Senate committee unveils witness list for hearing on horse racing

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Chairman John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV today announced the witnesses testifying at the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing this week on “Medication and Performance Enhancing Drugs in Horse Racing.” This hearing will examine the prevalence and use of medications and performance enhancing drugs in horse racing.

Medication and Performance Enhancing Drugs in Horse Racing
Full Committee Hearing


Date: Thursday, July 12, 2012
Hearing Start Time: 2:30 p.m.
Location: Room 253, Russell Senate Office Building


Witness List

Panel 1
:
Mr. Barry Irwin, Chief Executive Officer, Team Valor International

Mr. Kent H. Stirling, Executive Director, Florida Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association Chairman, Medication Committee, National Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association

Mr. Jeffrey Gural, Chairman, Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Chairman and Managing Partner, American Racing and Entertainment, LLC

Mr. Jim Gagliano, President, The Jockey Club

Panel 2
:
Mr. Matthew Witman, National Director, American Quarter Horse Association

Mr. Marc Paulhus, Former Director of Equine Protection and Vice President, Humane Society

Mr. Ed Martin, President and CEO, Association of Racing Commissioners International

Dr. Sheila Lyons, DVM, Founder and Director, The American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Founder and Director, Homecoming Farm, Inc.

Please note the hearing will be webcast live via the Senate Commerce Committee website.  Refresh the Commerce Committee homepage 10 minutes prior to the scheduled start time to automatically begin streaming the webcast.

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  • Gfpowell

    Could we possibly be making progress?

    • Rick Brasher

      Not one person who is on a day to day basis of working in the trenches! This panel has no idea what transpiers on the backside of a racetrack!

      • Charlie Davis

        I think a vet is a great person to testify on the effects of the various drugs.  An owner also brings a great perspective because they’re a huge shareholder in the game and actually buy and pay expenses for the animals we’re discussing.  Gagliano and Gural are both intimately familiar with the industry from their various perspectives.  The HBPA represents horsemen.  

        Who else do you think should be on the panel?  

        • FourCats

          A vet is a great person to testify.  But only one of the witnesses is listed as a vet.  What qualifications do any of the other witnesses have to discuss this issue?  All of the witnesses should be vets as vets are the only ones trained to understand the effects of medication on a horse’s health.

        • Rick Brasher

          How about this panel:
          Regulators Tino Rieger Ok, John Ward Ky
          Trainers Dale Romans, Bill Mott and O/T Bart Evans
          Owners Maggie Moss and Carl Moore
          Vets Ken Reed Ky and Milton McClure La

          • Charlie Davis

            Regulators Tino Rieger Ok, John Ward Ky I think Ed Martin covers for the regulators 

            Trainers Dale Romans, Bill Mott and O/T Bart Evans 
            I do think there should be a trainer represented.

            Owners Maggie Moss and Carl Moore
            Maggie Moss, the one who said she would leave the game if Lasix was made illegal?  The one who says that illegal drugs are the biggest issue in horse racing yet never threatened to leave the game because of them?  I’ll pass on her. No opinion on Carl Moore, but I think Irwin is a good representative of the owners.

            Vets Ken Reed Ky and Milton McClure La 
            We already have a vet, and one who isn’t paid based on how she treats horses.  I think that’s a much more unbiased type of person to have testify.

        • ziggypop

           Then they should have brought in Mosses, or Tweedy, or Jacksons.

        • Stanley inman

          Someone to represent the HORSE,
          (Don’t tell me horsemen, vet, hbpa, tjc;
          They all make a living off the horse, thus should be recused.)

          • NY Owner

            Besides the vice president of the Humane Society?

          • Stanley inman

            Yes,
            they conflate their organization’s needs with their subjects.

        • cepatton28

          The panel should be made up of veterinarians who practice on the racetrack and of course owners and trainers from every aspect of the game. 

          • Charlie Davis

            You mean vets who make money by administering drugs to horses?  That doesn’t make sense to me.  That’s like asking a committee made up of soda company executives to testify on the health benefits of soda.  

          • cepatton28

            Not all the drugs are detrimental to the horse. Their opinion should be heard. Why use vets with no practical knowledge of how the racetrack operates.

      • ziggypop

         Exactly, these senators really don’t know and really don’t care.

  • Gfpowell

    Could we possibly be making progress?

