PR Special Keeneland January: American Pharoah’s First Yearlings

by | 01.08.2018 | 9:25am

The Paulick Report in once again pleased to offer a special print publication available here and on the grounds at the Keeneland January Horses of All Ages Sale in Lexington, Ky.

In this edition of the PR Special, Natalie Voss shares attitudes and perspectives from trainers in Great Britain about the use of medication. Frank Mitchell turns his Stallion Spotlight on American Pharoah's first crop of yearlings and suggests a few hip numbers to keep an eye on at the sale with Five To Watch.

Our Honor Roll looks at the career of Keeneland January grad and multiple Grade 1 winner Practical Joke. Plus, Dr. Dale Brown answers a question about equine vaccines in Ask Your Veterinarian.

Click here to read this Keeneland January edition of the PR Special.

  • Tinky

    A quick take on AP’s first yearlings to be sold, based solely on the catalogue pages:

    Four of the six are bays, while one is chestnut and one is roan. This clearly suggests that, at least in terms of color, he is not prepotent.

    While mares visiting commercially attractive stallions can’t all be outstanding, given the obscene size of books, two of the six in this instance are notably weak.

    The dam of hip 330 was unraced, and has produced seven foals of racing age, none of which were good enough to gain black-type. The second-dam was unplaced, and only produced three winners (again no black-type). So one would have to look to the third dam to find any good-class foals.

    The dam of hip 675 was only placed, and has produced two foals of racing age. The second-dam produced five winners, the best of which placed inn a minor, restricted stakes race at Woodbine. So again, one must look to the third dam to find any quality production.

    Remember, these mares were covered by a Triple Crown winner in his first season!

    • Circe

      He will be able to sire Chestnut foals because his dam is Chestnut. His color genes are Bay/Chestnut. Grey is a modifier that can only be passed from a Grey parent, its 50% chance to get the grey modifier.

      • Tinky

        Yes, of course he will be capable of getting chestnuts. The question is with what frequency relative to chestnut mares bred?

        • He will get 50 percent chestnuts when bred to chestnut mares. The coin (to determine which genetic component goes to each foal) lands one side or the other.

          • Tinky

            Thanks Frank.

          • Tinky

            Frank,

            My initial response was based on my memory of Seattle Slew. I have now done some checking, and found this:

            Using the pedigreequery site, which, while probably not fully complete, nor 100% accurate, is typically a reliable source of basic information, I find 991 foals of SS, and zero chestnut foals. I checked the colors of mares individually through the offspring with names beginning with A through C, and found at least 25 chestnut mares. Not a single resulting foal was chestnut.

            I was also quite active when SS had runners, and cannot remember a chestnut.

            Can you explain that?

        • Circe

          It would be 50%, since he is bay/chestnut and a chestnut mare would be chestnut/chestnut.

          • Tinky

            I understand the theoretical science, but what about Seattle Slew?

            Using the pedigreequery site, which, while probably not fully complete, nor 100% accurate, is typically a reliable source of basic information, I find 991 foals of SS, and zero chestnut foals. I checked the colors of mares individually through the offspring with names beginning with A through C, and found at least 25 chestnut mares. Not a single resulting foal was chestnut.

            I was also quite active when SS had runners, and cannot remember a chestnut.

            Can you explain that?

    • Lehane

      I found it interesting that Black Caviar’s dam had never raced.

      • Tinky

        I’ve never done a proper study, but I, and I imagine most serious breeders, would prefer to breed to an unraced mare (which at least might have had above average ability and/or class), than one with a modest to poor race record, assuming similar pedigrees otherwise. The only advantage of breeding to the the latter possibly being soundness.

    • larry

      Tapits best have not all been grey and Curlins best have not been chestnut so whats your point?

      • Tinky

        Some successful stallions get a variety of types, while others (e.g. Seattle Slew) “stamp” their offspring far more consistently. Such stamping is an expression of prepotency, which, in turn, is a characteristic found in every successful stallion.

  • Constance Hartman

    Good job on the article Frank Mitchell.

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