Oklahoma Racing Commission cracks down … sort of

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Thursday morning at Remington Park in Oklahoma City, Okla., the Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission will be discussing the case of a horseman who submitted his name as the trainer of a starter in a race, when in fact the horse was actually trained by someone else.

This type of incident, use of a “program trainer,” is often done when an individual is unable to get stalls at a certain track or even a racing license – for whatever reason ­­– and asks someone else to do them a favor and run the horse in his or her name.

It’s encouraging to see the Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission – under the direction of chairman Becky Goumaz and executive director Constanin Rieger – take this type of issue seriously. When a trainer runs one of his horses in someone else’s name – especially in cases where that trainer is unable to do so because of licensing issues or regulatory problems – the integrity of racing is brought into question. And integrity is what racing commissioners are appointed to uphold.

I’m just sorry the case of the program trainer in Oklahoma involves Michael Gass II and Frank Gladd, along with a horse named Bring Her Home, and NOT Rick Dutrow and William Cesare and a horse named Willy Beamin. Or even Tony Dutrow, Rick Dutrow’s brother, and a horse named Redeemed.

Bring Her Home is a maiden claimer trained by Gladd, who was unable to get stalls at Remington Park. Gladd allegedly asked if Gass would stable Bring Her Home in one of the stalls allotted to him and run the filly in his name. Gass did so for several races in late 2011.

Around that same time, Rick Dutrow, the trainer of Jay Em Ess Stable’s Redeemed, sent the colt to Remington Park to contest the Oklahoma Derby, except Redeemed ran in the name of Tony Dutrow when he won the $400,000 race. In his next start, the Discovery Handicap, at Aqueduct, he was back running in Rick’s name.

Is it possible Rick Dutrow was unable to be licensed in Oklahoma in 2011, but the Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission allowed the horse to run anyway, in the name of his brother Tony?

Let’s fast forward a year to the 2012 Oklahoma Derby, when James Riccio’s Redeemed was sent to Remington to compete for the first time since he raced in Rick Dutrow’s name in August at Saratoga, winning the Grade 1 King’s Bishop.

In the year between the 2011 and ’12 Oklahoma Derby, the Dutrow brothers were involved in a horse transfer controversy in West Virginia, when Rick Dutrow-trained I Want Revenge was entered to race in the name of brother Tony at Charles Town. Stewards there got wise as to who the actual trainer was and refused to let the horse race. Good for them.

For the 2012 Oklahoma Derby, Willy Beamin was transferred not to Tony Dutrow but to William Cesare, just in time to ship to Remington Park and go for the giant pot. Rick Dutrow is not licensed in Oklahoma and did not apply for a license, according to the commission’s spokesperson, attorney Mary Ann Roberts (the only individual at the commission who responds to press inquiries from Paulick Report). Roberts said Willy Beamin was nominated by Cesare and entered by Cesare, so the commission was satisfied that Cesare was the actual trainer of the horse.

There you have it. The Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission’s wink-wink, nudge-nudge definition of integrity. and it’s crackdown … sort of … on program trainers

Oh, by the way, Willy Beamin, who wound up second in the Oklahoma Derby, is racing this weekend at Aqueduct in the Discovery Handicap, the same race in which Redeemed returned to action following his race in Oklahoma.

You get one guess who is listed as Willy Beamin’s trainer for the Discovery.

As I said, it’s encouraging to see the Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission go after a small-time trainer who allegedly tried to juke the system with his maiden claimer. But I have to wonder why they don’t seem to care about determining the actual trainer of a horse competing in a $400,000 stakes race.

Maybe that’s a question Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin should be asking of her horse racing commission.

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  • Tbhorseman

    Typical let’s pick on the small guy because we don’t have the guts to go after someone big.  One of the main reasons I am thinking of leaving the game.

    • nu-fan

      Tbhorseman: This is interesting in that it is in reverse as to what happens for most businesses and the federal/state/local government agencies. They usually go after the big businesses for infractions because they are industry leaders. If they go after big businesses, it usually makes a case that they will go after the others. And, it makes the news. Wonder why horseracing hasn’t figured that out?  

