‘Student Of The Game’: Q & A With Jockey Drayden Van Dyke

by | 10.07.2018 | 1:57pm
Van Dyke used his personal Equicizer as a rehabilitation device during his comeback from a broken arm sustained in January 2017.

23-year-old jockey Drayden Van Dyke recently met with Santa Anita's Zoe Cadman and Alexis Garske for observations from one of So-Cal's brightest young stars, well on his way to becoming one of racing's signature riders.

Much has been made of the mentors who have guided you, but what have you learned on your own?

“I've definitely had to learn some things first-hand. You have to make some of your own mistakes that teach a lesson you couldn't be told. That's the kind of stuff you have to learn on your own.”

What' one of the biggest mistakes you've ever made?

“Not showing up for workers when I was an apprentice. I was working with Tom Proctor and had rented a house with Mike Smith in Del Mar. It was my first summer and I was excited. I had spent a lot but unfortunately, I had to stay in the tack room for a week as punishment.

“At least I could see the moon from my bed (laughing).”

Favorite racehorse of all time?

“There are a lot of them but definitely Justify is up there for me. To be involved in the history that he made and to be able to break his maiden and work him is really cool to me.”

Have you ever wanted to play another sport?

“I would love to play basketball, if I had the size, definitely. Second behind that would be golf. I don't have a handicap but I shoot in the mid-80's.

“Even when I play for fun, I like to be competitive. I'll play for fun but the fun goes away and I'm definitely trying to win. I enjoy it, but I'm definitely always trying.”

Beer or wine?

“Wine. Definitely.”

Cardi B or Nicki Minaj?

“(Laughs) Well, who won the fight the other day?”

Football or Baseball?

“Football.”

What did you eat last night?

“Scrambled eggs with avocado and broccoli. Yes, eggs for dinner. I love eggs.”

Are there other jobs in racing that look interesting or that you could see yourself doing one day?

“I think I'd enjoy TV. Maybe as an analyst. Similar to what Jerry Bailey is doing and what Gary did. I think I would enjoy doing something like that.”

What's a dream day off for you?

“Not waking up to a phone call, sleeping in and waking up naturally. Just taking my time, having some coffee and not really making any plans.”

What's a little-known, fun fact about yourself?

“I like rap music. I'll memorize entire songs so when I go out and we're dancing I can get into it and rap along (laughing).

If you could have dinner with anyone, who would it be?

“I'd like to have dinner with my dad one more time.”

(Drayden's father passed away in 2014)

What gets you out of bed that early every day?

“Love of the game definitely but also fear of missing out. I always feel like I'm missing something if I'm away for more than just one day. I don't like to be away more than that. I don't want to miss a new horse coming along.

“Also, the feeling of winning a race and breezing really nice horses is very addicting for me.”

Do you have any pets?

“I do, Gucci, is my mini German-Australian Shepard. He just turned two and he's like a little human. He was just a little fur ball when I got him.”

Drayden Van Dyke, his dog Gucci and Zoe Cadman

Gucci? Why that particular name?

“I'm a Gucci guy. I mostly like their shoes and watches. The clothes are still a little out of my price range and size, but I like to mess around with the accessories.

“I wasn't really into fashion when I was growing up in Kentucky and Arkansas. One, I didn't have the money. And two, I didn't know of the brand back then. I got into all of that when I came to California and was around Mike (Smith.)”

That's a great segway into talking about ‘Money Clip' – your first winner. Take us through that first ride. (Money Clip broke his maiden at Hollywood Park on Nov. 11, 2013, under Van Dyke).

“Gary Stevens was originally supposed to ride that horse for Tom Proctor. I was living in Tom's tack room and just hanging around the barn. It had rained so they took it off the turf and moved it to the Polytrack.

“Tom called Gary and said, ‘Why don't you stay home? I don't want you comin' out and having to get wet. I'll put the bug boy on. The horse needs a race anyway, he's not ready.' So that's how I got my chance to ride, and I won.

“Tom is more of an old school-type trainer, as his father Willard was, and they usually give a horse a few races to mature. He schools them the right way and always looks toward the future. My instructions were to take him back and make one run. I was told, ‘If he finishes well, so be it. If not, we'll get ‘em next time.'

“He made a run but I didn't do much. I was green and shocked at what was going on. I just got up in the knick of time.

“I watched the replay the other day and I thought, ‘Man, Drayden, do something! I didn't do much of anything. I was just thinking come on wire, come on wire.'

“After winning, I definitely got ‘initiated.' I was caked with eggs, ice water, powder, you name it. Everything you get when you win your first race. But it was a little different for me. I had to hurry up, take a shower and get back to cool the horse out.

“I think I gained other trainers respect by seeing me do that and watching how Proctor brought me along the right way.”

Talk about Proctor and his impact on you.