  • Rick Brasher

    Not one person who is on a day to day basis of working in the trenches! This panel has no idea what transpiers on the backside of a racetrack!

  • Charlie Davis

    I think a vet is a great person to testify on the effects of the various drugs.  An owner also brings a great perspective because they’re a huge shareholder in the game and actually buy and pay expenses for the animals we’re discussing.  Gagliano and Gural are both intimately familiar with the industry from their various perspectives.  The HBPA represents horsemen.  

    Who else do you think should be on the panel?  

  • FourCats

    A vet is a great person to testify.  But only one of the witnesses is listed as a vet.  What qualifications do any of the other witnesses have to discuss this issue?  All of the witnesses should be vets as vets are the only ones trained to understand the effects of medication on a horse’s health.

  • Triplecrownquest

    The US Government’s involvement in Horse Racing will ONLY further damage the industry.   ANYONE that believes otherwise is foolish.

    • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

      FOOL IS WHAT u & your mouth is…PERIOD…

    • Kris

      Triplecrownquest is absolutely correct:  No good will come from this Senate hearing.  Horse racing had a timeframe after the Eight Belles tragedy to at least begin bringing order to this mess of a sport, however, in predictable fashion they dropped the ball completely.  The leaders of this sport didn’t even place the bar too low; they placed the bar on the floor and tripped over it.

  • Triplecrownquest

    The US Government’s involvement in Horse Racing will ONLY further damage the industry.   ANYONE that believes otherwise is foolish.

  • David

    Yes, you’ve got some who have something to say but, so
    what?  The problem isn’t having authoritative
    sources voice opinions, it’s that even if you reach a consensus, no one, NO
    ONE, is capable of doing anything about it.

  • David

    Yes, you’ve got some who have something to say but, so
    what?  The problem isn’t having authoritative
    sources voice opinions, it’s that even if you reach a consensus, no one, NO
    ONE, is capable of doing anything about it.

  • Big Red

    Barry Irwin ? Really ???
    If winning the Derby makes you an expert witness then where is Chip Wooley ?

    I picture the questioning to go like this:

    Rockefeller: Mr Irwin, do your horses use lasix?
    Irwin: Yes, but they are all liars, they don’t really bleed

    Rockefeller: Do all trainers use lasix ?
    Irwin: Yes, but they too are all liars. Do you know some feed their horses green frogs?

    Rockefeller: Does your trainer want to keep using lasix?
    Irwin: Yes, but I think he’s lying. You know how those Brit’s are.

    Rockefeller: Do you know Maggie Moss ?
    Irwin: Yes, I asked her out once and she said she was busy, something about having to wash her hair, but I think she was lying.

    Rockefeller: Mr Irwin, why are you here?
    Irwin: I heard there was a free lunch ! 

    • Don Reed

      I’m so along in years, and this current generation of Rockefellers are so low profile, I had trouble understanding this until I realized that it wasn’t Nelson grilling Hale Irwin, the professional golfer.  Then I got out of the sand trap.

      • Don Reed (Bad Typist)

        Tripped over my keyboard yet again.  Please make that, “this current generation of Rockefellers is so low-profile…”

        • Don Reed

          But do note that a slight improvement has been achieved.  Long ago, a teacher handed back a graded history
          paper, emblazoned with individual red ink edits circled around every instance
          of my having typed the word, “Rockerfeller.”

  • Big Red

    Barry Irwin ? Really ???
    If winning the Derby makes you an expert witness then where is Chip Wooley ?

    I picture the questioning to go like this:

    Rockefeller: Mr Irwin, do your horses use lasix?
    Irwin: Yes, but they are all liars, they don’t really bleed

    Rockefeller: Do all trainers use lasix ?
    Irwin: Yes, but they too are all liars. Do you know some feed their horses green frogs?

    Rockefeller: Does your trainer want to keep using lasix?
    Irwin: Yes, but I think he’s lying. You know how those Brit’s are.

    Rockefeller: Do you know Maggie Moss ?
    Irwin: Yes, I asked her out once and she said she was busy, something about having to wash her hair, but I think she was lying.

    Rockefeller: Mr Irwin, why are you here?
    Irwin: I heard there was a free lunch ! 