      • Tinky

        “This is interesting in that it is in reverse as to what happens for most businesses and the federal/state/local government agencies. They usually go after the big businesses for infractions because they are industry leaders.”

        This would be hilarious if it weren’t so sad. Perhaps that is how it is taught in universities, but in real life? Consider the fact that not a single Wall Street executive has been charged, let alone convicted of any crime.

        When major corporations are found guilty of something, the fines levied are invariably trivial relative to revenues. Cost of doing business.

        There are millions of poor, small time drug users and dealers in prison, while the CIA supports major cartels in order to support their superiors twisted policy goals.

        Etc., etc., etc.

        • nu-fan

          Tinky:  In some cases that is true, especially when politics gets involved as well as economics.  But, there have been some big players on Wall Street that have been indicted.   While it may seem like there is an inequity in justice, at times, it is important to not paint with too broad a brush.  Lastly, I have worked for large corporations as well as known about our competitors who were constantly reviewed by every governmental agency known to mankind and fines (heavy ones at that) were levied far more often than ever made the news.  Also, lawsuits by individuals rarely target the small businesses.  They go after the deep pockets.  I’m not getting into a discussion on the drug war.  Too many are involved.  That war was lost a long time ago.   And, that, Tinky is what real life is about.  And, your comment about universities shows a bit of a disrespect for education.  Why?  You don’t think that universities offer real world understanding? Hmmmm.

          • Tinky

            Which big players on Wall Street have been indicted since the crash of 2008? Please do list them.

            With regard to universities, it depends on one’s perspective. In many respects, American universities have failed in recent decades to educate students to the realities of life. This is due, in part, to the corruption of the process, as, for example, economics is taught by professors who (too often) themselves have been co-opted by monied interests.

            I certainly agree that it is dangerous to point with too broad a brush, but the fact is that large corporations essentially run this country today. They own most politicians through obscene lobbying, and write much of the regulation that is supposed to keep them honest.

            The financial crisis is Exhibit A. The banking industry is MORE concentrated now than it was before the crash. There has been no serious regulation reform (Dodd-Frank is a watered down joke), and the system is MORE fragile now than it was before the ’08 collapse.

            We are inexorably headed for another, even bigger crisis, and the American public apparently won’t begin to wake up until things get really bad.

          • nu-fan

            Tinky:  Didn’t know you wanted to limit this to only 2008.  Changed the parameters did you?  But, some of the Wall Street and industry leaders who have been toppled in “recent” years are:  Dennis Koslowski, Jeff Skilling, Bernard Ebgers, Kenneth Lay, Andrew Fastow, Bernie Maddoff…..  In banking, unfortunately, there haven’t been any that I can think of this moment.  But, they did follow the rules.  Perhaps, it is the leadership of this country who made those rules that need to be reviewed for not doing a better job with the financial industry.   But, regardless, you really might want to consider taking some anger-management classes.  I’ve seen more than one of your comments in recent weeks and they are hostile toward far too many of the readers.  And, nothing like blaming everyone else for your woes.  If we are headed for another crisis, there are plenty of people to blame and the public cannot exclude themselves.  Many over-extended themselves on material things that they could not afford and, then, expected everyone else to bail them out–including the banks who were granted this opportunity by our elected officials.  Many of these citizens elected some of the politicians who promise the moon and never explain who is going to pay for it.  But, there are too many people who did not get caught up in their indulgences and are surviving quite well–and, do not go around blaming others for their own predicament.  And, I have never had any impression that any of the professors that I knew were anything other than what they were–dedicated.  This discussion is over!

          • LongTimeEconomist

            Don’t forgot that fat Indian and all the other people he was involved with. 

          • Lou Baranello

            nu-fan, I commend you!

          • Tinky

            It should have been obvious that I was referring to post-crash, and it is absurd to believe that haven’t none have been indicted because they “followed the rules”. 