Trainer Tom Proctor gives Van Dyke a leg up in the Rodeo Drive at Santa Anita Park on September 29.

“He's definitely kept me grounded and still keeps me grounded. I recently rode for him at Kentucky Downs and did something he told me not to do and he let me know. He told me I did it wrong. I'm very lucky to have him.”

Fast forward to getting on Justify in the mornings. What were your initial thoughts of him?

“Obviously, he's talented but what really stood out to me was Bob's reaction when I first worked him. Bob just said, ‘Wow, that's a serious horse right there.'

“I kept working him and he was just doing things effortlessly. We were just crushing every horse we worked with and I wasn't moving on him. He was barely even trying.

“I was really looking forward to riding him in the afternoon and breaking his maiden, which I did, and I was very lucky to be involved with him.”

How did it feel getting taken off Justify, even though it was for Mike? Bittersweet?

“It was. But, there's nothing I can do and that's just the business. You just have to keep smiling and keep working hard. That's what I've done and I was rewarded with being leading rider at Del Mar this summer.

“I was happy to see Justify win the Triple Crown and I wouldn't have wanted it for anyone more than Mike, so it was great to be there. I even helped his mom get to the Winner's Circle. She was having trouble getting there, and security wouldn't let her in, but we got her in. I didn't, but I was there to see it, so that was really, really cool.”

Did it fuel your fire? Did you think, ‘I'll get my shot'?

“Of course. A lot of people have horses continually coming in so Justify won't be the last Triple Crown horse. He might be actually, I mean whoever really knows, but there are plenty of horses coming in, so hopefully, I can be there to ride them.”

What do you do for fun? Did you have any fun this summer?

“I have fun! I was really busy this summer, though. I think I had two mornings off the entire meet. I was keeping straight so no, I didn't go out much. I was riding about seven or eight a day and working about six each morning. I'm working serious horses and very expensive horses, so I respect that.

“After the last day, I had a good time and went out with my friends.”

With so many good trainers putting you on good horses and you and your agent, Brad Pegram, known for picking your spots, did you have an inkling that Del Mar would be as successful as it was?

“It's funny because my agent and Flavien Prat's agent, Derek Lawson, have a bit of a rivalry and they'll go back ‘n' forth. There's a bit of a rivalry between me and Flavien as well so we were both a little like, ‘We're coming for you. We're loaded so be ready!'

“We had a lot of good horses, a lot of 2-year-olds, so I was looking forward to having a good meet.

“Flavien doesn't always say much but if he does it's always after a race and he gets on you for a move or something. But, he's a friend of mine, we play golf together. He's a fierce competitor. He makes me ride better and I'm sure I help him ride a better race sometimes as well.

“I wish there were other riders who had that same level of competitiveness, it makes you ride better. I like it, I love it.”

How big of an accomplishment was earning the leading riding title by five at Del Mar?

“It was a big accomplishment for sure. I've been leading rider at Los Alamitos a couple of times but not all the big riders are there, trying their hardest. To get it at Del Mar, when everyone is trying to win everything they can, is huge for me and my agent. I'll never forget it.

Has anything changed since winning the title, or the seven races in one day?

“I feel like I'm really starting to do more things now. The types of races I'm winning, the number of races I'm winning. Even Mike and Gary haven't won seven in a day. Winning the title on top of that meant a lot.

“I'm getting a fan base now. Even at the coffee shop the other day I was recognized, it was cool.

“It makes me stay on track. The better I do, the more opportunities I get and the better I do. I get in a zone. That momentum helps me to do even better.”

Do you find yourself thinking even more about your late father with your recent success?

“The day I won seven races, yes. On the gallop out, I looked up and talked to him for a minute. I was hoping he saw it. I wish he was around to see it now because he was seeing how well I was doing when I started and I still had no clue what I was doing.

“Now that I'm riding at the top of my level I wish he was a part of it, for a lot of reasons. I know he's still watching and still proud of me, though.”

Van Dyke points out a few of his accomplishments, including a 2014 Eclipse Award honoring him as the nation's Outstanding Apprentice.

So many names come to mind that have helped you on your path, is it especially nice to consult with them all for more than just riding advice?

“That fact really helped me after my dad passed away. Without them, I would have been more of a wreck and maybe even now still. Who knows what direction I would have gone in or what could have happened to me?

“Mike and Gary especially were there for me, and they're still always there for me. I can call them any time. They're my best friends. I golf with them, hang out with them, work out together. I don't only see them as my mentors but as my friends. I'm really, really lucky.

“I can go to them for anything. As I got older and grew some hair on my chin, I didn't know how to shave. I asked Gary what to do and he just said, ‘Come here. I'll show you.' He got me a razor and some cream and showed me how. It stuck with me and I think those moments have meant a lot to him, too.”

