Phipps, Janney: ‘Lasix is a performance enhancer’

  • click above & share!
    X
  • click above & share!
    X


  • click above & share!
    X
  • click above & share!
    X

Ogden Mills Phipps, longtime chairman of The Jockey Club, and Stuart S. Janney III, the Thoroughbred breed registry’s vice chairman, called the anti-bleeding medication Lasix a “performance enhancer” but defended their decision to allow their 3-year-olds to be given the drug this year after signing a pledge in 2012 that their 2-year-olds would race without the diuretic.

Responding to a letter to the editor of Thoroughbred Daily News written by Aron Wellman of Eclipse Thoroughbred Partners, which called their actions a “glaring contradiction” that created a “very dangerous scenario,” Phipps and Janney said they signed the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association pledge with more than 60 other owners to “demonstrate that horses could successfully be managed without the use of this performance-enhancing drug on race day.”

Wellman, who said he favors the continued use of the drug, pointed out that in recent weeks at Gulfstream Park, owners of horses who are racing 3-year-olds on Lasix after signing the 2-year-old pledge reads like a “Who’s Who” of the industry. “As a 35-year-old professional in this business,” he wrote, “I looked up to these owners and breeders for decades and placed my complete faith in them to guide our industry for the better. However, the mixed signal being sent by them on this all-important Lasix topic is confusing and extremely troubling.”

Last Saturday alone, Wellman pointed out, there were four winning 3-year-olds racing on Lasix who were not given the drug as juveniles.

Phipps and Janney said that is one reason they decided not to extend their 2012 pledge to their recently turned 3-year-olds of 2013. “While we look forward to the day that Lasix becomes a prohibited substance for all horses on race day,” they said in a letter to the editor of TDN, “we believe Lasix is a performance enhancer and it is necessary to be competitive in the current medication environment.”

Following is the complete text of their letter:


“Aron Wellman’s letter in the Jan. 30, 2013 edition of Thoroughbred Daily News made reference to the Thoroughbred owners who pledged to run their 2-year-olds without Lasix (furosemide) in 2012 and race those same horses, who are now 3-year-olds, with Lasix.

“As the owners of 3-year-olds that did not race on Lasix as 2-year-olds but are doing so now, we would like to provide an explanation of our thinking. We signed the TOBA pledge to race our 2-year-olds without Lasix primarily to demonstrate that horses could successfully be managed without the use of this performance-enhancing drug on race day.

“It was, and is, our hope that an experiment like this will help prove that a ban on Lasix for all horses would not result in the dire scenario some have predicted – for the horses or for the Thoroughbred business. Today, approximately 95% of all starts are made by horses who have been treated with Lasix. But that didn’t happen overnight; it happened gradually over a period of time.

“It would make sense to ban the use of Lasix on a gradual basis, as many of us have recommended, and the data derived as a result of the TOBA pledge will be useful in those considerations. While we look forward to the day that Lasix becomes a prohibited substance for all horses on race day, we believe Lasix is a performance enhancer and it is necessary to be competitive in the current medication environment.

“As owners, we race our horses in accordance with the rules in place at the jurisdictions in which they run, and Lasix is currently permitted on race day in all domestic racing jurisdictions. Until such time as the rules in this country are changed to conform to policies in most worldwide racing jurisdictions, only our 2-year-olds will compete without Lasix.”

New to the Paulick Report? Click here to sign up for our daily email newsletter to keep up on this and other stories happening in the Thoroughbred industry
  • Figless

    I totally agree with their views. Lasix ban should be enacted gradually, first in Graded Stakes Races, then two year olds, then non- graded stakes, etc. At a minimum, before the ban is extended past the Graded Stakes races, the four major racing states need to sign on, NY, CA, KY, and FL. It would be helpful to have more of course, but it will be tough to get LA and TX and PA on board.

    • Bonniemcdo

      Interesting post. I still want to know why every cheap claimer runs on lasix with very slow times. Are they all bleeders? Didn’t help them much. Maybe preclude any colt from being a sire that ran on Lasix. Also preclude the sale of a mare that ran on Lasix if she is to be used for breeding purposes.  Start with no Lasix in Grade ones and continue studies at several race tracks to see who bleeds and who does not and how Lasix affects horses. Just some thoughts. A  measured approach going forward would be good. 

  • Figless

    I totally agree with their views. Lasix ban should be enacted gradually, first in Graded Stakes Races, then two year olds, then non- graded stakes, etc. At a minimum, before the ban is extended past the Graded Stakes races, the four major racing states need to sign on, NY, CA, KY, and FL. It would be helpful to have more of course, but it will be tough to get LA and TX and PA on board.

  • concerned horseman

    so let me get this straight-lasix is a performance enhancing drug (ped) ,but is permitted, so I’ll keep using it so no one gets a competitive advantage over me, despite the fact that we all know that by definition a performance enhancing drug is not permitted on race day, this one is, hmmmmm. By the way,when will we get a test to detect myo-inositol pyro phosphate (itpp)-Good drug, surely a performance enhancer surely being used, marketed, pushed and no test for it here yet that i know about. Probably the best mover upper on the market, and safe too!We need funding funding and more funding to get this drug out of racing and level the playing field!!!!

  • concerned horseman

    so let me get this straight-lasix is a performance enhancing drug (ped) ,but is permitted, so I’ll keep using it so no one gets a competitive advantage over me, despite the fact that we all know that by definition a performance enhancing drug is not permitted on race day, this one is, hmmmmm. By the way,when will we get a test to detect myo-inositol pyro phosphate (itpp)-Good drug, surely a performance enhancer surely being used, marketed, pushed and no test for it here yet that i know about. Probably the best mover upper on the market, and safe too!We need funding funding and more funding to get this drug out of racing and level the playing field!!!!

  • AJ

    The contradiction is completely understandable, and it’s one that has been echoed by Graham Motion and Barry Irwin as well.  They can understand why there is an outcry, but they also believe it enhances performance and they are at a competitive disadvantage if they don’t use it.  

    Ray is on the right track – let’s cut the hyperbole, work together, and try to get on the same page.  But when the strong advocates FOR and AGAINST Lasix use cite that the alternative is cruel/inhumane/ruining the sport, you really can’t get very far, now can you?

  • AJ

    The contradiction is completely understandable, and it’s one that has been echoed by Graham Motion and Barry Irwin as well.  They can understand why there is an outcry, but they also believe it enhances performance and they are at a competitive disadvantage if they don’t use it.  

    Ray is on the right track – let’s cut the hyperbole, work together, and try to get on the same page.  But when the strong advocates FOR and AGAINST Lasix use cite that the alternative is cruel/inhumane/ruining the sport, you really can’t get very far, now can you?

  • Gregory A. Hall

    Here’s a video of Kentucky Horse Racing Commission Tracy Farmer answering basically the same question about his horses last year after the KHRC approved a lasix phase-out policy. http://goo.gl/7fglN

    • David

      Comes down to SOP or getting out.  Ethical and competitive individuals want to win and if that were
      taken out of the equation most would elect to quit.  Trainers and the Vets can’t afford enforced integrity even if it
      felt right.  Rub in this case is that the
      hill just got steeper.

  • Gregory A. Hall

    Here’s a video of Kentucky Horse Racing Commission Tracy Farmer answering basically the same question about his horses last year after the KHRC approved a lasix phase-out policy. http://goo.gl/7fglN

  • David

    Understand Mr. Phipps was once quite the tennis player and he
    no doubt appreciates the role technology has played in that sport and in
    golf.  Those sports have various
    international divisions and jurisdictions just like racing has state-by-state
    guidelines.  The difference is governing
    bodies have the power of review and can conclude a new super racquet or long
    putter is outside the lines.  Then, with
    best practice established, consensus is (gradually) achieved by adoption down
    the line.  The problem here is that,
    absent of governing bodies, racing must rely on peer pressure from the most influential
    participants in order to enact change.  This
    is a prime example of resignation and selfishness by individuals who (likely)
    believe their generation may be the last to enjoy a sport in decline.

  • David

    Understand Mr. Phipps was once quite the tennis player and he
    no doubt appreciates the role technology has played in that sport and in
    golf.  Those sports have various
    international divisions and jurisdictions just like racing has state-by-state
    guidelines.  The difference is governing
    bodies have the power of review and can conclude a new super racquet or long
    putter is outside the lines.  Then, with
    best practice established, consensus is (gradually) achieved by adoption down
    the line.  The problem here is that,
    absent of governing bodies, racing must rely on peer pressure from the most influential
    participants in order to enact change.  This
    is a prime example of resignation and selfishness by individuals who (likely)
    believe their generation may be the last to enjoy a sport in decline.

  • ZED

    Of course Salix is a performance enhancer, but no one wants to be the first through the wall and be bloodied by running their 3 year olds leading up to the Derby, do they? Better to win races than admit the truth. Really, so you ran your 2 year olds without Salix, BFD. Courage, gentlemen, means doing the right thing all the time, not just when it suits your racing schedule. Should you need further help digging deep into the well of hypocrisy, I understand Lance Armstrong is available to act as an industry spokesperson. 

    “Lead, follow or get out of the way” 

    • TJ

      You are right on with the Lance Armstrong analogy.  End of story.

  • ZED

    Of course Salix is a performance enhancer, but no one wants to be the first through the wall and be bloodied by running their 3 year olds leading up to the Derby, do they? Better to win races than admit the truth. Really, so you ran your 2 year olds without Salix, BFD. Courage, gentlemen, means doing the right thing all the time, not just when it suits your racing schedule. Should you need further help digging deep into the well of hypocrisy, I understand Lance Armstrong is available to act as an industry spokesperson. 

    “Lead, follow or get out of the way” 

  • Stanley inman

    Leadership?
    Leadership?
    Where.