  • FE Davidson

    The witness list reflects the lack of insight with which the Committee is armed.  With the exception of Barry Irwin, it’s clear that the Committee will not ascertain the type of insight needed to address the industry’s woes.  The other witnesses are likely more programmed to defend the integrity of the industry, than to expose the day-to-day issues encountered by the participants.  The general lack of witnesses whose financial well-being is based upon the performance of their horses and who encounter the cheaters, as competition, on a daily basis underscores the fact that this “hearing” is meant solely to score political points so that the Committee can say that they’ve formally addressed the issue.

    If there’s a silver lining, it should rest on the backs of those who are motivated by the hearing to ensure that more is done to expose what’s really happening and pressure those in a position of authority to take action or be embarassed by their nonfeasance.

    • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

      Amen…ITS A START to cleaning the FILTH UP…PERIOD…

  • FE Davidson

    The witness list reflects the lack of insight with which the Committee is armed.  With the exception of Barry Irwin, it’s clear that the Committee will not ascertain the type of insight needed to address the industry’s woes.  The other witnesses are likely more programmed to defend the integrity of the industry, than to expose the day-to-day issues encountered by the participants.  The general lack of witnesses whose financial well-being is based upon the performance of their horses and who encounter the cheaters, as competition, on a daily basis underscores the fact that this “hearing” is meant solely to score political points so that the Committee can say that they’ve formally addressed the issue.

    If there’s a silver lining, it should rest on the backs of those who are motivated by the hearing to ensure that more is done to expose what’s really happening and pressure those in a position of authority to take action or be embarassed by their nonfeasance.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/22NMCXRUWRKTKGNIG3HJBVJPQI Alex

    Three executives, one vet…

    • ziggypop

       They stacked the deck, didn’t they?

      • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

        looks a little FI$HY…U think???…

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/22NMCXRUWRKTKGNIG3HJBVJPQI Alex

    Three executives, one vet…

  • Amongooseamongus

    Just think, if they called Doug O’Neill, they could have gotten “up close and personal” with the source of the problem, first hand, wouldn’t you say?

  • Amongooseamongus

    Just think, if they called Doug O’Neill, they could have gotten “up close and personal” with the source of the problem, first hand, wouldn’t you say?

  • Rick Brasher

    How about this panel:
    Regulators Tino Rieger Ok, John Ward Ky
    Trainers Dale Romans, Bill Mott and O/T Bart Evans
    Owners Maggie Moss and Carl Moore
    Vets Ken Reed Ky and Milton McClure La

  • ziggypop

     Then they should have brought in Mosses, or Tweedy, or Jacksons.

  • ziggypop

     They stacked the deck, didn’t they?

  • ziggypop

     Exactly, these senators really don’t know and really don’t care.

  • ziggypop

    They are going through the motion, feigning care. After watching a senate committee all but give Jamie Dimon a bj, and with so many 1%ers in the game, it will be a gratuitous waste of everybody’s time.

  • ziggypop

    They are going through the motion, feigning care. After watching a senate committee all but give Jamie Dimon a bj, and with so many 1%ers in the game, it will be a gratuitous waste of everybody’s time.

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    the only FOOL I hear is u…& a DUMB @SS to boot…GUAFB!!!…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    the only FOOL I hear here is u…& a DUMB @SS to BOOT…GUAFB!!!…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    Amen…ITS A START to cleaning the FILTH UP…PERIOD…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    u r the ONLY FOOL I HEAR…& a DUMB @SS to BOOT…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    FBI/DEA???…THEY KNOW!!!…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    FBI/DEA???…THEY KNOW!!!…

  • Chip Wiley

    Did Glenn Thompson RSVP No ?

  • Chip Wiley

    Did Glenn Thompson RSVP No ?

  • Stanley inman

    Someone to represent the HORSE,
    (Don’t tell me horsemen, vet, hbpa, tjc;
    They all make a living off the horse, thus should be recused.)

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/GN75TMMTTZCDAKCKWH4QH6RDYQ Ronald T

    Okay..Everybody take a seat……..It’s time for the regular dog and pony show starring the usual suspects……..After this so called hearing they can all go outside and tell each other how wonderful they all are …..At least they’ll get a free lunch and they should create enough hot air to fill the Goodyear blimp……

    • Perks

      My feelings too, they could have done better with the witness list.  Should of invited a few of those bad test people as well. 

