  • Beau Geste

    I’m very sorry that some of us in this country are asking for things to be done according to the law. It’s a sad commentary on how far down we have gone that this is a, pardon the pun “foreign” concept to people. Why has it been accepted for too many years that people come to this country illegally; please notice the key word “illegally”. I have nothing against immigrants; as I have said before, I come from immigrants. But it must be done legally. There is nothing admirable about supporting the past system that allowed an open border. We, the citizens of this country have every right and responsibility to keep our home safe and I really don’t care what foreign politicians, illegal immigrants, profiting businesses or self serving Democrats and Republicans have to say about it. This is my home and I want to make it safe and secure; I have no reason to apologize to anyone for feeling that way.

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