    Give me the job for 5 minutes;
    We make an addendum to the
    Rules of racing, Rule 19
    No foal, whose sire or dam
    Used diuretic on raceday after
    January 1, 2014 eligible for
    Registration.
    The economic impact will mostly be carried by fillies, stallion prospects;
    Those who choose to use diuretics on raceday;
    To swim in that pool of ignominy For having used the needle
    for economic gain;
    Will benefit in the short run since the best blood will have to beat you-
    Spot you weight, when they run drug free.
    In the long run, the sport culls all
    Those (equine and other) who need
    The needle to win.
    Simple!
    (Do I get the job)
    So funny

    • Stanley inman

      The impact of this new rule
      Its consequence,
      will not be symmetric,
      Thus,
      owners uninterested in their horse’s salvage value
      (A high percentage of borses in training)
      Will have freedom to use raceday meds;
      No sudden drop in “horsemen’s standard of living”
      (We throw you a bone)
      Over time the entire breed becomes cleansed,
      Ready now to rejoin our peers as
      “world class” horsemen

      • Stanley inman

        “salvage value as breeding stock”

  • Stanley inman

    Leadership?
    Leadership?
    Where.

    Give me the job for 5 minutes;
    We make an addendum to the
    Rules of racing, Rule 19
    No foal, whose sire or dam
    Used diuretic on raceday after
    January 1, 2014 eligible for
    Registration.
    The economic impact will mostly be carried by fillies, stallion prospects;
    Those who choose to use diuretics on raceday;
    To swim in that pool of ignominy For having used the needle
    for economic gain;
    Will benefit in the short run since the best blood will have to beat you-
    Spot you weight, when they run drug free.
    In the long run, the sport culls all
    Those (equine and other) who need
    The needle to win.
    Simple!
    (Do I get the job)
    So funny

  • kyle

    The hysterics strike again. “Glaring contradiction.” Translation: They did exactly what they said they would – race their TWO YEAR OLDS lasix free. “Extremely dangerous,” to the status quo. They showed horses can race without lasix maybe just not as fast. And that even those that don’t bleed improve their performance with the addition. And that folks, is the real reason for its ubiquity. I ask,how is it possible to have a reasonable debate and hash out a true assessment of the affect of drugs in the game with people like this?

  • kyle

    The hysterics strike again. “Glaring contradiction.” Translation: They did exactly what they said they would – race their TWO YEAR OLDS lasix free. “Extremely dangerous,” to the status quo. They showed horses can race without lasix maybe just not as fast. And that even those that don’t bleed improve their performance with the addition. And that folks, is the real reason for its ubiquity. I ask,how is it possible to have a reasonable debate and hash out a true assessment of the affect of drugs in the game with people like this?

  • It’s the Ultimate Flip-Flop

    They can call it whatever they want to call it, it is the ultimate flip-flop. What happened to all their sputtering about “it’s ruining the breed” “we have to do what Europe does” “we have to get in step with the rest of the World” “No one will buy our horses” “Our horses will get dehydrated” “it’s bad for their bones” “it conceals other nasty drugs”.

    I guess they just can’t decide if it’s all about the HORSE, or is it all about WINNING.It’s very funny how the phrase “enhances performance” is used. Yes, Lasix allows a horse to breathe properly and to the best of it’s ability, therefore racing at it’s very best. Now why, if you call yourself a genuine horse person would you want anything less than that? So we can say we are in step with the rest of the world? We need to worry less about what everyone else is doing and protect and do the right thing for our horses. 

    • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

      If they want to be like EUROPE go race in EUROPE!!!…Period…Well Put ITUFF…ty…

    • Tiznowbaby

      We could say a buzzer in the jockey’s whip encourages a horse to try harder, thus running their very best. Should we allow that too?

  • It’s the Ultimate Flip-Flop

    They can call it whatever they want to call it, it is the ultimate flip-flop. What happened to all their sputtering about “it’s ruining the breed” “we have to do what Europe does” “we have to get in step with the rest of the World” “No one will buy our horses” “Our horses will get dehydrated” “it’s bad for their bones” “it conceals other nasty drugs”.

    I guess they just can’t decide if it’s all about the HORSE, or is it all about WINNING.It’s very funny how the phrase “enhances performance” is used. Yes, Lasix allows a horse to breathe properly and to the best of it’s ability, therefore racing at it’s very best. Now why, if you call yourself a genuine horse person would you want anything less than that? So we can say we are in step with the rest of the world? We need to worry less about what everyone else is doing and protect and do the right thing for our horses. 

  • Cancilla45

    Like Barry Irwin and the rest,Phipps and co disingenuous phonies!

    • Black Helen

       I was there the summer lasix was first allowed in New York and one of the Phipps horses needed to be treated.
       No one wanted to explain the need for drugging to Old Man Phipps (Odgen). It was if it were the worst thing in the world, and everyone was scared to break the news to him. As it turned out, it was as bad or worse than they ever suspected.

  • Cancilla45

    Like Barry Irwin and the rest,Phipps and co disingenuous phonies!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Laurierace Laurie McDowell

    Lasix IS a performance enhancer because it allows the horse to breathe without blood in their lungs.  It is not a performance enhancer past the horse’s natural ability.  

    • Bonniemcdo

      Interesting point. What about the  Cornell Collar for flipped palates?  They can use it in Calder I think but no place else. It certainly does help your horse and better his performance. BUT–they allow the surgery.  What about leg wraps–does that affect performance? And what about being the guy who can always get the best jockey –I can tell you a good  jockey can enhance a performance..!!! I think they do need a central commission and then study all of these issues  and come up with some well thought  plans.  Right now it seems it is all over the place and everyone reacts to the latest news story. 

      • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

        I Believe That!!!…ty…

    • kyle

      OK. For sake of argument let’s accept this simplistic view. How then is EIPH different from lactic acid build up? And why shouldn’t we also allow drugs to deter the latter?

      • http://www.facebook.com/david.rose.587 David Rose

        U can use Lactanase to help deter the latter Kyle!

        • kyle

          I knew there were supplements. Is that an injectible? When is that legal to use?

          • Thomalene E.

            well, there is one of the problems with vets and needles in horse racing, Kyle… ideally it is injected into the vein 30 minutes or so before competition, ( which is what everyone does ), but of course…. injections are “illegal” on race day…. so the public thinks the horses dont get treated on race day…. as this and many other substances dont test, ( or get tested for )….. but everyone does it….

    • Olebobbowers

      I agree Laurie. Personally I see it as an enabler, as it does not take a horses level above what it would normally be, but does enable an unhindered performance.

    • Black Helen

       If they bleed so badly, get them off the track and out of the gene pool.
      I’ve seen trainers inject blood up a non bleeders nose so that they could get lasix.
      There is no possible way that 95% of horses need lasix. I would guess maybe less than 5% really need the drug.
      Dope is Dope, Lasix is a drug prohibited in most athletic competitions worldwide.

      A horse cannot ask not to be injected with drugs, but they can certainly plant their feet and refuse to budge if they don’t want to race.
      Big difference, they are the innocents.

      • http://www.facebook.com/david.rose.587 David Rose

        Black Helen…u are simply way off on your percentages darling!

      • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

        With all due respect as I believe you do care dearly about the Horses but that % of bleeders is WAY OFF…ty…

      • Barney Door

        Yes, Helen, you are guessing and you are guessing wrong.

    • saint999

      Lasix does enhance performance past a horse’s natural ability by dehydrating the horse beyond the normal which causes excess weight loss. In a small studiy the excess weight was added as a handicap and there went the increased performance. 

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/GM4MKOH3SRM3GAZLMIKOOOAI74 jttf

    nice going mr phipps and mr janney.  leaders of the industry with intelligence.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Laurierace Laurie McDowell

    Lasix IS a performance enhancer because it allows the horse to breathe without blood in their lungs.  It is not a performance enhancer past the horse’s natural ability.  

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/GM4MKOH3SRM3GAZLMIKOOOAI74 jttf

    nice going mr phipps and mr janney.  leaders of the industry with intelligence.

  • Herewego

    I’m against Federal regulation of horse racing because I think it would do more harm than good but I will make one exception to this position, that being the breed registry.

    Federal regulation of The Jockey Club is very much in order. The Jockey Club not only has a monopoly of the breed registry but also now on the North American Thoroughbred industry records database through their ownership of Equibase.

    Somehow I’m guessing the million dollar or near million dollar per year salaried employees at The Jockey Club wouldn’t last very long under Federal regulation. So bring on the Feds and the racing industry could happily say good bye to Gagliano, Iuliano and many others who have done more harm than good.

  • Herewego

    I’m against Federal regulation of horse racing because I think it would do more harm than good but I will make one exception to this position, that being the breed registry.

    Federal regulation of The Jockey Club is very much in order. The Jockey Club not only has a monopoly of the breed registry but also now on the North American Thoroughbred industry records database through their ownership of Equibase.

    Somehow I’m guessing the million dollar or near million dollar per year salaried employees at The Jockey Club wouldn’t last very long under Federal regulation. So bring on the Feds and the racing industry could happily say good bye to Gagliano, Iuliano and many others who have done more harm than good.

  • Sue M. Chapman

    I did my own study in 2012 Saratoga and Belmont Fall Meetings on the use of Lasix, particularly by the “Group of Forty” (now 60).  Except for Zayat and Magdalena, none of these owners started a 2YO on Lasix.  I constantly posted about Phipps, Janney and Irwin’s hypocracy of running their 3&Up horses on Lasix.  Does something magically happen to horses on January 1?  I posted about the now disregarded Lasix rules regarding when a horse races without it, how long does a horse have to wait to get back on the bleeders’ list.  

    As I wrote in response to Jim Gagliano’s statement, yesterday, if Barry Irwin is correct, and I thank him for scoping his horses both after morning workouts as well as post race, he concluded that it is a very small percentage of two year olds who bleed.  They why use Lasix?
    Because it is performance enhancing.   Nobody backed me up.

  • Sue M. Chapman

    I did my own study in 2012 Saratoga and Belmont Fall Meetings on the use of Lasix, particularly by the “Group of Forty” (now 60).  Except for Zayat and Magdalena, none of these owners started a 2YO on Lasix.  I constantly posted about Phipps, Janney and Irwin’s hypocracy of running their 3&Up horses on Lasix.  Does something magically happen to horses on January 1?  I posted about the now disregarded Lasix rules regarding when a horse races without it, how long does a horse have to wait to get back on the bleeders’ list.  