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/GN75TMMTTZCDAKCKWH4QH6RDYQ Ronald T

    Okay..Everybody take a seat……..It’s time for the regular dog and pony show starring the usual suspects……..After this so called hearing they can all go outside and tell each other how wonderful they all are …..At least they’ll get a free lunch and they should create enough hot air to fill the Goodyear blimp……

  • Bryan Langlois (ShelterDoc)

    Hmm…think anyone will take the fifth on the advise of their lawyer?? (just kidding).  It will be interesting to see what the QH guy says.  I personally would have liked to see some vets called who have actually done the research on some of these drugs and what their effects are based on their research.  At the very least they could have called Dr. Scolay who was the one who set up the injury database and probably would have some data on drug amounts in horses or necropsy results on horses who have died on the track.  Something scientific to base it on. 

    And wait a minute…they give free lunches to those testifying?  Nice to see my tax dollars are really going to those that need it…

  • Bryan Langlois (ShelterDoc)

    Hmm…think anyone will take the fifth on the advise of their lawyer?? (just kidding).  It will be interesting to see what the QH guy says.  I personally would have liked to see some vets called who have actually done the research on some of these drugs and what their effects are based on their research.  At the very least they could have called Dr. Scolay who was the one who set up the injury database and probably would have some data on drug amounts in horses or necropsy results on horses who have died on the track.  Something scientific to base it on. 

    And wait a minute…they give free lunches to those testifying?  Nice to see my tax dollars are really going to those that need it…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    FOOL IS WHAT u & your mouth is…PERIOD…

  • NY Owner

    Besides the vice president of the Humane Society?

  • Perks

    My feelings too, they could have done better with the witness list.  Should of invited a few of those bad test people as well. 

  • andy

    I’m probably being way too hopeful but people said the exact same thing about the hearings on steriods in baseball — just a dog and  pony show for the politicians. But the hearings actually spurred action by MLB, helped to clean up the game  and embarrassed a number of players.  I doubt the same thing will happen here, but one can always hope.

    I agree they should have included at least one huge bettor representing the horseplayers who are fed up with the nonsense and voting with our wallets to stop supporting the sport.

  • andy

    I’m probably being way too hopeful but people said the exact same thing about the hearings on steriods in baseball — just a dog and  pony show for the politicians. But the hearings actually spurred action by MLB, helped to clean up the game  and embarrassed a number of players.  I doubt the same thing will happen here, but one can always hope.

    I agree they should have included at least one huge bettor representing the horseplayers who are fed up with the nonsense and voting with our wallets to stop supporting the sport.

  • cepatton28

    The panel should be made up of veterinarians who practice on the racetrack and of course owners and trainers from every aspect of the game. 

  • The Prof

    It will be like the MLB hearings:  “No, Senator, we in the game don’t use steroids, or even  frog juice.”

    How about some people who worked in the industry but no longer rely on it for their living?  Such as recently RETIRED vets who might know what’s going on but are not a part of it?  Or recently RETIRED trainers who just maybe got out of the business because they wouldn’t “use,” and therefore couldn’t compete with those who do?  Same for one-time owners?  And where is an Andy Beyer or Steve Crist to represent the fans whose betting drives the industry?

  • The Prof

    It will be like the MLB hearings:  “No, Senator, we in the game don’t use steroids, or even  frog juice.”

    How about some people who worked in the industry but no longer rely on it for their living?  Such as recently RETIRED vets who might know what’s going on but are not a part of it?  Or recently RETIRED trainers who just maybe got out of the business because they wouldn’t “use,” and therefore couldn’t compete with those who do?  Same for one-time owners?  And where is an Andy Beyer or Steve Crist to represent the fans whose betting drives the industry?

  • Concerned Observer

    Guess I am getting old. Have seen and followed lots of senate hearings.

    I remember when:

    The Tobacco execs testified that cigaettes were not harmful and nicotine was not addictive.

    When the bankers testified that people really did not want or need to know the actual  interest rates on the loans they were taking.

    When mine owners testified that mine safety measures would not work (deaths dropped from 2000/yr. to 50/yr.)

    When car dealers testified that rolling back speedometers was of great benefit to the used car buyers.

    Yep. Been there….and seen the results. All of them still in business despite legislation they said would put them under.

    Is there a parallel here?

  • Concerned Observer

    Guess I am getting old. Have seen and followed lots of senate hearings.

