One horse dead in overturned van carrying Toner horses from Florida to Maryland

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Five Thoroughbreds en route from Palm Meadows training center in Florida to Fair Hill in Maryland were being treated at Edisto Equine Clinic in Yonges Island, S.C., after a van carrying them overturned on Interstate 95 at about 7:30 p.m. Wednesday evening 10 miles south of Walterboro. A sixth horse in the van had to be euthanized.

The van was one of two that left Palm Meadows Wednesday morning, according to Jimmy Toner, who trains all but one of the horses involved. Toner said he was still trying to determine the identify of the horse that died. The horses were owned by AJ Suited Racing, according to a post on the stable’s Facebook page.

Not travelling on the van that jackknifed and overturned was Phillips Racing Partnership’s Grade 1-winning mare Winter Memories, who left Palm Meadows at 6 a.m. and arrived at Belmont Park. “She is safe and sound,” a relieved Toner told the Paulick Report Thursday morning. The van that crashed left at 11 a.m., Toner said.

The driver of the van that overturned and two grooms traveling with the horses did not suffer serious injuries, Toner said, though he said it was his understanding one of the grooms required stitches at a local hospital. The van was owned by Ebert Vans, Inc., of Elmont, N.Y.

Toner, who was leaving Florida for New York on Thursday, said none of the surviving horses – to the best of his knowledge – were said to have serious injuries. “Some were cut up and needed stitches,” he said.

“The van was on its side and they had to cut the roof off to get the horses out,” said Toner.

The accident occurred during a rainstorm and may have been caused when a car ahead of the horse van suddenly stopped. The van went off the shoulder of the road, jackknifed, and overturned, according to reports.

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  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    hard to believe only one passed (our thoughts r with the owner)…the driver & rescue personal must have had their act together & should b commended…the drivers that transport Horses all over the country r some of the best on the planet… 

    • Will

      I’d have to disagree… lucky it wasn’t more serious in terms of injuries and fatalities. However, the driver should not be commended for getting in an accident that killed a horse and injured others. He was driving too close and/or too fast in bad conditions. 

      • Hossracergp

        You don’t know how close the driver was to the car in front of him. It’s an unfair statement to make with zero proof to back it up.

      • Caton Bredar

        My father owned and operated a horse van company for 20 years and was killed in an accident hauling horses–overturned van caused by another vehicle hitting a pot hole and veering into his lane.   He swerved to avoid the people in the other vehicle possibly saving their lives.  The horses he was hauling were saved as well–his was the only casualty.  It’s best to use caution when assigning responsibility until having complete knowledge of all facts.  Anyone who drives for a living will tell you it’s an extremely risky profession for even the safest and most skilled of drivers. 

      • driver96

         And how do you know that he was driving too fast or too close?? Were you in the truck? I didnt think so. You obviously are not a truck driver by any means and have no understanding of what it is like to drive a tractor trailer especially in the rain with livestock on. Its a terrible seen and you want to try to blame somebody when you dont know all the facts. I would imagine you are one of those people that cuts trucks off all the time and doesn’t even think twice about it.

        • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

          AMEN AGAIN!!!…TY…

      • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

        U MUST HAVE BEEN THERE???…BS…

      • Cass

         No matter how carefully you drive a tractor trailer or any other type of horse trailer, cars will always pull in front of you.  The more room you leave between you and a car the more you know someone will pull into that space.  Car drivers have no idea what it takes to stop a trailer

        • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

          85% OF AMERCIANS CAN’T DRIVE A NAIL!!!…

      • aa0022

        How the heck do you know Will? Did you conduct the investigation?

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    hard to believe only one passed (our thoughts r with the owner)…the driver & rescue personal must have had their act together & should b commended…the drivers that transport Horses all over the country r some of the best on the planet… 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Luis-E-Astacio/1437755043 Luis E Astacio

    This is areally sad situation,because the horses most of the times are tie up and when this occurs they are not free to get abetter position in the van.This time they were lucky that just one horse lost its life.Glad to hear the grooms were not badly injured.Wishing speedy recovery for everyone involved.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Luis-E-Astacio/1437755043 Luis E Astacio

    This is areally sad situation,because the horses most of the times are tie up and when this occurs they are not free to get abetter position in the van.This time they were lucky that just one horse lost its life.Glad to hear the grooms were not badly injured.Wishing speedy recovery for everyone involved.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/MyBig-Red/100000980578079 MyBig Red

    Yes, the rain was coming down hard yesterday where I live in South Carolina.
    My thoughts & prayers are with the horses, their owners & grooms and the driver. 
    I try to stay off I-95, because most of the people drive like idiots & they seem to always be in a hurry, despite the bad weather conditions.

    • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

      85% of AMERCIANS CAN’T DRIVE A LICK & THEY HAVE NO CLUE ABOUT COMMON COURTESY…BOOK THAT!!!…

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/MyBig-Red/100000980578079 MyBig Red

    Yes, the rain was coming down hard yesterday where I live in South Carolina.
    My thoughts & prayers are with the horses, their owners & grooms and the driver. 
    I try to stay off I-95, because most of the people drive like idiots & they seem to always be in a hurry, despite the bad weather conditions.

  • Will

    I’d have to disagree… lucky it wasn’t more serious in terms of injuries and fatalities. However, the driver should not be commended for getting in an accident that killed a horse and injured others. He was driving too close and/or too fast in bad conditions. 

  • Hossracergp

    You don’t know how close the driver was to the car in front of him. It’s an unfair statement to make with zero proof to back it up.

  • Caton Bredar

    My father owned and operated a horse van company for 20 years and was killed in an accident hauling horses–overturned van caused by another vehicle hitting a pot hole and veering into his lane.   He swerved to avoid the people in the other vehicle possibly saving their lives.  The horses he was hauling were saved as well–his was the only casualty.  It’s best to use caution when assigning responsibility until having complete knowledge of all facts.  Anyone who drives for a living will tell you it’s an extremely risky profession for even the safest and most skilled of drivers. 

  • driver96

     And how do you know that he was driving too fast or too close?? Were you in the truck? I didnt think so. You obviously are not a truck driver by any means and have no understanding of what it is like to drive a tractor trailer especially in the rain with livestock on. Its a terrible seen and you want to try to blame somebody when you dont know all the facts. I would imagine you are one of those people that cuts trucks off all the time and doesn’t even think twice about it.

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    U MUST HAVE BEEN THERE???…BS…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    AMEN…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    AMEN AGAIN!!!…TY…

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    85% of AMERCIANS CAN’T DRIVE A LICK & THEY HAVE NO CLUE ABOUT COMMON COURTESY…BOOK THAT!!!…

  • Cass

     No matter how carefully you drive a tractor trailer or any other type of horse trailer, cars will always pull in front of you.  The more room you leave between you and a car the more you know someone will pull into that space.  Car drivers have no idea what it takes to stop a trailer

  • Windyblue

    My husband was a truck driver of horses and cattle for many years and he always said that is the hardest type of driving a truck, because live stock are the hardest items to haul because they are not like regular frieght.  And when a car pulls in front of them they are trying to protect the horses and the stupid people in the car.  People forget that they are driving an 80,000 or more truck and can’t stop on a dime.  Thank the drivers for doing the best that they could.

  • Windyblue

    My husband was a truck driver of horses and cattle for many years and he always said that is the hardest type of driving a truck, because live stock are the hardest items to haul because they are not like regular frieght.  And when a car pulls in front of them they are trying to protect the horses and the stupid people in the car.  People forget that they are driving an 80,000 or more truck and can’t stop on a dime.  Thank the drivers for doing the best that they could.

  • http://www.facebook.com/rebecca.gimenez Rebecca Gimenez
  • aa0022

    How the heck do you know Will? Did you conduct the investigation?

  • http://Bellwether4u.com James Staples

    75% OF AMERCIANS CAN’T DRIVE A LICK!!!…

  • in tears

    You are all missing the big point here. The driver was carrying live animals. Even the slightest movement of the steering wheel is felt ten times more in the trailer. Horses react by shifting their weight for balance. If there is a sudden or quick change in driving the animals try to compensate with a weight shift. Traveling on a straight road a experienced driver could do traffic speeds. BUT on turns or exiting ramps or getting off the road onto a shoulder (the roll over side) doing these actions at too fast a driving speed force horses to shift their weight creating potential accidents and life threatening injuries for the horses being hauled.

    For a horse to go into a enclosed trailer is a act of faith on the animals part, trusting the handler/driver. The best way to understand this is to take a ride in the trailer while someone drives giving the person in the trailer a smooth ride and a rough “scarey” ride. Only than could a person understand what a horse goes through traveling in a trailer. This scarey ride if the reason many horses are “bad” loaders.

  • in tears

    You are all missing the big point here. The driver was carrying live animals. Even the slightest movement of the steering wheel is felt ten times more in the trailer. Horses react by shifting their weight for balance. If there is a sudden or quick change in driving the animals try to compensate with a weight shift. Traveling on a straight road a experienced driver could do traffic speeds. BUT on turns or exiting ramps or getting off the road onto a shoulder (the roll over side) doing these actions at too fast a driving speed force horses to shift their weight creating potential accidents and life threatening injuries for the horses being hauled.

    For a horse to go into a enclosed trailer is a act of faith on the animals part, trusting the handler/driver. The best way to understand this is to take a ride in the trailer while someone drives giving the person in the trailer a smooth ride and a rough “scarey” ride. Only than could a person understand what a horse goes through traveling in a trailer. This scarey ride if the reason many horses are “bad” loaders.

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