    As I wrote in response to Jim Gagliano’s statement, yesterday, if Barry Irwin is correct, and I thank him for scoping his horses both after morning workouts as well as post race, he concluded that it is a very small percentage of two year olds who bleed.  They why use Lasix?
    Because it is performance enhancing.   Nobody backed me up.

  • Bonniemcdo

    Interesting post. I still want to know why every cheap claimer runs on lasix with very slow times. Are they all bleeders? Didn’t help them much. Maybe preclude any colt from being a sire that ran on Lasix. Also preclude the sale of a mare that ran on Lasix if she is to be used for breeding purposes.  Start with no Lasix in Grade ones and continue studies at several race tracks to see who bleeds and who does not and how Lasix affects horses. Just some thoughts. A  measured approach going forward would be good. 

  • David

    Comes down to SOP or getting out.  Ethical and competitive individuals want to win and if that were
    taken out of the equation most would elect to quit.  Trainers and the Vets can’t afford enforced integrity even if it
    felt right.  Rub in this case is that the
    hill just got steeper.

  • Bonniemcdo

    Interesting point. What about the  Cornell Collar for flipped palates?  They can use it in Calder I think but no place else. It certainly does help your horse and better his performance. BUT–they allow the surgery.  What about leg wraps–does that affect performance? And what about being the guy who can always get the best jockey –I can tell you a good  jockey can enhance a performance..!!! I think they do need a central commission and then study all of these issues  and come up with some well thought  plans.  Right now it seems it is all over the place and everyone reacts to the latest news story. 

  • kyle

    OK. For sake of argument let’s accept this simplistic view. How then is EIPH different from lactic acid build up? And why shouldn’t we also allow drugs to deter the latter?

  • Gallop

    I will repeat my contention that Ontario is uniquely situated to take the lead on this. A rationale plan to discontinue the lasix program would have long term benefits and would return value to being an Ontario bred. Lean on all the big owners as a place to run them on a more ethical level playing field (as opposed to the less ethical current level playing field.)
     It would create a better secondary market because you could unload your horses to other jurisdictions.
    Differentiate your product… 
    It won’t happen but it would be nice. 

  • Gallop

    I will repeat my contention that Ontario is uniquely situated to take the lead on this. A rationale plan to discontinue the lasix program would have long term benefits and would return value to being an Ontario bred. Lean on all the big owners as a place to run them on a more ethical level playing field (as opposed to the less ethical current level playing field.)
     It would create a better secondary market because you could unload your horses to other jurisdictions.
    Differentiate your product… 
    It won’t happen but it would be nice. 

  • Drcate4

    Lasix is a prophylactic medication.  It is a preventive.  It doesn’t enhance.  It prevents pulmonary edema.  Lasix will never cause a horse to run faster/better/stronger/further than it would run if pulmonary bleeding didn’t occur. The horse will simply run to the best of its non-bleeding ability. When used in humans, it pulls fluid out of the tissues and helps prevent pulmnary edema, allowing the human to perform as (s)he normally would, not better.  If the human is unable to lift 100 pounds, the addition of Lasix will not give that ability.

    • Forego

       How about a prophylactic for joint pains? arthritis? or how about a prophylactic for lactic acid so the horse does not tire at 9 furlongs? maybe even one for muscle pain so that there will be no pain?

      Ridiculous

    • SteveG

      First of all, pulmonary edema is not EIPH…that’s where I stopped reading.

      • Roisin

        Thank you !!

      • Drcate4

        Sorry–I just reread my post and I wasn’t clear.  The pulmonary edema was in reference to human beings.  Lasix is beneficial in treating congestive heart failure (CHF) in humans, which will prevent pulmonary edema in humans.  While it is true that humans can experience exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage, Lasix is primarily used in CHF, and we have study after study on its value there.  EIPH presents with symptoms similar to pulmonary edema, although in humans, there is a very pronounced wheeze and bubbling to respirations, accompanied by pink, frothy sputum.  Is that also seen in horses? 

        • Forego

           We do not give lasix to humans to compete at the highest level in sports. Also, the human can say NO!!

        • Milezinni

          So you really believe a horse runs just as fast under 126 lbs, as it can under 112? Really?

        • SteveG

          There’s no instructive correlation between lasix use for pulmonary edema (in ill humans) due to congestive heart failure & lasix use for EIPH in otherwise healthy racehorses.

          How any of that has to do with whether or not lasix is a PED (which you seem to believe whole-heartedly) is anyone’s guess.

    • kyle

      Here you go. I assume this a real vet. This is a fine example of the specious reasoning and the mechanistic mind set the equine medical community uses to prop up this failed paradigm. Most interesting is the “treatment creep.” When exactly did lasix become “preventative?” And am I mistaken, but do the rules and guidleines – as lax as they are and as much as lasix use has become rubber-stamped – still not require some “evidence” of EIPH? And hence, is “prevention” recognized as a legitimate use?

      • kyle

        And let’s be clear what this advocates: Every Horse, Every Workout, Every Race.

      • Thomalene E.

        Yes, Kyle… rules.. lol… in most states, all a trainer has to do to get a horse certified for lasix is submit a form  stating that the horse bled and was examined endoscopically by the TRAINERS VET…. I personally have requested hundreds of these signatures from my vet, at my desk, and in most cases, the horse  was never scoped… or scoped clean… one time, in WV, I was told, in order to get a horse certified to use lasix, the state vet actually came to my barn and scoped my horse…. 5 minutes prior to her arrival we merely drew 100cc of blood from her vein and injected it into her trachea…. standard procedure….

    • Sean Kerr

       Pure baloney: if a horse is bleeding then it has actually attempted to go past what its body is telling you it can do. Giving salix pushes the horse to go further – so it helps mask the unsoundness i.e., the horse has clearly has an issue. What you fail to see is that salix is a diuretic which depletes the electrolytes, potassium, calcium and other vital minerals BEFORE the race. Any comparison to human use is absolutely ridiculous: no human (except maybe the jockeys who are keeping their weight down) is dumb enough to take such a drug before competing. So given that the horse has hit a performance wall, i.e., bleeding, the drug does in fact ‘enhance’ the performance.

    • Roisin

      Pulmonary edema and EIPH are COMPLETELY different in etiology.

      Please do some research !!!

  • Drcate4

    Lasix is a prophylactic medication.  It is a preventive.  It doesn’t enhance.  It prevents pulmonary edema.  Lasix will never cause a horse to run faster/better/stronger/further than it would run if pulmonary bleeding didn’t occur. The horse will simply run to the best of its non-bleeding ability. When used in humans, it pulls fluid out of the tissues and helps prevent pulmnary edema, allowing the human to perform as (s)he normally would, not better.  If the human is unable to lift 100 pounds, the addition of Lasix will not give that ability.

  • Spiritbridle

    Dang it all.   LISTEN folks.
    Bleeding in caused by lack of air pressure in the lungs. 
    Two causes are lack of developement of the working lung in juveniles and how the throat latch is compressed due to the head/neck frame of the ridden horse.
    Horses when running need to have a ram jet airway system, that is why wild horses run with their noses out and their heads low.

  • Spiritbridle

    Dang it all.   LISTEN folks.
    Bleeding in caused by lack of air pressure in the lungs. 
    Two causes are lack of developement of the working lung in juveniles and how the throat latch is compressed due to the head/neck frame of the ridden horse.
    Horses when running need to have a ram jet airway system, that is why wild horses run with their noses out and their heads low.

  • Beachy

    I think the deal is that they want to be able to race horses that should not be racing.  In essence, this creates increased income and business opportunity.  Secretariat raced and breathed just fine without Lasix, but horses like him are a rarity. 

    Just like any other addiction, the trick here would have been never to start.  And now you’ve got yourselves a real humdinger, with the whole world watching, too. 

    I love racing, preferably when it’s done right, or as “right” as possible.  But I am tired of reading articles that attempt to “foster the general public’s love of the horse”.  I don’t think the general public has any trouble loving horses.  But the general public does not like to see horses unduly drugged, raced, exploited, or abused.  And until all of you get a handle on that, racetracks and the like will not thrive. 

    I don’t know, especially with the advent of things like television and the internet, that you will ever see racing attendance similar to that of pre-1950′s.  But it could be better–yet not until there is a grip on some of the above.  I’m not too happy with a lot of the trainers, but I am way LESS happy with the vets, especially since I am a health care professional(albeit for humans).  Ladies and gentlemen, the standard is “first do no harm”, NOT “first line your pocket”.  Some of you should be heartily ashamed of yourselves, especially with innocent animals in the picture that have no concept of self-determination or informed consent.  What you are doing is not much better than harming children.  Get with the program, or your industry could die. 

  • Beachy

    I think the deal is that they want to be able to race horses that should not be racing.  In essence, this creates increased income and business opportunity.  Secretariat raced and breathed just fine without Lasix, but horses like him are a rarity. 

    Just like any other addiction, the trick here would have been never to start.  And now you’ve got yourselves a real humdinger, with the whole world watching, too. 

    I love racing, preferably when it’s done right, or as “right” as possible.  But I am tired of reading articles that attempt to “foster the general public’s love of the horse”.  I don’t think the general public has any trouble loving horses.  But the general public does not like to see horses unduly drugged, raced, exploited, or abused.  And until all of you get a handle on that, racetracks and the like will not thrive. 

    I don’t know, especially with the advent of things like television and the internet, that you will ever see racing attendance similar to that of pre-1950′s.  But it could be better–yet not until there is a grip on some of the above.  I’m not too happy with a lot of the trainers, but I am way LESS happy with the vets, especially since I am a health care professional(albeit for humans).  Ladies and gentlemen, the standard is “first do no harm”, NOT “first line your pocket”.  Some of you should be heartily ashamed of yourselves, especially with innocent animals in the picture that have no concept of self-determination or informed consent.  What you are doing is not much better than harming children.  Get with the program, or your industry could die. 

  • Forego

     How about a prophylactic for joint pains? arthritis? or how about a prophylactic for lactic acid so the horse does not tire at 9 furlongs? maybe even one for muscle pain so that there will be no pain?

    Ridiculous

  • Olebobbowers

    I agree Laurie. Personally I see it as an enabler, as it does not take a horses level above what it would normally be, but does enable an unhindered performance.