    I remember when:

    The Tobacco execs testified that cigaettes were not harmful and nicotine was not addictive.

    When the bankers testified that people really did not want or need to know the actual  interest rates on the loans they were taking.

    When mine owners testified that mine safety measures would not work (deaths dropped from 2000/yr. to 50/yr.)

    When car dealers testified that rolling back speedometers was of great benefit to the used car buyers.

    Yep. Been there….and seen the results. All of them still in business despite legislation they said would put them under.

    Is there a parallel here?

  • FE Davidson

    The 22 April 1981 Sarasota Hearld-Tribune article (cited by Ray in a tweet earlier this morning) about the then-current underhanded dealings on and around the race track is an excellent read.  It underscores the inherent conflicts of interest in the industry, the basis for state racing commissions’ failure to act, and unfortuntely relates the recollections of a convicted felon in witness protection who claims to have fixed thousands of races, using tactics that are still employed to this day.

    Some of more interesting quotes state,

    “Racing’s overseers – state racing boards – largely have failed to respond.” 

    “UPI questioned present and former racing commissioners, laboratory chemists, horse owners, track officials, trainers, veterinarians, law enforcement officers, federal officials and humane societies.  Some feared reprisals in employment or in more subtle ways at the track.  Others feared for the sport’s image.”

    “Actual and potential conflicts of interest abound.  Many racing commissioners are horse breeders. Chairmen of the Kentucky, California and Louisiana commissions run their horses in their own states.  Other commissioners bet at races.  Veterinarians commonly own and race horses against those they treat.”

    “…the drugging problem has turned up a ‘great reluctance on the part of virtually every racing commission to expose wrongdoers.” (attributed to Marc Paulhus, one of the witnesses on Panel 2).

    “The state commissions simply don’t want to deal with a scandal of the proportions that would result from enforcement….state regulators are partners in racing; a portion of every dollar wagered goes to the state.” (Paulhus arguing for federal intervention).

    “…the Drug Enforcement Administration, which monitors use of narcotics, calls it a low priority.”

    At the time of the article, the convicted felon was in the witness protection program, fearing that his accomplices would kill to silence him.

    So, it’s now 31 years later and the landscape appears to be essentially unchanged.  However, now the cheaters have greater access to high-tech compounding pharmacists/chemists; the price to “pull a horse”, as referenced in the article, probably hasn’t changed much; the sabotaging of the competition continues; and, the reprisals for whistleblowing remain a deterrent to exposing the misdeeds.

    What has changed?  The stakes are significantly higher; there’s more money to steal, or siphon off as the article put it; but, more importantly, the internet has provided a forum like this for the sharing of ideas and the gathering of support amongst those emboldened enough to do something about it.  As Thomas Jefferson said, “A little rebellion now and then is a good thing and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical.”  “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.  It is its natural manure.”  It’s time to man up and take control from those who purposefully ignore the cheating; it’s time to expose the cheaters for who they are and what they do.  If you can’t beat them financially, you can potentially embarass them in these times of political correctness to at least give a second thought to the potential consequences of ignoring a cancer that’s eating every last cell of the industry.   Perhaps, one by one, each of us can make a dent in the machine that has plagued the industry since its inception and one by one watch the tyrants fall from grace.

    Clearly, the federal government is not the answer, but it’s at least providing a temporary stage from which to move forward.  Use it as an opportunity to speak up and be heard!  Let the pen be mightier than the sword.

    • Stanley inman

      So true,
      Beat the drum to start the battle
      to embarrass our leaders.

  • FE Davidson

    The 22 April 1981 Sarasota Hearld-Tribune article (cited by Ray in a tweet earlier this morning) about the then-current underhanded dealings on and around the race track is an excellent read.  It underscores the inherent conflicts of interest in the industry, the basis for state racing commissions’ failure to act, and unfortuntely relates the recollections of a convicted felon in witness protection who claims to have fixed thousands of races, using tactics that are still employed to this day.

    Some of more interesting quotes state,

    “Racing’s overseers – state racing boards – largely have failed to respond.” 

    “UPI questioned present and former racing commissioners, laboratory chemists, horse owners, track officials, trainers, veterinarians, law enforcement officers, federal officials and humane societies.  Some feared reprisals in employment or in more subtle ways at the track.  Others feared for the sport’s image.”