Favorite racetrack?

“I love the history of Santa Anita. I used to watch Seabiscuit three times a week. Santa Anita was like a character since so much was filmed here. I couldn't believe I was here when I arrived. The mountains…I was struck by it.”

What are you looking forward to most this meet?

“Hopefully keeping my streak going, my ‘hotness.' Hopefully winning a lot of races and stakes races and I'm really looking forward to riding at Breeders' Cup.”

Some of Drayden's mentors and their thoughts on him:

Bob Baffert:

“I was watching him before he got hurt. I was looking for new talent and told his agent that he's got a lot of potential. I watched him come up under Proctor and loved the fact that he really made Drayden appreciate everything. He learned to love the horse first and that's so important when you become a horseman. That's what really caught my eye.

“He's little, he's light and horses run for him. He was patient and I saw him getting stronger.

“When he started working horses for me I liked that he didn't mind wearing a radio. Some guys don't like that. I really think that Proctor created a great foundation.

“I've always told him that you'll learn from the good horses because they'll get there with or without you. He's handled some high-pressure situations. That's the hardest part. It's easy to ride a horse that's 10-1 but when they're 2-5, everyone's expecting a win. You become a target and he's learned to cope with that.

“He listens, he's learning. He's a student of the game. I'll give him pointers. He'll get off a horse that's not even mine and I'll tell him, ‘You could have done this or that,' and he listens. He'll take it in. He wants to be the man, the go-to guy and he's going to get there. He's got a good head on his shoulders.

“I was really happy to see him be leading rider at Del Mar, I knew it meant a lot to him.

“Mike Smith has been a big help and Drayden really looks up to him. What I really like is that he's competitive. He's not going to do something crazy, or impede someone because he wants to win himself, I like that. He loves the horse, he really does, and I can tell. It makes a difference and it's pretty cool.”

Gary Stevens:

“He's a great athlete and he's always been a great athlete. He's always wanted to learn and he continues to want to learn.

Drayden Van Dyke in the gym

“You'll see some guys get to a point where they just stop improving but Drayden improves every day. He's turned into a student of the game. He loves the game and he loves what he's doing. That's what you've got to be to be successful.

“I'm proud of him. He's like another son to me. He's got myself, Mike Smith, Tom Proctor, he's got a big support group that always stands behind him. The thing I'm most proud of is that he hasn't let it go to his head. He's respectful of his elders and he's kind of a throw back. He's always confident but he's not cocky and that's cool.

“It's nice to have someone young that listens and wants to learn. There's so many who you'll try and help and they don't want it. They think they know it all and that's understandable being young. But Drayden, his ears and eyes are always wide open.”

Brad Pegram:

“There are definitely similarities between my two jocks, in addition to differences. Their dedication to staying fit to ride, their work ethic, and their mental approach. Drayden has learned all Mike's good habits.

“Mike has taught Drayden how to be the ultimate professional and how to be best prepared to ride. He's learned a lot but he's also open to learning and he listens. He's a student of the game, just as Mike is still. Mike is still learning and will talk to riders that are retired about different races so, yeah, Drayden is taking all of that in.

“They make my job very easy. They're both ultimate professionals so it makes it very easy on me.

“I've always noticed Drayden's talent. I admire Tom for the way he brought him up and the way he taught him. It was awesome to watch.

“He's a genuinely good kid. In a great way, he hasn't changed. He's a very mellow, humble guy.”

Mike Smith:

“I've seen him grow up, been through the growing pains with him. To watch him get over that hump and to see him really focus in on his career and watch him ride right now, it's great. He's riding with so much confidence. He's not a teenager anymore and he knows what he wants. He's just getting better and better and it's a lot of fun for me to watch. It makes me proud.

“To be riding extremely well, at the top of the level, and the competition he's riding against isn't easy, makes me a very proud older brother.

“I think his work ethic comes from Mr. Tom Proctor. They instilled all of that in him and it's so important. The work isn't over until you get to my age and then maybe you can back off a little.

“He does a good job in the morning and teaches them well, gets along with them. And again, a lot of that comes from getting to work for Proctor back at the farm. The rest of it is just learning from riding. I truly believe that you don't get really good at riding until you're in your thirties. To see him come along now, just give him another 10 years. It's incredible.

“I remember I was told that when I was his age and I thought I was riding on top of the world. But it is so true and you learn so much, about how to handle yourself as well. A lot of not only representing yourself but also the sport comes later in life.

“I'm extremely grateful I'm not coming up in this era of everyone seeing everything you do. I think he's done a pretty good job with it.

“He still has a lot to learn of course but he knows it. He truly understands that. This game can humble you very fast and to just stay even keel.

“The great thing about this sport is that even when things aren't doing that well, they'll always come around.”

Twitter Twitter
Paulick Report on Instagram