  • SteveG

    First of all, pulmonary edema is not EIPH…that’s where I stopped reading.

  • Satish

    Ray,

    The reason they ran their 2 year olds without Lasix is very simple – they wanted to be able to compete in the Breeders Cup; period. Unless and until we implement a policy to gradually withdraw Lasix which eventually leads to a total ban, this hypocracy will continue.

    This is a very expensive and highly competitive sport and results matter. Otherwise there is no way to get a return on your investment.

    Satish

    • Bonniemcdo

      Totally agree with you. 

    • Charlie Davis

      What hypocrisy?  They didn’t run their 2 year olds on Lasix, and ran their 3 year olds and up on Lasix.  They did exactly what they said they’d do.

  • Satish

    Ray,

    The reason they ran their 2 year olds without Lasix is very simple – they wanted to be able to compete in the Breeders Cup; period. Unless and until we implement a policy to gradually withdraw Lasix which eventually leads to a total ban, this hypocracy will continue.

    This is a very expensive and highly competitive sport and results matter. Otherwise there is no way to get a return on your investment.

    Satish

  • kyle

    Here you go. I assume this a real vet. This is a fine example of the specious reasoning and the mechanistic mind set the equine medical community uses to prop up this failed paradigm. Most interesting is the “treatment creep.” When exactly did lasix become “preventative?” And am I mistaken, but do the rules and guidleines – as lax as they are and as much as lasix use has become rubber-stamped – still not require some “evidence” of EIPH? And hence, is “prevention” recognized as a legitimate use?

  • Mark

    Both are renowned equine scientists I assume?

  • Mark

    Both are renowned equine scientists I assume?

  • Lou Baranello, Former Steward

    The lasix issue is going to to be resolved.  I don’t know in whose favor, but I fear the horses will not be the beneficiaries of the result.  I expect the resulting decision will be made for all the wrong reasons.  We hear and read many comments on both sides of the argument, many of which are simply smoke to cover the true agenda of the speaker or writer.  Clout within the industry will decide the eventual result.  Yesterday I would have described both Mr. Phipps and Mr. Janney as gentlemen with clout within the industry who can be depended upon to put the horses first in this issue or any other they might be asked to pass judgement upon.  Today, I need to rethink that.     

  • Lou Baranello, Former Steward

    The lasix issue is going to to be resolved.  I don’t know in whose favor, but I fear the horses will not be the beneficiaries of the result.  I expect the resulting decision will be made for all the wrong reasons.  We hear and read many comments on both sides of the argument, many of which are simply smoke to cover the true agenda of the speaker or writer.  Clout within the industry will decide the eventual result.  Yesterday I would have described both Mr. Phipps and Mr. Janney as gentlemen with clout within the industry who can be depended upon to put the horses first in this issue or any other they might be asked to pass judgement upon.  Today, I need to rethink that.     

  • Roisin

    Thank you !!

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    Losing up to 30pds is the difference or more than a second at 5 furlong. The difference between an claimer, or an first allowance horse

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    Losing up to 30pds is the difference or more than a second at 5 furlong. The difference between an claimer, or an first allowance horse

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    The best would be an split competion, one raceday med.s free and one racedaymed,s allowed.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    The best would be an split competion, one raceday med.s free and one racedaymed,s allowed.

  • Drcate4

    Sorry–I just reread my post and I wasn’t clear.  The pulmonary edema was in reference to human beings.  Lasix is beneficial in treating congestive heart failure (CHF) in humans, which will prevent pulmonary edema in humans.  While it is true that humans can experience exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage, Lasix is primarily used in CHF, and we have study after study on its value there.  EIPH presents with symptoms similar to pulmonary edema, although in humans, there is a very pronounced wheeze and bubbling to respirations, accompanied by pink, frothy sputum.  Is that also seen in horses? 

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    HOO DOO U BELIEVE???…ty…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    HOO DOO U BELIEVE???…ty…

  • Forego

     We do not give lasix to humans to compete at the highest level in sports. Also, the human can say NO!!

  • Black Helen

     If they bleed so badly, get them off the track and out of the gene pool.
    I’ve seen trainers inject blood up a non bleeders nose so that they could get lasix.
    There is no possible way that 95% of horses need lasix. I would guess maybe less than 5% really need the drug.
    Dope is Dope, Lasix is a drug prohibited in most athletic competitions worldwide.

    A horse cannot ask not to be injected with drugs, but they can certainly plant their feet and refuse to budge if they don’t want to race.
    Big difference, they are the innocents.

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    I Believe That!!!…ty…

  • Black Helen

     I was there the summer lasix was first allowed in New York and one of the Phipps horses needed to be treated.
     No one wanted to explain the need for drugging to Old Man Phipps (Odgen). It was if it were the worst thing in the world, and everyone was scared to break the news to him. As it turned out, it was as bad or worse than they ever suspected.

  • Bonniemcdo

    Totally agree with you. 

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    If they want to be like EUROPE go race in EUROPE!!!…Period…Well Put ITUFF…ty…

  • kyle

    And let’s be clear what this advocates: Every Horse, Every Workout, Every Race.

  • Stanley inman

    The impact of this new rule
    Its consequence,
    will not be symmetric,
    Thus,
    owners uninterested in their horse’s salvage value
    (A high percentage of borses in training)
    Will have freedom to use raceday meds;
    No sudden drop in “horsemen’s standard of living”
    (We throw you a bone)
    Over time the entire breed becomes cleansed,
    Ready now to rejoin our peers as
    “world class” horsemen

  • Stanley inman

    “salvage value as breeding stock”

  • Milezinni

    So you really believe a horse runs just as fast under 126 lbs, as it can under 112? Really?

  • Charlie Davis

    What hypocrisy?  They didn’t run their 2 year olds on Lasix, and ran their 3 year olds and up on Lasix.  They did exactly what they said they’d do.

  • Milezinni

    So sorry, It’s about the weight!! It’s all about the weight!!

    Take two horses of relatively equal ability, one carries 125 lbs, the other 109 lbs. Still think they’re equal?

    Take two horses of relatively equal ability, one given Salix, the other, no Salix. You would be spotting the horse 20, 30 lbs or more!!

    If all horses are on Salix, isnt that a level playing field?

    Nope, not at all….Salix is NOT a generic dose. Plus, Horses have varying metabolisms, on top of private vets giving various dosages based on desired weight loss!! Not to mention weather.

    Why are you all so quick to believe that Jockeys are heaving meals, denying themselves food at all, and sweating in the box between races, just to get weight off, and you don’t for one second believe that the trainers are doing the same thing with the horses!?!

    It’s all about Furosemides diuretic effect. Always was….

    The rest of this argument is a snow job!!  That’s why these “horsemen” sound like they are constantly contradicting themselves. Just ignore the little man behind the curtain…….

  • Milezinni

    So sorry, It’s about the weight!! It’s all about the weight!!

    Take two horses of relatively equal ability, one carries 125 lbs, the other 109 lbs. Still think they’re equal?

    Take two horses of relatively equal ability, one given Salix, the other, no Salix. You would be spotting the horse 20, 30 lbs or more!!

    If all horses are on Salix, isnt that a level playing field?

    Nope, not at all….Salix is NOT a generic dose. Plus, Horses have varying metabolisms, on top of private vets giving various dosages based on desired weight loss!! Not to mention weather.

    Why are you all so quick to believe that Jockeys are heaving meals, denying themselves food at all, and sweating in the box between races, just to get weight off, and you don’t for one second believe that the trainers are doing the same thing with the horses!?!

    It’s all about Furosemides diuretic effect. Always was….

    The rest of this argument is a snow job!!  That’s why these “horsemen” sound like they are constantly contradicting themselves. Just ignore the little man behind the curtain…….

  • SteveG

    There’s no instructive correlation between lasix use for pulmonary edema (in ill humans) due to congestive heart failure & lasix use for EIPH in otherwise healthy racehorses.

    How any of that has to do with whether or not lasix is a PED (which you seem to believe whole-heartedly) is anyone’s guess.

  • Tinky

    It is amazing that the topic of whether or not Lasix is performance enhancing continues to be so polarizing. There is NO question that it enhances performance, and anyone who argues otherwise is simply ignorant of the facts.

    For the umpteenth time:

    Lasix is classified as “performance enhancing” by every major sporting body in the world (e.g. the Olympics, NCAA, NFL, MLB, etc., etc., etc.).

    The Mayo Clinic classifies Lasix as “performance enhancing”.

    Trainers in the U.S., virtually without exception, have for decades been using Lasix on non-bleeders PRECISELY because they believe it to be performance enhancing.

    Simple physics explains why – just like in auto racing – a lighter chassis confers performance advantages.

    These are FACTS, folks. For those of you who require more convincing, here are two scientific papers on the subject, both of which conclude the obvious:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10476714

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17402434

    The conclusion of the second study was: “Improvement of performance in the furosemide trials was due more to the weight-loss related effects of the drug than its apparent alleviation of EIPH.”

    And while it is not a necessary point to make, I’ll add another example of how Lasix enhances performance. It is a nuance that I have never heard anyone else address. 

    As Lasix lowers blood pressure, every horseman knows that its use is advantageous on any highly-strung horse. Such runners are much more likely to get to the post in relatively relaxed fashion, which in turn allows them to conserve important (if not crucial) energy. What that means, in practical terms, is that even in the case of non-bleeders, without the use of the drug, many would fail to perform as well.

    • Black Helen

       Tink, you are usually slamming someone, this time you are lucid, coherent and lay out the facts, which many here CHOOSE to ignore.
      Thank you

  • Tinky

    It is amazing that the topic of whether or not Lasix is performance enhancing continues to be so polarizing. There is NO question that it enhances performance, and anyone who argues otherwise is simply ignorant of the facts.

    For the umpteenth time:

    Lasix is classified as “performance enhancing” by every major sporting body in the world (e.g. the Olympics, NCAA, NFL, MLB, etc., etc., etc.).

    The Mayo Clinic classifies Lasix as “performance enhancing”.

    Trainers in the U.S., virtually without exception, have for decades been using Lasix on non-bleeders PRECISELY because they believe it to be performance enhancing.