    “Actual and potential conflicts of interest abound.  Many racing commissioners are horse breeders. Chairmen of the Kentucky, California and Louisiana commissions run their horses in their own states.  Other commissioners bet at races.  Veterinarians commonly own and race horses against those they treat.”

    “…the drugging problem has turned up a ‘great reluctance on the part of virtually every racing commission to expose wrongdoers.” (attributed to Marc Paulhus, one of the witnesses on Panel 2).

    “The state commissions simply don’t want to deal with a scandal of the proportions that would result from enforcement….state regulators are partners in racing; a portion of every dollar wagered goes to the state.” (Paulhus arguing for federal intervention).

    “…the Drug Enforcement Administration, which monitors use of narcotics, calls it a low priority.”

    At the time of the article, the convicted felon was in the witness protection program, fearing that his accomplices would kill to silence him.

    So, it’s now 31 years later and the landscape appears to be essentially unchanged.  However, now the cheaters have greater access to high-tech compounding pharmacists/chemists; the price to “pull a horse”, as referenced in the article, probably hasn’t changed much; the sabotaging of the competition continues; and, the reprisals for whistleblowing remain a deterrent to exposing the misdeeds.

    What has changed?  The stakes are significantly higher; there’s more money to steal, or siphon off as the article put it; but, more importantly, the internet has provided a forum like this for the sharing of ideas and the gathering of support amongst those emboldened enough to do something about it.  As Thomas Jefferson said, “A little rebellion now and then is a good thing and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical.”  “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.  It is its natural manure.”  It’s time to man up and take control from those who purposefully ignore the cheating; it’s time to expose the cheaters for who they are and what they do.  If you can’t beat them financially, you can potentially embarass them in these times of political correctness to at least give a second thought to the potential consequences of ignoring a cancer that’s eating every last cell of the industry.   Perhaps, one by one, each of us can make a dent in the machine that has plagued the industry since its inception and one by one watch the tyrants fall from grace.

    Clearly, the federal government is not the answer, but it’s at least providing a temporary stage from which to move forward.  Use it as an opportunity to speak up and be heard!  Let the pen be mightier than the sword.

  • Andon

    Don’t think the Humane Society doesn’t have an agenda all their own too, being part of this.  There is so much controversial nonsense surrounding them too; it’s not all about the horses for them either, and the more you look, the less they actually speak FOR the animals and the more they line their pockets.  They spend more on smear campaigns and salaries than they do on welfare programs.
    Maybe they should be bringing vets and professionals in from jurisdictions that DON’T currently use lasix or allow the same levels of meds NA racing does…Australia, NZ, England maybe?  It obviously CAN be done, and if it means an overhaul of the trainers and methods used here, then so be it.  Maybe that’s what needs to happen to move away from young speed horses who retire as late 3 yo to perpetuate weak constitution, or worse yet breakdown.  Something needs to counter the emphasis placed on 2 yo racing in north America, on the dependency for medications to carry horses through their l24 month careers (if they are lucky).  A good shakeup is needed to start supporting long term goals instead of short term successes.  Not sure what this particular panel will do, but it’s a start…

  • Andon

    Don’t think the Humane Society doesn’t have an agenda all their own too, being part of this.  There is so much controversial nonsense surrounding them too; it’s not all about the horses for them either, and the more you look, the less they actually speak FOR the animals and the more they line their pockets.  They spend more on smear campaigns and salaries than they do on welfare programs.
    Maybe they should be bringing vets and professionals in from jurisdictions that DON’T currently use lasix or allow the same levels of meds NA racing does…Australia, NZ, England maybe?  It obviously CAN be done, and if it means an overhaul of the trainers and methods used here, then so be it.  Maybe that’s what needs to happen to move away from young speed horses who retire as late 3 yo to perpetuate weak constitution, or worse yet breakdown.  Something needs to counter the emphasis placed on 2 yo racing in north America, on the dependency for medications to carry horses through their l24 month careers (if they are lucky).  A good shakeup is needed to start supporting long term goals instead of short term successes.  Not sure what this particular panel will do, but it’s a start…

  • Charlie Davis

    You mean vets who make money by administering drugs to horses?  That doesn’t make sense to me.  That’s like asking a committee made up of soda company executives to testify on the health benefits of soda.  