            With regard to the tone of any of my posts, that is not relevant to the substance. As it happens I am doing very well personally, and am therefore not blaming anyone for MY predicament. 

            While individuals certainly bear some responsibility, the general population has clearly been abused upon by bad governance, corporate behavior, predatory lending, etc. The system is broken, and the fact that the general population hasn’t yet corrected the problem by throwing the bums out, and replacing them with radically different politicians, does not excuse any of the corrupt behavior.

            Larry Summers and Glenn Hubbard, two ‘educators’ from well known universities, played important roles in helping to create the economic crisis, and in keeping the disastrous status quo in its aftermath.

            There are, of course, many good and dedicated educators out there. But there are also many who have been corrupted by the system, and to be blind to this fact is to invite further systemic problems.

          • Beknighted

            Indeed Tinky worry not as the discussion does continue. I admire your cynical stoicism….. And by the way i survived several universities despite the “dedicated” professors who all believed they held the intellectual mandate of heaven.

          • Tinky

            “I have never had any impression that any of the professors that I knew were anything other than what they were–dedicated.”

            The question is, dedicated to what?

            How many professors in our university system teach their students to question authority? To question the mainstream media? To question orthodox American history? Etc.

            Too few, I’m afraid.

      • Tbhorseman

        That is how horse racing is.  Make a stand, send a small time guy to his professional demise and let the big wheels roll on.   The racetracks do not want the guys with the 100 horses to get in any trouble so they can continue to fill races and the big trainers have the big owners who they do not want to embarrass.   If anything happens they throw the horses in the assistants name and using the same tack and employees never stop the machine.   Their are hundreds of guys like me out there that play by the rules and get trampled on.   Once I sent a set of foal papers to another track not the horse just the papers and was threatened to have my stalls taken from me while the big outfits sent horses there to race on a weekly basis.

        • nu-fan

          Tbhorseman:  What do you see as a solution?  I understand your comment and it, frankly, makes sense.  But, what do you see as a solution for this?  I’ve read comments from other trainers who have expressed similar viewpoints as yours.  They play by the rules and get penalized while others get away with everything but the kitchen sink. 

          • Tbhorseman

            First a national governing body with a clear set of rules…

            Some way to have a horse under guard 72 hours prior to a race to stop the drug abuse.

            Limit the number of stalls any one trainer can have at a racetrack.  I think this would take away the leverage the big guys have.

          • nu-fan

            Tbhorseman:  Thank you for your reply.  I don’t know enough to comment about the number of stalls but I definitely have to agree with your first two suggestions.  There should be a standard set of rules, nationally, for horseracing since horses do cross state lines for this purpose.  It almost seems as if each racing jurisdiction is operated as a form of a fiefdom and stuck in the middle ages.  And, regardless of what some people in the industry may think, where there is money involved, there are some who are corrupt enough to try to alter the racing outcome.  For the amount of money invested in owning/training a horse, I would think a few dollars more spent in having my own security staff and video surveillance is just being smart.  By the way, I have not seen very much in the way of any information about those, who have participated in “serious” illegal activities, serving jail time.  Just some suspensions.  I don’t get that.  Need severe consequences for serious infractions.  At least, that’s my opinion. 

  • Tbhorseman

    Typical let’s pick on the small guy because we don’t have the guts to go after someone big.  One of the main reasons I am thinking of leaving the game.

  • Dan

    these small time tracks will always turn a blind eye to get a few upper level horses on their big days. 

  • Dan

    these small time tracks will always turn a blind eye to get a few upper level horses on their big days. 

  • nu-fan

    Tbhorseman: This is interesting in that it is in reverse as to what happens for most businesses and the federal/state/local government agencies. They usually go after the big businesses for infractions because they are industry leaders. If they go after big businesses, it usually makes a case that they will go after the others. And, it makes the news. Wonder why horseracing hasn’t figured that out?  