    Simple physics explains why – just like in auto racing – a lighter chassis confers performance advantages.

    These are FACTS, folks. For those of you who require more convincing, here are two scientific papers on the subject, both of which conclude the obvious:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pu

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pu

    The conclusion of the second study was: “Improvement of performance in the furosemide trials was due more to the weight-loss related effects of the drug than its apparent alleviation of EIPH.”

    And while it is not a necessary point to make, I’ll add another example of how Lasix enhances performance. It is a nuance that I have never heard anyone else address. 

    As Lasix lowers blood pressure, every horseman knows that its use is advantageous on any highly-strung horse. Such runners are much more likely to get to the post in relatively relaxed fashion, which in turn allows them to conserve important (if not crucial) energy. What that means, in practical terms, is that even in the case of non-bleeders, without the use of the drug, many would fail to perform as well.

  • Black Helen

     Tink, you are usually slamming someone, this time you are lucid, coherent and lay out the facts, which many here CHOOSE to ignore.
    Thank you

  • Milezinni

    Just finished reading the new proposed medication reform (endorsed by the RCI)  for Massachusetts. And this is confusing….there will be an “Official Furosemide List”, and a completely seperate “Official Bleeders List”. Here is the criteria for a horse to be placed on the Official Furosemide List ( and the list transfers from state-to-state) ….

    “(a) After the horse’s licensed trainer and licensed veterinarian determine that it would be in the horse’s best interests to race with furosemide the official veterinarian or his/her designee shall be notified using the prescribed form, that the horse is to be put on the Furosemide List.”No criteria other than Trainer / Vet decision…nope, no scope, no evidence of bleeding whatsoever. Just Trainer and Vet think it’s in the horses best interest……considering the diurectic effects, of course it’s in the horses “best interest”. Wouldn’t want to give up 10-20 lbs to the competition, would you?…..I told you all along, Furosemide in Horse Racing has nothing to do with bleeding, it’s about the weight loss…….. 

  • Milezinni

    Just finished reading the new proposed medication reform (endorsed by the RCI)  for Massachusetts. And this is confusing….there will be an “Official Furosemide List”, and a completely seperate “Official Bleeders List”. Here is the criteria for a horse to be placed on the Official Furosemide List ( and the list transfers from state-to-state) ….

    “(a) After the horse’s licensed trainer and licensed veterinarian determine that it would be in the horse’s best interests to race with furosemide the official veterinarian or his/her designee shall be notified using the prescribed form, that the horse is to be put on the Furosemide List.”No criteria other than Trainer / Vet decision…nope, no scope, no evidence of bleeding whatsoever. Just Trainer and Vet think it’s in the horses best interest……considering the diurectic effects, of course it’s in the horses “best interest”. Wouldn’t want to give up 10-20 lbs to the competition, would you?…..I told you all along, Furosemide in Horse Racing has nothing to do with bleeding, it’s about the weight loss…….. 

  • Sean Kerr

     Pure baloney: if a horse is bleeding then it has actually attempted to go past what its body is telling you it can do. Giving salix pushes the horse to go further – so it helps mask the unsoundness i.e., the horse has clearly has an issue. What you fail to see is that salix is a diuretic which depletes the electrolytes, potassium, calcium and other vital minerals BEFORE the race. Any comparison to human use is absolutely ridiculous: no human (except maybe the jockeys who are keeping their weight down) is dumb enough to take such a drug before competing. So given that the horse has hit a performance wall, i.e., bleeding, the drug does in fact ‘enhance’ the performance.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    When the stuff would not act as an diuretic,things might be easier. But for now, the only ageement would be an split competion, races designed for lasix and non lasix racers

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    When the stuff would not act as an diuretic,things might be easier. But for now, the only ageement would be an split competion, races designed for lasix and non lasix racers

  • http://www.facebook.com/david.rose.587 David Rose

    U can use Lactanase to help deter the latter Kyle!

  • http://www.facebook.com/david.rose.587 David Rose

    Black Helen…u are simply way off on your percentages darling!

  • bob hope

    lasix has always been known to be a performance enhancer. thus the L1 L2 on the daily programs.  it has become a handicapping tool by knowledgeable handicappers.  first time lasix administration creates a change in post time odds as a rule.  if it isn’t in the minds of racecourse operators, we challenge to remove the information from their daily programs.

  • bob hope

    lasix has always been known to be a performance enhancer. thus the L1 L2 on the daily programs.  it has become a handicapping tool by knowledgeable handicappers.  first time lasix administration creates a change in post time odds as a rule.  if it isn’t in the minds of racecourse operators, we challenge to remove the information from their daily programs.

  • kyle

    I knew there were supplements. Is that an injectible? When is that legal to use?

  • Big Red

    It all comes down to the money.
    The formula for this debate is simple: (No lasix=Bleeders)-(Owners)
    Without the end result, how can racing survive ?
    (if the rich guys are starting to complain then how can the little guy get by?)

  • Big Red

    It all comes down to the money.
    The formula for this debate is simple: (No lasix=Bleeders)-(Owners)
    Without the end result, how can racing survive ?
    (if the rich guys are starting to complain then how can the little guy get by?)

  • Beachy

    It seems to me that the use of Lasix enables one to possibly race horses that should not be racing.  It’s the quantity/quality thing, whether you’re talking about money or horseflesh; in this case, both. 

    I can understand not wanting to lose money in any aspect of business, but what is bizarre is some of the guys commenting on this have made megabucks doing something else(or inheriting), not racing.  And because a lot of people in this picture are truly not worried about the origin of their next hamburger, then I really think they should, instead, do the right and fair thing by their horses. 

    No drugs in ANY racing horse is certainly a level playing field, just like in Europe.  

  • Beachy

    It seems to me that the use of Lasix enables one to possibly race horses that should not be racing.  It’s the quantity/quality thing, whether you’re talking about money or horseflesh; in this case, both. 

    I can understand not wanting to lose money in any aspect of business, but what is bizarre is some of the guys commenting on this have made megabucks doing something else(or inheriting), not racing.  And because a lot of people in this picture are truly not worried about the origin of their next hamburger, then I really think they should, instead, do the right and fair thing by their horses. 

    No drugs in ANY racing horse is certainly a level playing field, just like in Europe.  

  • Roisin

    Pulmonary edema and EIPH are COMPLETELY different in etiology.

    Please do some research !!!

  • TJ

    You are right on with the Lance Armstrong analogy.  End of story.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    No more than 5% of the breed is really affected, but 95% are spending big amounts of money to stay competive.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    No more than 5% of the breed is really affected, but 95% are spending big amounts of money to stay competive.

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    With all due respect as I believe you do care dearly about the Horses but that % of bleeders is WAY OFF…ty…

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    Severe bleeding is an inheritanced weakness. So why on earth trying to mask this inheritance. Weeding this out would be sufficient

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.vandenbrink.52 Ben van den Brink

    Severe bleeding is an inheritanced weakness. So why on earth trying to mask this inheritance. Weeding this out would be sufficient

  • Steve M

    Salix does not appear to enhance performance because race times have remained relatively unchanged for decades. Instead the medication is better defined as a performance normalizer. It allows the horse to humanely achieve its potential.

    The main reason why horses bleed is because that’s a man made condition in many cases. Horses aren’t meant to run the way man wants them to.

    Jeff Gural of The Meadowlands is taking action. Spending his own money by hiring professional investigators to catch cheaters.  He is a man of action not words. 

    If the Jockey Club (as example) spent money in this regard perhaps it would send a message. The hay, oats and water trainer who uses a a legal anti-bledding medication is not corrupting the sport. 

    • Tinky

      “Salix does not appear to enhance performance because race times have remained relatively unchanged for decades.”

      Powerful analysis there, Steve. Next time, you might want to actually look into what Lasix does, and why it is classified as “performance enhancing” by every major sporting body in the world.

      • Steve M

        Please see recent “Steve M” post in response to your comments. Thank you.

      • Steve M

        You did not answer the  question – only attacked it. If furosemide is performance enhancing why haven’t race times improved? In baseball steriod use translated to increased homeruns. In football HGH  increases strength. This cases could be considered performance enhancing.
         
        75% of racing Thoroughbreds bleed. Horses which bleed eventually experience fibrosis in the lungs due to residual blood. This is detailed by a renowed EIPH research veterinarian at Michigan State University. Veterinarians attending the Medication Summitt meeting at Belmont Park (were you there?) said that horses which bleed look and become scared from the suffocating effects. So man causes the horse to bleed by racing them and housing horses in unnatural envronmental conditions yet some want to withould a medication that supports horse health?  The American Association of Equine Practitioner’s supports furosemide use for the health and well being of the horse. These are the educated professionals which have scientific education and practical experience. An argument is that veterinarians make so much money off furosemide that they are only protecting their livelihoods. Most vets  say that pre-race fursomenide accounts for less revenue than their time is worth. Go to Gulfstream (for example) and ask a few. Now in some jurisdictions State vets administer fursosemide. In discussion with equine veterinarians which are board certified in internal medicine (DACVIM) they say furosemide is better labeled as a “performance normalizing” medication. Horse don’t go faster…they just go safer. As for previous claims that furosemide hurts our stallion valuations internationally…that argument lost steam when Animal Kingdom was sold to Australia.   Is furosemide a panacea? No. Yet the real issue is what’s in the welfare of the race horse. The majority of medical experts in the industry beleive furosemide supports horse welfare.
        Thoroughbred racing has alot to offer. If we do right by the horse we’ll never go wrong. The main issue in horse racing is illegal drugs. The Standardbred industry is making a big step by hiring private investigator(s) to catch chemists. This story is outlines on the USTA website. Thoroughbred racing too needs to take action that is below the surface.

    • SteveG

      I suppose we should dispense with all urinalysis & blood testing, then, for PEDs other than lasix since “race times have remained relatively unchanged for decades.”  Must be a squeaky clean environment…

      Because if you’re going to hold up static race times as an argument that lasix is not a performance enhancer, then the known (and unknown) performance enhancers aren’t doing their jobs, either.

      In think the race time argument is fallacious, I’m afraid.