  • Charlie Davis

    Regulators Tino Rieger Ok, John Ward Ky I think Ed Martin covers for the regulators 

    Trainers Dale Romans, Bill Mott and O/T Bart Evans 
    I do think there should be a trainer represented.

    Owners Maggie Moss and Carl Moore
    Maggie Moss, the one who said she would leave the game if Lasix was made illegal?  The one who says that illegal drugs are the biggest issue in horse racing yet never threatened to leave the game because of them?  I’ll pass on her. No opinion on Carl Moore, but I think Irwin is a good representative of the owners.

    Vets Ken Reed Ky and Milton McClure La 
    We already have a vet, and one who isn’t paid based on how she treats horses.  I think that’s a much more unbiased type of person to have testify.

  • Kris

    Triplecrownquest is absolutely correct:  No good will come from this Senate hearing.  Horse racing had a timeframe after the Eight Belles tragedy to at least begin bringing order to this mess of a sport, however, in predictable fashion they dropped the ball completely.  The leaders of this sport didn’t even place the bar too low; they placed the bar on the floor and tripped over it.

  • Stanley inman

    Yes,
    they conflate their organization’s needs with their subjects.

  • Stanley inman

    So true,
    Beat the drum to start the battle
    to embarrass our leaders.

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    looks a little FI$HY…U think???…

  • Sampan

    I’m looking forward to this hearing and I think panel 2 will have the most accurate concise and unbiased view towards helping to resolve the drug issue in horse racing.
    The drug issues in other sports and the workplace seem to be going the same route.
    I’m going to follow this very intently as I think we may have an opportunity to make some headway in our sport and business. 

  • Sampan

    I’m looking forward to this hearing and I think panel 2 will have the most accurate concise and unbiased view towards helping to resolve the drug issue in horse racing.
    The drug issues in other sports and the workplace seem to be going the same route.
    I’m going to follow this very intently as I think we may have an opportunity to make some headway in our sport and business. 

  • Don Reed

    If the Senate and the House of Representatives unmercifully grilled the bank & related Wall Street CEOs as the result of the 2008 crash, with the result being that they’ve all been given a free ride…

    What possible reason is there to take THESE proceedings seriously? 

  • Don Reed

    If the Senate and the House of Representatives unmercifully grilled the bank & related Wall Street CEOs as the result of the 2008 crash, with the result being that they’ve all been given a free ride…

    What possible reason is there to take THESE proceedings seriously? 

  • Don Reed

    Just in case Doug O’Neill (on vaco via days) gets any heat from this, here’s Plan A:

    Attorney General Holder takes his summer vacation;

    O’Neill gets slotted in as Holder’s vacation relief;

    The House supeonas O’Neill; DO’N ignores them;

    O’Neill is held in Contempt of Congress by a majority vote;

    Congress refers the case to a District Attorney, who then declines to indict his own (temporary) boss.

    And O’Neill’s off the hook.  Ta Da.

    Say, doesn’t this game plan look just like the current racing procedures (trainers getting wrist slaps for violations of the rules)?

  • Don Reed

    Just in case Doug O’Neill (on vaco via days) gets any heat from this, here’s Plan A:

    Attorney General Holder takes his summer vacation;

    O’Neill gets slotted in as Holder’s vacation relief;

    The House supeonas O’Neill; DO’N ignores them;

    O’Neill is held in Contempt of Congress by a majority vote;

    Congress refers the case to a District Attorney, who then declines to indict his own (temporary) boss.

    And O’Neill’s off the hook.  Ta Da.

    Say, doesn’t this game plan look just like the current racing procedures (trainers getting wrist slaps for violations of the rules)?

  • cepatton28

    Not all the drugs are detrimental to the horse. Their opinion should be heard. Why use vets with no practical knowledge of how the racetrack operates.

  • Don Reed

    I’m so along in years, and this current generation of Rockefellers are so low profile, I had trouble understanding this until I realized that it wasn’t Nelson grilling Hale Irwin, the professional golfer.  Then I got out of the sand trap.

  • Don Reed (Bad Typist)

    Tripped over my keyboard yet again.  Please make that, “this current generation of Rockefellers is so low-profile…”

  • Don Reed

    But do note that a slight improvement has been achieved.  Long ago, a teacher handed back a graded history
    paper, emblazoned with individual red ink edits circled around every instance
    of my having typed the word, “Rockerfeller.”

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