KY: Beshear to push for approval of gambling amendment in January

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Although he admits that the task will certainly be difficult, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear told reporters Wednesday that he would like to see a constitutional amendment for expanded gambling to be passed in the legislative session that begins in January.

In a news conference at the Capitol, Beshear stated, “I don’t think it’s any secret that expanded gaming is one of the issues that I think should be addressed by the people of this state. I am hopeful that we may be able to get a constitutional amendment passed in the upcoming session.”

Beshear has been trying to get legislation passed for the expansion of gambling since he was elected governor in 2007, but the proposal been blocked by the Republican-led state Senate. In 2011, the Senate turned down an amendment to allow for the expansion of gambling to Kentucky’s racetracks.

If the amendment is finally passed by both chambers, it will then have to be approved by Kentucky voters.

One of the strongest opponents to the amendment, Senate President David Williams, will not be there in January. Williams has been appointed by Beshear to fill a vacancy in an open circuit court seat in Williams’ Southern Kentucky district.

» Read more at Lexington Herald-Leader
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  • David

    The Governor is smart enough to realize it’ll take more than
    a Williams exit to do it.  When first
    discussed, proponents said no pleasure was had by suggesting casinos; rather,
    support would be provided to an ailing, “signature” industry and be a means to
    corral tax dollars lost to bordering states. 
    However, recent evidence to suggests a healthy percentage of the
    populace could care less about helping the racing industry, particularly if it
    means preferential treatment extended to tracks for (alternative gaming)
    franchises. Language to benefit racing is now thought toxic and the Legislature
    isn’t likely to rubberstamp a statewide referendum without more cover than
    economic impact and lost taxes.  LOL
    Gov. 

  • Ace

     With Williams out of the way and Churchill partnering up with Delaware North in Ohio, the doors are now open for doing business behind the scenes with bags of money.  There will be expanded gambling in Ky., finally.

  • Ace

     And those that get in the way will be made an offer they can’t refuse.  Google Delaware North for more details.

  • Forthegood

    This is a well travelled road that has ultimately led to a dead end in the past. Are there real indications that going down the road again will have different results?  Good to see that KY T-bred industry leaders have moved forward in marketing their strength – the best race horses are bred in KY.  Hope they aren’t diverted away to expend too much money and resources on trying to fight the political battle to get casino gambling.

  • No Penalties in Horse Racing

    This song has been played way too many times.  It’s getting old.

  • http://twitter.com/Ubercapper Ellis Starr

    If the proponents of expanded gaming would take a page from the recently run political ads suggesting that the Coal industry isn’t just about coal, but about every other business and industry that benefits economically from it, it would pass.

    Very few legislators will stand in the way of new construction and ongoing businesses that will provide thousands of needed jobs for the commonwealth as well as additional tax revenue. If they keep the message simple – jobs, jobs and more jobs, it will pass.

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