      • Steve M

        It’s not that the argument (rather “statement”) is fallacious but rather multi-faceted. “Drugs” in racing are related to deadening pain, creating excitation, or suppressing performance, as examples. Therefore these are both performance enhancing and suppressing. So testing is important for the health and welfare of the horse (and jockey). Not to mention the betting public. 

        As for race times perhaps the horse has achieved its mechanical limitation. That said – helping horses (with a legal Medication) from the effects of EIPH is proactive and humane. At least in the environment that exists today where horses are kept in stalls in high stress man made situations.

        • SteveG

          Perhaps I misunderstood & correct me if I’m wong.  I thought you said that static race times were proof that lasix was not a PED.

          My response was based on that statement which I found unsuppportable.

  • Steve M

    Salix does not appear to enhance performance because race times have remained relatively unchanged for decades. Instead the medication is better defined as a performance normalizer. It allows the horse to humanely achieve its potential.

    The main reason why horses bleed is because that’s a man made condition in many cases. Horses aren’t meant to run the way man wants them to.

    Jeff Gural of The Meadowlands is taking action. Spending his own money by hiring professional investigators to catch cheaters.  He is a man of action not words. 

    If the Jockey Club (as example) spent money in this regard perhaps it would send a message. The hay, oats and water trainer who uses a a legal anti-bledding medication is not corrupting the sport. 

  • http://twitter.com/camehome1517 Cathy Riccio

    Inside Information

  • http://twitter.com/camehome1517 Cathy Riccio

    Inside Information

  • Thomalene E.

    well, there is one of the problems with vets and needles in horse racing, Kyle… ideally it is injected into the vein 30 minutes or so before competition, ( which is what everyone does ), but of course…. injections are “illegal” on race day…. so the public thinks the horses dont get treated on race day…. as this and many other substances dont test, ( or get tested for )….. but everyone does it….

  • Thomalene E.

    Yes, Kyle… rules.. lol… in most states, all a trainer has to do to get a horse certified for lasix is submit a form  stating that the horse bled and was examined endoscopically by the TRAINERS VET…. I personally have requested hundreds of these signatures from my vet, at my desk, and in most cases, the horse  was never scoped… or scoped clean… one time, in WV, I was told, in order to get a horse certified to use lasix, the state vet actually came to my barn and scoped my horse…. 5 minutes prior to her arrival we merely drew 100cc of blood from her vein and injected it into her trachea…. standard procedure….

  • Tinky

    “Salix does not appear to enhance performance because race times have remained relatively unchanged for decades.”

    Powerful analysis there, Steve. Next time, you might want to actually look into what Lasix does, and why it is classified as “performance enhancing” by every major sporting body in the world.

  • Steve M

     
    You did not answer the  question – only attacked it. If furosemide is performance enhancing why haven’t race times improved? In baseball steriod use translated to increased homeruns. In football HGH  increases strength. This cases could be considered performance enhancing.
     
    75% of racing Thoroughbreds bleed. Horses which bleed eventually experience fibrosis in the lungs due to residual blood. This is detailed by a renowed EIPH research veterinarian at Michigan State University. Veterinarians attending the Medication Summitt meeting at Belmont Park (were you there?) said that horses which bleed look and become scared from the suffocating effects.

    So man causes the horse to bleed by racing them and housing horses in unnatural envronmental conditions yet some want to withould a medication that supports horse health?
     
    The American Association of Equine Practitioner’s supports furosemide use for the health and well being of the horse. These are the educated professionals which have scientific education and practical experience.
     
    An argument is that veterinarians make so much money off furosemide that they are only protecting their livelihoods. Most vets  say that pre-race fursomenide accounts for less revenue than their time is worth. Go to Gulfstream (for example) and ask a few. Now in some jurisdictions State vets administer fursosemide.
     
    In discussion with equine veterinarians which are board certified in internal medicine (DACVIM) they say furosemide is better labeled as a “performance normalizing” medication. Horse don’t go faster…they just go safer.
     
    As for previous claims that furosemide hurts our stallion valuations internationally…that argument lost steam when Animal Kingdom was sold to Australia.  
     
    Is furosemide a panacea? No. Yet the real issue is what’s in the welfare of the race horse. The majority of medical experts in the industry beleive furosemide supports horse welfare.

    Thoroughbred racing has alot to offer. If we do right by the horse we’ll never go wrong. The main issue in horse racing is illegal drugs. The Standardbred industry is making a big step by hiring private investigator(s) to catch chemists. This story is outlines on the USTA website. Thoroughbred racing too needs to take action that is below the surface. 

     
       
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    • Steve M

      above addressed to Tinky.

    • Tinky

      Steve,

      I addressed the topic thoroughly just a few posts below. Any endurance athlete able to quickly and efficiently shed a meaningful amount of weight is, by definition, benefitting from a performance advantage.

      This is simple physics, and there is no way around it. I’ve also explained below how racehorses benefit in yet another, more nuanced manner (as a result of lowered blood pressure).

      I have also cited and linked to scientific studies which conclude both that Lasix does, in fact, improve performance, and that it is not due primarily to the reduction of EIPH.

      Juxtapose those FACTS with your argument, which consists of the utterly unscientific, vague, and one-legged claim that times haven’t improved.

      Please.

      • Steve M

        You might argue that oats are performance enhancing because they provide energy not gained eating grass/hay. Are oats performance enhancing? 

        If a horse isn’t getting faster or stronger than what’s the performance enhancement advantage of furosemide?  FACT: Race times are a benchmark. They haven’t improved. 

        Read the NTRA presentations (again?) that were made by leading veterinarians on the topic of EIPH. FACT: 75% of T-bred racehorses bleed and furosemide safely helps them.

        Perhaps your issue is with the recognized professionals who contradict your position? There’s also the South African Study demonstrating furosemide helps horse health. This was authored by a Dean of a veterinary college. You might try him. 

        To ask a horse to perform an unnatural athletic feat and then deprive them of a legal/safe medication proven to address that condition is inhumane.

        Spend some time arguing about catching the cheaters or protecting the horses that are whipped too much. 

        • Tinky

          Really, Steve, you’re being ridiculous.

          I have stated facts that show why Lasix is considered to be performance enhancing by every sporting body in the world, and explained the simple mechanism(s) by which this occurs.

          There are easily accessible scientific studies done of Thoroughbreds that have demonstrated these facts in action.

          And your response is to argue that the times for Thoroughbreds haven’t gotten faster? That is simply not a serious argument.

          Please do name some of the “recognized professionals” who contradict the position of the Mayo Clinic, every major sporting body in the world, and the scientists (to use just one example) who have concluded that “Improvement of performance in the furosemide trials was due more to the weight-loss related effects of the drug than its apparent alleviation of EIPH.” (link to study in my post below)

          Finally, catching cheaters is extremely important, but unrelated to the question of Lasix use.

  • Steve M

     
    You did not answer the  question – only attacked it. If furosemide is performance enhancing why haven’t race times improved? In baseball steriod use translated to increased homeruns. In football HGH  increases strength. This cases could be considered performance enhancing.
     
    75% of racing Thoroughbreds bleed. Horses which bleed eventually experience fibrosis in the lungs due to residual blood. This is detailed by a renowed EIPH research veterinarian at Michigan State University. Veterinarians attending the Medication Summitt meeting at Belmont Park (were you there?) said that horses which bleed look and become scared from the suffocating effects.

    So man causes the horse to bleed by racing them and housing horses in unnatural envronmental conditions yet some want to withould a medication that supports horse health?
     
    The American Association of Equine Practitioner’s supports furosemide use for the health and well being of the horse. These are the educated professionals which have scientific education and practical experience.
     
    An argument is that veterinarians make so much money off furosemide that they are only protecting their livelihoods. Most vets  say that pre-race fursomenide accounts for less revenue than their time is worth. Go to Gulfstream (for example) and ask a few. Now in some jurisdictions State vets administer fursosemide.
     
    In discussion with equine veterinarians which are board certified in internal medicine (DACVIM) they say furosemide is better labeled as a “performance normalizing” medication. Horse don’t go faster…they just go safer.
     
    As for previous claims that furosemide hurts our stallion valuations internationally…that argument lost steam when Animal Kingdom was sold to Australia.  
     
    Is furosemide a panacea? No. Yet the real issue is what’s in the welfare of the race horse. The majority of medical experts in the industry beleive furosemide supports horse welfare.

    Thoroughbred racing has alot to offer. If we do right by the horse we’ll never go wrong. The main issue in horse racing is illegal drugs. The Standardbred industry is making a big step by hiring private investigator(s) to catch chemists. This story is outlines on the USTA website. Thoroughbred racing too needs to take action that is below the surface. 

     
       
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

  • Steve M

    above addressed to Tinky.

  • Steve M

    Please see recent “Steve M” post in response to your comments. Thank you.

  • Steve M

    You did not answer the  question – only attacked it. If furosemide is performance enhancing why haven’t race times improved? In baseball steriod use translated to increased homeruns. In football HGH  increases strength. This cases could be considered performance enhancing.
     
    75% of racing Thoroughbreds bleed. Horses which bleed eventually experience fibrosis in the lungs due to residual blood. This is detailed by a renowed EIPH research veterinarian at Michigan State University. Veterinarians attending the Medication Summitt meeting at Belmont Park (were you there?) said that horses which bleed look and become scared from the suffocating effects. So man causes the horse to bleed by racing them and housing horses in unnatural envronmental conditions yet some want to withould a medication that supports horse health?  The American Association of Equine Practitioner’s supports furosemide use for the health and well being of the horse. These are the educated professionals which have scientific education and practical experience. An argument is that veterinarians make so much money off furosemide that they are only protecting their livelihoods. Most vets  say that pre-race fursomenide accounts for less revenue than their time is worth. Go to Gulfstream (for example) and ask a few. Now in some jurisdictions State vets administer fursosemide. In discussion with equine veterinarians which are board certified in internal medicine (DACVIM) they say furosemide is better labeled as a “performance normalizing” medication. Horse don’t go faster…they just go safer. As for previous claims that furosemide hurts our stallion valuations internationally…that argument lost steam when Animal Kingdom was sold to Australia.   Is furosemide a panacea? No. Yet the real issue is what’s in the welfare of the race horse. The majority of medical experts in the industry beleive furosemide supports horse welfare.
    Thoroughbred racing has alot to offer. If we do right by the horse we’ll never go wrong. The main issue in horse racing is illegal drugs. The Standardbred industry is making a big step by hiring private investigator(s) to catch chemists. This story is outlines on the USTA website. Thoroughbred racing too needs to take action that is below the surface.

