Visitation and Service for Kenny Noe Jr. Set for May 23

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Kenneth “Kenny” Noe, Jr., former president, chief executive officer and chairman of The New York Racing Association, Inc. (NYRA) board died Sunday at the age of 84.

Noe, who served as a racing secretary and steward at NYRA during the 1970s, was hired as president and general manager of the organization in October, 1994. In September, 1995 he was elevated to chairman of the board of trustees, and in December of 1996 was named chairman and chief executive officer. He resigned as board chairman and CEO in October, 2000.

A native of Hamilton, Ohio, Noe held a variety of positions in the racing industry at more than a dozen tracks. In addition to New York, Noe served as racing secretary at a number of major venues in the East and Midwest including Hialeah, Garden State Park, Arlington Park and Washington Park. He also spent 11 years as the president and general manager of Calder Race Course from 1979-90.  A past director of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, Noe was also a director of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau, and the Miami Heart Institute.

He is survived by his son Jeff and daughter Holly.

Visitation and Funeral Service Thursday, May 23

A visitation and service will be held Thursday, May 23 for Kenny Noe Jr., at Fred Hunter’s Hollywood Memorial Garden Home in Hollywood, Florida.

Mr. Noe, former president and general manager at Calder Race Course and president, CEO and chairman of The New York Racing Association (NYRA), passed away Sunday at the age of 84.

Thursday’s visitation will be from 6-8 p.m. at Fred Hunter’s Hollywood Memorial Garden Home, 6301 Taft Street Hollywood. A funeral service will also be Thursday at 7 p.m. at Fred Hunter’s Hollywood Memorial Garden Home. Tom LaPointe will officiate. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested donations be sent to Thoroughbred After-Care Program Inc. at Gulfstream Park. For further instructions pertaining to donations please contact [email protected] or (954) 658-7156.

Known as “The Chief”, Kenny Noe was known throughout the Thoroughbred industry and held various job positions for over 50 years. He served as racing secretary and steward in New York during the 1970′s and held that position at a number of major venues in the East and Midwest, including Hialeah Park, Arlington Park and Washington Park. A past director of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, Mr. Noe was also a director of Thoroughbred Racing Associations, the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau, and the Miami Heart Institute.

Mr. Noe’s son, Jeffrey, is racing secretary at Gulfstream Park.

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  • Jay Stone

    A really good guy who knew every facet of the game. Mr. Noe was from the old school that wanted things down right and above board. If you did things that way he was a pleasure to deal with and if you didn’t it was hit the road. The game today is sadly lacking executives like him.

  • Marshall Cassidy

    A user and an abuser; a social climber and an egomaniac. Was Kenny good for New York? Probably not, but it no longer matters. Rest in fitful peace, Kenny Noe, Jr..

    • Tinky

      Sadly, I couldn’t agree more.

      • Edward Plesa

        You must be one rotten person who would use this forum at this time to spew your venom.

        • mwino63

          agreed EP. think about the family that is hurting right now. You should be ashamed of yourselves

        • Tinky

          Never speak ill of the dead, eh Eddie?

          See Glenn Greenwald’s article linked in my response to Ray below.

          • Bob C

            It takes a small person to speak ill of people who can no longer defend themselves. Actually, coward would be a better word. If you had an axe to grind with Noe, why didn’t you do when he was alive? Same goes for M.C.

          • Marshall Cassidy

            I did.

    • mwino63

      obviously you have no clue what you are talking about.

  • Barry Irwin

    Say what you will about him, at least he knew the game inside and out, which unfortunately is more than you can say for an alarmingly large number of today’s racing executives. He reminded me of a lot of men of his era: if he liked you, the road was paved and non-stop, but if he didn’t, then the road had sink holes and sometimes people fell into them.

    • oldbay

      Funny because he did actually pave all of Calder and all of Belmont. Paving not preferred surface of loose horse running around a back side. Saw a lot of nasty road rashes. I heard he didn’t like to get his shoes dirty.

    • Tinky

      “… if he liked you, the road was paved and non-stop, but if he didn’t, then the road had sink holes and sometimes people fell into them”

      I would add that this approach was not only used by other men of Noe’s era, but also by every dictator in the history of the world.

      • RayPaulick

        Tinky, I sometimes agree with you and sometimes disagree with you. I am appalled that you would use this time to be so vicious.

        • Tinky

          If this were about a private individual, I wouldn’t have said a word. Those in the public eye, however, and especially controversial figures (which Noe unquestionably was), should not (for many reasons) be treated with the same reflexive deference.

          While the analogy isn’t perfectly taut, Margaret Thatcher’s recent death provides an excellent illustration of the point, and Glenn Greenwald illuminated the point exceptionally well in the linked Guardian (U.K.) article below.

          I neither doubt, nor deny that Noe had positive qualities, and some on this thread have touched on them. But the notion that because someone has died, and again, especially a polarizing public figure, no criticism should be voiced, is deeply misguided in my view.

          Greenwald’s article:

          http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/apr/08/margaret-thatcher-death-etiquette

          • buckpasser

            Calder was paved before KN came. The Chief was the man. He would pick up a coffee cup while driving by the stable area. RIP.

  • Rob W.

    I worked for Kenny for 10 years. He was the best racing official I have ever known. He was tough and old school but we sure could use a few like him today. We called him “the Chief”. The people that had a problem with him or write negative posts about him, especially given the fact he has been retired for many years, were most probably cheaters or had cheap-ass horses. RIP

  • David

    Involved directly, tangentially or whatever, this business does tend to bring out the best and worst. I knew Kenny Noe and saw what I feel was a good man. Hard boot, old school, opportunistic, right-place-right time, to note a few thoughts but a good man. RIP Kenny.

  • Tim Ritvo

    Ken Noe Jr. was a remarkable man, if we had never met him my wife Kathy may have never made it, he was instrumental in getting us into the right hands at the Jackson Memorial Hosiptal, may he rest in peace knowing that he helped in saving someones life. Words cannot adeguatly express our gratitude. He didn’t hesitate when someone was in need.
    I raced under his leadership for ten years and if you played by the rules you never had an issue Florida racing has never been the same since he left. Calder has never been the same after his leadership was gone.

  • Sue M. Chapman

    Noe was a cruel man who made the lives of all but his “favorites” a living hell. Under his reign of terror, one never knew the day you would be terminated. He was heartless both to people and horses. Sorry, Ray, he is not well remembered.

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