Bin Suroor’s Stable Receives ‘All Clear’; Seven More Positives from Al Zarooni’s Yard

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Mahmood al Zarooni Mahmood al Zarooni

Following the Disciplinary Panel enquiry of 25th April 2013 into the administration of anabolic steroids by Mahmood Al Zarooni, the British Horseracing Authority (BHA) confirmed that it would be conducting tests on all Godolphin-owned horses in training in Newmarket, including those at Moulton Paddocks (the yard formerly licensed to Mahmood Al Zarooni) as well as horses trained by Saeed bin Suroor.

Between 29th April and 2nd May blood samples were taken from 391 horses and sent for analysis at HFL Sport Science. The BHA has now received written confirmation from the laboratory that analysis of the samples from horses based at Moulton Paddocks identified seven further positive tests for stanozolol, an anabolic steroid and therefore a prohibited substance under the Rules of Racing. All of the horses under the care and control of Saeed bin Suroor tested negative.

The names of the seven horses based at Moulton Paddocks are:

ENCKE (USA)
ENERGIZER (GER)
GENIUS BEAST (USA)
IMPROVISATION (IRE)
STAMFORD
STEELER (IRE)
ZIP TOP (IRE)

Godolphin and, via his solicitors, Mahmood Al Zarooni have been informed of the test results. Both Godolphin and Mahmood Al Zarooni have also been notified that they have the option within the Rules to ask that the relevant samples be subjected to B sample analysis. Both parties have until Thursday 23rd May to confirm if they wish to take up this option.

In line with the restrictions imposed on the 15 horses identified as having been administered anabolic steroids in the initial investigation, and subject to confirmation should the B samples be sent for counter-analysis, the seven horses will be suspended from running in Britain for a period of six months from the date the samples were taken. As such the above horses would not be permitted to resume racing until 29th October 2013. Any of these horses may be subjected to further sampling, as directed by the BHA, prior to them resuming racing.

The BHA has also notified Godolphin that the application for Saeed bin Suroor to take charge of Moulton Paddocks will now be processed. Under the Rules of Racing, horses must be in the care of a licensed trainer for 14 days before they are permitted to run.

Following the eight year disqualification awarded by the Disciplinary Panel, Mahmood Al Zarooni lodged an appeal against the severity of the penalty. No date has been set for the Appeal Board hearing as yet but the BHA can confirm that it will not take place until the final week in June, at the earliest.

Adam Brickell, Director of Integrity, Legal and Risk for the BHA, said:

“We will not be taking any separate action in respect of these additional positive results whilst Mr Al Zarooni’s appeal process is on-going.

“In the meantime, the latest findings from HFL Sport Science will form the subject of further interviews as part of the BHA’s continuing investigation. From the outset, one of the aims of the investigation, in addition to trying to understand the environment within which such serious breaches came to be committed, has been to identify what measures are needed to ensure the yard operates in accordance with the Rules in future. The findings will be shared with Godolphin and will also assist the BHA with regard to the future licensing of the yard.”

Paul Bittar, Chief Executive of BHA, said:

“These test results endorse the swift action and measures taken by the BHA in this matter. Whatever the outcome of his appeal before the independent Appeal Board, the gravity and scale of the infringements warranted Mahmood Al Zarooni being removed from control of the yard as quickly as possible.

“We welcome the news that Saeed bin Suroor’s horses tested negative and this clears the way for him to now take charge of Moulton Paddocks.”

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  • ManuelB

    One solution for curbing illegal drug use in North America is to follow the European example of suspending the horses involved. The should then force owners to confront their trainers about what is being done to their horses.

  • Don Reed

    “Seven More Positives” would be a great name for a racehorse.

  • salthebarber

    I will praise the BHA for publishing these results in a timely fashion. It does tend to enforce the image of clean racing in the U.K.

  • Richard C

    Three of the runners have been renamed — Sosa, McGwire, Bonds.

    • bruce walker

      you forgot A-Rod!

  • Smitty

    My God a governing body that actually has some power and ability to do something.Against one of the most powerfull people in racing,and not back off.I bet their salleries are no where near those of all the such groups in Racicng here.And look at their ability to get anything done!

  • jorge

    Steroids and shock wave machines. Standard equipment with European trainers

    • G. Rarick

      Where are you getting your information? Have you not been paying attention? Steroids will cost you your license, and for a very long time (in France, for life). Trainers here (in Europe) generally don’t take that kind of risk.

  • Mimi Hunter

    Would be nice if the rules were made uniform track to track, and then, horror of horrors, actually enforced. Either that or just throw all the rules out and have the trainer give a list of the drugs the horse is on, and let the public decide what the effect would be on the horse, :-D

  • salthebarber

    Don, this is the same reason why the game has been reluctant to ban drugs on raceday and probably is the reason why the game has historically turned a blind eye to enforcement.

  • Matt

    Thats the best rebuttal that you can muster? Suspending horses from competition would force owners to think very carefully about their choice of trainers.

  • salthebarber

    Barry, honestly, can an experienced horseperson discern if his/her horses are on steroids? Back in the day when drugging was rampant a Suffolk Downs, the differencei in the demeanor and look of the horses claimed by suspected trainer was quite obvious. Would this not be true for steroid use?

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