  • Tinky

    Steve,

    I addressed the topic thoroughly just a few posts below. Any endurance athlete able to quickly and efficiently shed a meaningful amount of weight is, by definition, benefitting from a performance advantage.

    This is simple physics, and there is no way around it. I’ve also explained below how racehorses benefit in yet another, more nuanced manner (as a result of lowered blood pressure).

    I have also cited and linked to scientific studies which conclude both that Lasix does, in fact, improve performance, and that it is not due primarily to the reduction of EIPH.

    Juxtapose those FACTS with your argument, which consists of the utterly unscientific, vague, and one-legged claim that times haven’t improved.

    Please.

  • SteveG

    I suppose we should dispense with all urinalysis & blood testing, then, for PEDs other than lasix since “race times have remained relatively unchanged for decades.”  Must be a squeaky clean environment…

    Because if you’re going to hold up static race times as an argument that lasix is not a performance enhancer, then the known (and unknown) performance enhancers aren’t doing their jobs, either.

    In think the race time argument is fallacious, I’m afraid.

  • Steve M

    You might argue that oats are performance enhancing because they provide energy not gained eating grass/hay. Are oats performance enhancing? 

    If a horse isn’t getting faster or stronger than what’s the performance enhancement advantage of furosemide?  FACT: Race times are a benchmark. They haven’t improved. 

    Read the NTRA presentations (again?) that were made by leading veterinarians on the topic of EIPH. FACT: 75% of T-bred racehorses bleed and furosemide safely helps them.

    Perhaps your issue is with the recognized professionals who contradict your position? There’s also the South African Study demonstrating furosemide helps horse health. This was authored by a Dean of a veterinary college. You might try him. 

    To ask a horse to perform an unnatural athletic feat and then deprive them of a legal/safe medication proven to address that condition is inhumane.

    Spend some time arguing about catching the cheaters or protecting the horses that are whipped too much. 

  • Tinky

    Really, Steve, you’re being ridiculous.

    I have stated facts that show why Lasix is considered to be performance enhancing by every sporting body in the world, and explained the simple mechanism(s) by which this occurs.

    There are easily accessible scientific studies done of Thoroughbreds that have demonstrated these facts in action.

    And your response is to argue that the times for Thoroughbreds haven’t gotten faster? That is simply not a serious argument.

    Please do name some of the “recognized professionals” who contradict the position of the Mayo Clinic, every major sporting body in the world, and the scientists (to use just one example) who have concluded that “Improvement of performance in the furosemide trials was due more to the weight-loss related effects of the drug than its apparent alleviation of EIPH.” (link to study in my post below)

    Finally, catching cheaters is extremely important, but unrelated to the question of Lasix use.

  • Steve M

    It’s not that the argument (rather “statement”) is fallacious but rather multi-faceted. “Drugs” in racing are related to deadening pain, creating excitation, or suppressing performance, as examples. Therefore these are both performance enhancing and suppressing. So testing is important for the health and welfare of the horse (and jockey). Not to mention the betting public. 

    As for race times perhaps the horse has achieved its mechanical limitation. That said – helping horses (with a legal Medication) from the effects of EIPH is proactive and humane. At least in the environment that exists today where horses are kept in stalls in high stress man made situations.

  • SteveG

    Perhaps I misunderstood & correct me if I’m wong.  I thought you said that static race times were proof that lasix was not a PED.

    My response was based on that statement which I found unsuppportable.

  • Kris

    There is a phrase that I heard almost everyday when I was in the Marine Corps:  Leadership by example.  If the chairman of The Jockey Club and his prominent relative refuse to lead then who will?  I don’t want to hear these men crying about having ‘skin in the game’ because troops going into battle have a hell of a lot more.
    Mr. Phipps, you have a wonderful racing and breeding operation, one that harks back to the ‘good old days’, but will you choose to lead?  Mr. Irwin, will you choose to lead?  
    Once upon a time I was fortunate enough to own a few racehorses and although those days are over I can honestly state that I refused to allow my horses to race on any medication; none whatsoever.  I slept pretty damned well, too.

  • Kris

    There is a phrase that I heard almost everyday when I was in the Marine Corps:  Leadership by example.  If the chairman of The Jockey Club and his prominent relative refuse to lead then who will?  I don’t want to hear these men crying about having ‘skin in the game’ because troops going into battle have a hell of a lot more.
    Mr. Phipps, you have a wonderful racing and breeding operation, one that harks back to the ‘good old days’, but will you choose to lead?  Mr. Irwin, will you choose to lead?  
    Once upon a time I was fortunate enough to own a few racehorses and although those days are over I can honestly state that I refused to allow my horses to race on any medication; none whatsoever.  I slept pretty damned well, too.

  • Tiznowbaby

    We could say a buzzer in the jockey’s whip encourages a horse to try harder, thus running their very best. Should we allow that too?

  • Barney Door

    Yes, Helen, you are guessing and you are guessing wrong.

  • Lex. Trainer

    If Lasix is a performance enhancer then the obvious question is:  by how much?

    How many lengths does Lasix consistently improve performance?

    I know the answer must be pretty high since all of these owners are willing to put their beloved horses at a health risk just to use it.

  • Lex. Trainer

    If Lasix is a performance enhancer then the obvious question is:  by how much?

    How many lengths does Lasix consistently improve performance?

    I know the answer must be pretty high since all of these owners are willing to put their beloved horses at a health risk just to use it.

  • saint999

    Lasix does enhance performance past a horse’s natural ability by dehydrating the horse beyond the normal which causes excess weight loss. In a small studiy the excess weight was added as a handicap and there went the increased performance. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

    IF YOU WANT TO BAN LASIX FIND A BETTER DRUG BECAUSE HORSES WILL DIE FROM BLEEDING RIDERS WILL BE KILLED I HATE THAT HORSE HAVE TO USE LASIX BUT ITS BETTER THEN DEATH AND ALL HORSE AFTER THE USE OFF LASIX CAN HAVE HAPPY SHOW LIVES BUT IF THEY BLEED AND BLEED THERE DONE !!LASIX DEHYDRATES HORSES AND MAKES THEM WEAK IT IS NOT A PERFORMANCE ENHANCER ITS A NECESSARY EVIL ,TRY SOME AND SEE HOW YOU FEEL OR JUST ASK A JOCKEY THAT’S REDUCING AND TAKING LASIX HOW WEAK HE FEELS !

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

    IF YOU WANT TO BAN LASIX FIND A BETTER DRUG BECAUSE HORSES WILL DIE FROM BLEEDING RIDERS WILL BE KILLED I HATE THAT HORSE HAVE TO USE LASIX BUT ITS BETTER THEN DEATH AND ALL HORSE AFTER THE USE OFF LASIX CAN HAVE HAPPY SHOW LIVES BUT IF THEY BLEED AND BLEED THERE DONE !!LASIX DEHYDRATES HORSES AND MAKES THEM WEAK IT IS NOT A PERFORMANCE ENHANCER ITS A NECESSARY EVIL ,TRY SOME AND SEE HOW YOU FEEL OR JUST ASK A JOCKEY THAT’S REDUCING AND TAKING LASIX HOW WEAK HE FEELS !

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

    IF YOU WANT TO BAN LASIX FIND A BETTER DRUG BECAUSE HORSES WILL DIE FROM BLEEDING RIDERS WILL BE KILLED I HATE THAT HORSE HAVE TO USE LASIX BUT ITS BETTER THEN DEATH AND ALL HORSE AFTER THE USE OFF LASIX CAN HAVE HAPPY SHOW LIVES BUT IF THEY BLEED AND BLEED THERE DONE !!LASIX DEHYDRATES HORSES AND MAKES THEM WEAK IT IS NOT A PERFORMANCE ENHANCER ITS A NECESSARY EVIL ,TRY SOME AND SEE HOW YOU FEEL OR JUST ASK A JOCKEY THAT’S REDUCING AND TAKING LASIX HOW WEAK HE FEELS !

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

    IF YOU WANT TO BAN LASIX FIND A BETTER DRUG BECAUSE HORSES WILL DIE FROM BLEEDING RIDERS WILL BE KILLED I HATE THAT HORSE HAVE TO USE LASIX BUT ITS BETTER THEN DEATH AND ALL HORSE AFTER THE USE OFF LASIX CAN HAVE HAPPY SHOW LIVES BUT IF THEY BLEED AND BLEED THERE DONE !!LASIX DEHYDRATES HORSES AND MAKES THEM WEAK IT IS NOT A PERFORMANCE ENHANCER ITS A NECESSARY EVIL ,TRY SOME AND SEE HOW YOU FEEL OR JUST ASK A JOCKEY THAT’S REDUCING AND TAKING LASIX HOW WEAK HE FEELS !

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

    IF YOU WANT TO BAN LASIX FIND A BETTER DRUG BECAUSE HORSES WILL DIE FROM BLEEDING RIDERS WILL BE KILLED I HATE THAT HORSE HAVE TO USE LASIX BUT ITS BETTER THEN DEATH AND ALL HORSE AFTER THE USE OFF LASIX CAN HAVE HAPPY SHOW LIVES BUT IF THEY BLEED AND BLEED THERE DONE !!LASIX DEHYDRATES HORSES AND MAKES THEM WEAK IT IS NOT A PERFORMANCE ENHANCER ITS A NECESSARY EVIL ,TRY SOME AND SEE HOW YOU FEEL OR JUST ASK A JOCKEY THAT’S REDUCING AND TAKING LASIX HOW WEAK HE FEELS !

    love horses then please stop [Destruction of Hyaline Cartilage / joint corticosteroid injections] !!! tracks banned steroid ??NO!!. RACE HORSES CAN HAVE corticosteroid injections 7 TO 10 DAY’S BEFORE EVERY RACE !!
    AND AT PARX OUR STATE VETS TOLD MY TRAINER NEXT TIME YOU SHOULD INJ THAT OR SHOCK WAVE THAT KILLS NERVES SO THEY GO SOUND BEFORE YOU ENTER HIM, . WHY TO COVER UP THAT HE’S SORE ON RACE DAY!!!?? GOOD TRAINERS DO NOT !! ok we may have too give the horse30 day’s in between races ,OMG ! O AND THAT HORSE IS ON THE BOARD EVERY TIME, OK HE RAN BAD 2 TIMES OUT OF 12 RACES AND YES HE IS A LITTLE SORE AND HAS BEEN THE SAME ALL YEAR BUT BETTER THE HORSE NOW HE’S ISSUE THEN NOT,AND SHOCK WAVE IS GREAT IF USED CORRECTLY NOT DAYS BEFORE A RACE TOO ACT LIKE A BLOCK!! with no one REGULATING!!!! THE USE OF STEROID ,{corticosteroid injections } I can not count how many horses broke down this month maybe 10 ? AND some horses were put down on racetrack. { some are sent too track grave yard to be but down ] and we hope some go home ?? We had a outrage when eight bells broke down, if people only knew the truth!!! ABOUT how many horses break down in the AM !!
    !!!!!!!!!! Cortisone!!!!!!!!!!!! is the lay term for an injectable substance that has properties almost identical to the naturally occurring steroid produced by the adrenal glands within our bodies, typically activated during periods of intense stress, injury or inflammation.To a large degree, corticosteroid injections are used primarily to treat moderate to severe inflammation, AND FOR HUMANS ITS CONTROLLED MAX USE 3 TIMES and whose treatment is beyond the scope of oral medications, as well as other lesser treatment options like topical agents, ultrasound and therapy. Destruction of Hyaline CartilageOur joints are covered by a smooth, resilient and plush type of cartilage called hyaline cartilage. It provides almost frictionless movement between two bone surfaces of a joint, as well as provide cushion to the weight-bearing joints.Long-term usage of cortisone injections into a joint can result in the degradation and ultimate destruction of this cartilage, effectively worsening the very condition it was meant to treat.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

    IF YOU WANT TO BAN LASIX FIND A BETTER DRUG BECAUSE HORSES WILL DIE FROM BLEEDING RIDERS WILL BE KILLED I HATE THAT HORSE HAVE TO USE LASIX BUT ITS BETTER THEN DEATH AND ALL HORSE AFTER THE USE OFF LASIX CAN HAVE HAPPY SHOW LIVES BUT IF THEY BLEED AND BLEED THERE DONE !!LASIX DEHYDRATES HORSES AND MAKES THEM WEAK IT IS NOT A PERFORMANCE ENHANCER ITS A NECESSARY EVIL ,TRY SOME AND SEE HOW YOU FEEL OR JUST ASK A JOCKEY THAT’S REDUCING AND TAKING LASIX HOW WEAK HE FEELS !

    love horses then please stop [Destruction of Hyaline Cartilage / joint corticosteroid injections] !!! tracks banned steroid ??NO!!. RACE HORSES CAN HAVE corticosteroid injections 7 TO 10 DAY’S BEFORE EVERY RACE !!
    AND AT PARX OUR STATE VETS TOLD MY TRAINER NEXT TIME YOU SHOULD INJ THAT OR SHOCK WAVE THAT KILLS NERVES SO THEY GO SOUND BEFORE YOU ENTER HIM, . WHY TO COVER UP THAT HE’S SORE ON RACE DAY!!!?? GOOD TRAINERS DO NOT !! ok we may have too give the horse30 day’s in between races ,OMG ! O AND THAT HORSE IS ON THE BOARD EVERY TIME, OK HE RAN BAD 2 TIMES OUT OF 12 RACES AND YES HE IS A LITTLE SORE AND HAS BEEN THE SAME ALL YEAR BUT BETTER THE HORSE NOW HE’S ISSUE THEN NOT,AND SHOCK WAVE IS GREAT IF USED CORRECTLY NOT DAYS BEFORE A RACE TOO ACT LIKE A BLOCK!! with no one REGULATING!!!! THE USE OF STEROID ,{corticosteroid injections } I can not count how many horses broke down this month maybe 10 ? AND some horses were put down on racetrack. { some are sent too track grave yard to be but down ] and we hope some go home ?? We had a outrage when eight bells broke down, if people only knew the truth!!! ABOUT how many horses break down in the AM !!
    !!!!!!!!!! Cortisone!!!!!!!!!!!! is the lay term for an injectable substance that has properties almost identical to the naturally occurring steroid produced by the adrenal glands within our bodies, typically activated during periods of intense stress, injury or inflammation.To a large degree, corticosteroid injections are used primarily to treat moderate to severe inflammation, AND FOR HUMANS ITS CONTROLLED MAX USE 3 TIMES and whose treatment is beyond the scope of oral medications, as well as other lesser treatment options like topical agents, ultrasound and therapy. Destruction of Hyaline CartilageOur joints are covered by a smooth, resilient and plush type of cartilage called hyaline cartilage. It provides almost frictionless movement between two bone surfaces of a joint, as well as provide cushion to the weight-bearing joints.Long-term usage of cortisone injections into a joint can result in the degradation and ultimate destruction of this cartilage, effectively worsening the very condition it was meant to treat.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

      Banning LasixBanning LasixBleeding is a huge problem with racing and my thoughtsof America banning Lasix. If we do ban Lasix, and have not done some research andcome up with an alternate plan that stops the bleeding, I think that we’ll more than doublethe number of horses that die on the racetrack. I’m not sure what has caused the bleedingto get so bad over the years. It could be the use of anabolic steroids, the pre-race drugs sale horses SPEED ! without the use of Lasix you would probably have 90% bleed and 10% bleed to death on the track. If you have ever seen a horse bleed todeath it’s not a pretty picture. , in a race sometimes they can be bleeding so badout of their nose and in the horses lung, also dangerous for all the riders .As they get closer to death they collapse and die in a puddle of their own blood. Thingsare bad enough with the breakdowns for our horses, fans and owners, we don’t need toadd this to the mix.Don’t get me wrong I would love to eliminate Lasix but its better then horses bleeding and my rescue race horse never have any side effect from lasix. IF A race horse has too many joint inj they can not have a chance fore a second career!!and NO ONE IS REGULATING HOW MANY TIMES A HORSE CAN BE INJECTED ! as a person your doctor would never inject you more then 3 times but as a race horse ?? after every race ?AND SHOCK WAVE AS A NERVE BLOCK and i can go on about good drugs in the wrong hands !!! OUR STATE VET telling trainer’s to use above drug so the horse looks sound for the race ! um good cover up that we have state vets watching horse’s on race day yes every horse has a issue but they can manage it safer without the cover up ! !maybe I should wright a book ! It seems to me that a lot of people arejust focused on lasix! why not stop STEROIDS !THIS IS WHY horse’s end up at the killers! o and let me add lack of horsemanship!!!!!!!!!! Cortisone!!!!!!!!!!!! is the lay term for an inject able substance that has properties almost identical to the naturally occurring steroid produced by the adrenal glands within our bodies, typically activated during periods of intense stress, injury or inflammation.To a large degree, corticosteroid injections are used primarily to treat moderate to severe inflammation, AND FOR HUMANS ITS CONTROLLED MAX USE 3 TIMES and whose treatment is beyond the scope of oral medications, as well as other lesser treatment options like topical agents, ultrasound and therapy.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Destruction of Hyaline Cartilage!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Our joints are covered by a smooth, resilient and plush type of cartilage called hyaline cartilage. It provides almost frictionless movement between two bone surfaces of a joint, as well as provide cushion to the weight-bearing joints.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tbrescue Jackie Schuyler

      Banning LasixBanning LasixBleeding is a huge problem with racing and my thoughtsof America banning Lasix. If we do ban Lasix, and have not done some research andcome up with an alternate plan that stops the bleeding, I think that we’ll more than doublethe number of horses that die on the racetrack. I’m not sure what has caused the bleedingto get so bad over the years. It could be the use of anabolic steroids, the pre-race drugs sale horses SPEED ! without the use of Lasix you would probably have 90% bleed and 10% bleed to death on the track. If you have ever seen a horse bleed todeath it’s not a pretty picture. , in a race sometimes they can be bleeding so badout of their nose and in the horses lung, also dangerous for all the riders .As they get closer to death they collapse and die in a puddle of their own blood. Thingsare bad enough with the breakdowns for our horses, fans and owners, we don’t need toadd this to the mix.Don’t get me wrong I would love to eliminate Lasix but its better then horses bleeding and my rescue race horse never have any side effect from lasix. IF A race horse has too many joint inj they can not have a chance fore a second career!!and NO ONE IS REGULATING HOW MANY TIMES A HORSE CAN BE INJECTED ! as a person your doctor would never inject you more then 3 times but as a race horse ?? after every race ?AND SHOCK WAVE AS A NERVE BLOCK and i can go on about good drugs in the wrong hands !!! OUR STATE VET telling trainer’s to use above drug so the horse looks sound for the race ! um good cover up that we have state vets watching horse’s on race day yes every horse has a issue but they can manage it safer without the cover up ! !maybe I should wright a book ! It seems to me that a lot of people arejust focused on lasix! why not stop STEROIDS !THIS IS WHY horse’s end up at the killers! o and let me add lack of horsemanship!!!!!!!!!! Cortisone!!!!!!!!!!!! is the lay term for an inject able substance that has properties almost identical to the naturally occurring steroid produced by the adrenal glands within our bodies, typically activated during periods of intense stress, injury or inflammation.To a large degree, corticosteroid injections are used primarily to treat moderate to severe inflammation, AND FOR HUMANS ITS CONTROLLED MAX USE 3 TIMES and whose treatment is beyond the scope of oral medications, as well as other lesser treatment options like topical agents, ultrasound and therapy.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Destruction of Hyaline Cartilage!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Our joints are covered by a smooth, resilient and plush type of cartilage called hyaline cartilage. It provides almost frictionless movement between two bone surfaces of a joint, as well as provide cushion to the weight-bearing joints.

Twitter