  • Trish

    I have to agree with Tbhorseman. The most egregious “program trainers” are the Pletchers and Asmussens of the world who have horses scattered everywhere, yet they might not see them for weeks. Can someone please tell me why these guys (and others like them) are not considered program trainers?

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UYBILIHAIFH2HKEJK43BBFJQCQ Chris

      They have strong assistant trainers at the tracks where they have stables, and at least at Remington Park the assistant is named.  Asmussen, Cody Autry, Danny Pish etc.

  • Trish

    I have to agree with Tbhorseman. The most egregious “program trainers” are the Pletchers and Asmussens of the world who have horses scattered everywhere, yet they might not see them for weeks. Can someone please tell me why these guys (and others like them) are not considered program trainers?

  • Aunt Bea

    Ray, seriously, racing has so many problems and all you care about is twisting the knife into Rick Dutrow?
    Seems like a pathological condition you’re afflicted with. I wonder why.

    • Tbhorseman

      How can you justify Dutrow and his numerous violations?  Everyone yells about great a horseman he is.  When the vet bill are larger than the training bill it makes you a drug trainer…

  • Aunt Bea

    Ray, seriously, racing has so many problems and all you care about is twisting the knife into Rick Dutrow?
    Seems like a pathological condition you’re afflicted with. I wonder why.

  • Tinky

    “This is interesting in that it is in reverse as to what happens for most businesses and the federal/state/local government agencies. They usually go after the big businesses for infractions because they are industry leaders.”

    This would be hilarious if it weren’t so sad. Perhaps that is how it is taught in universities, but in real life? Consider the fact that not a single Wall Street executive has been charged, let alone convicted of any crime.

    When major corporations are found guilty of something, the fines levied are invariably trivial relative to revenues. Cost of doing business.

    There are millions of poor, small time drug users and dealers in prison, while the CIA supports major cartels in order to support their superiors twisted policy goals.

    Etc., etc., etc.

  • Tbhorseman

    That is how horse racing is.  Make a stand, send a small time guy to his professional demise and let the big wheels roll on.   The racetracks do not want the guys with the 100 horses to get in any trouble so they can continue to fill races and the big trainers have the big owners who they do not want to embarrass.   If anything happens they throw the horses in the assistants name and using the same tack and employees never stop the machine.   Their are hundreds of guys like me out there that play by the rules and get trampled on.   Once I sent a set of foal papers to another track not the horse just the papers and was threatened to have my stalls taken from me while the big outfits sent horses there to race on a weekly basis.

  • Aunt Bea

    My take on the deal Ray, is that after Eight Belles broke down in the KY Derby that Big Brown won, YOU were the loudest voice that Rick Dutrow epitomized everything that was wrong with racing.
    Unrelenting, a constant barrage; soon thereafter, Ed Martin steps in, calling for a 10 yr ban. KY instantly denies him a license, as do some other states.
    I hope you’re happy with yourselves, as it’s all a bunch of ****ing nonsense that keeps you all patting each other on the back for Saving Racing. Good job, Ray, keep pocketing the money.

    • RayPaulick

      Yes, I’ve been terribly critical of Rick Dutrow, as in this Oct. 17, 2011 piece:

      http://www.paulickreport.com/news/ray-s-paddock/ask-ray-dutrow-frankel-and-those-whip-rules/
      I’m no fan of Dutrow, but I also believe in the principles of due process. The courts will decide whether or not his rights to due process were violated by the New York State Racing and Wagering Board’s decision to revoke his license for a minimum of 10 years.  Monday, Dutrow was granted a 30-day stay of the punishment, meaning he can continue training in New York while the process shifts to the courts.There are so many flaws in racing’s regulatory process it’s almost impossible to know where to begin in a critique of it. There is the lack of uniformity from one state to another, an absence of progressive penalties for habitual violators, too many wrist-slap penalties that fail to deter medication cheaters, an appeals process that has made a mockery of the system. Regulators in one state fail to look at a licensee’s record in other states when considering penalties for rule violations. In other words, you can be considered a first-time offender in Kentucky though you’ve had 20 medication violations in another state. The issue of reciprocity is also in question: after the Dutrow ruling, the California Horse Racing Board issued a statement saying he would not be able to train there, but what about New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Florida, Louisiana or other states?It all makes you wonder if racing wouldn’t be better off if federal legislation were written to create a national governing body (something, incidentally, I think the Dutrow ruling was designed to prevent).As for the Dutrow case, I’m not really sure what makes him that much different from any other repeat offender that merited this type of ban. As much as I want to see habitual cheaters thrown out of the sport, I think the cart may have gotten ahead of the horse here. Wouldn’t it be more prudent to first write rules that leave no doubt in a licensee’s mind about the possible sanctions he or she faces with repeat violations? New York officials threw the book at Dutrow, even though we’re not sure what’s really in that book, and I think that hurts the chances of the ruling being sustained in the courts.The two violations that were the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back in the Dutrow matter involved butorphanol and xyzaline (syringes with said drug were found in his barn). In Maryland, a butorphanol positive netted a trainer a 30-day suspension for a positive post-race test, and a xyzaline positive in Pennsylvania resulted in a disqualification and $1,500 fine for the trainer.  Dutrow got a $50,000 fine and a minimum 10-year ban.I don’t think we’ve seen the last of Mr. Dutrow.

      • Aunt Bea

        Yeah, all that good stuff said, did you ever once question why an anonymous source would call in a “tip” to the NYSRWB that there were syringes in a certain desk drawer at a time he was out of town? Isn’t that a somewhat dubious circumstance that shouldn’t be taken “at face value”?

        • nu-fan

          Aunt Bea:  Why is it that when I click on your profile, it pops up another name, Lance Armswrong?  Just wondering…

      • Dave

        You believe in the principle of due process, unless it’s some schlub in Oklahoma who’s racing while he continues to exhaust all legal options at his disposal. Seems to me you are talking out of both sides of your mouth on two very similar stories in Oklahoma. Which is it Ray – should we persecute them during the process or give them the benefit of doubt while the legal system runs its course? You argue from a point of convenience; you can’t have it both ways.

        • RayPaulick

          Dave,
          I believe there is a big difference between a trainer like Jeffrey Heath Reed who has been suspended 21 years for four Class 1 positives (dermorphin) and a trainer who has received an extraordinary suspension for violations of much less significance.

          I liken it to someone being allowed to be free on bail while appealing a crime. The most serious crimes do not merit someone being allowed out on bail while appealing, while those convicted of lesser felonies may be freed while appealing.

          It would surprise me if you didn’t see the difference.

          • Dave

            I do see and appreciate the difference Ray; I just don’t agree with your analogy. You should know there is no degree to which a trainer is guilty of a medication violation – he either gave his horse something illegal or he didn’t. That is the very essence of the absolute insurer rule. All violators and violations should be treated the same, which is the way regulatory bodies approach such incidents. One Class 1 drug isn’t any more heinous or grotesque than another, regardless of how insideous you think a particular medication may be. My original position was that your stance on the matter seems to waffle depending on your subject. I find it interesting you want to protect the right of due process for a trainer (Dutrow) with multiple years of repeated problems and dozens of violations, while you are quick to judge and vilify a small-time trainer on a minor circuit with one episode of multiple positives. Why don’t you chase down, skewer and hold accountable the NYRA Stewards with the same enthusiasm you exhibited to the Will Rogers Downs official? I personally think what goes on in New York is a lot more pertinent than what transpires at one of the most modest racetracks in existence. Or is it just easier to be self-rightous, indignant and offended when dealing with someone on the lowest rung of the sport?I totally agree with your position of allowing due process to run its course in all legal proceedings. Unlike you, however, I feel everyone should be entitled to that right, and that the judicial process should be uniformly followed in all matters of medication violations.

      • Aunt Bea

        Let’s not mistake this situation, Ray. You brought this on. Yourself.

        • No Penalties in Horse Racing

          Give it up Uncle Bea

      • Aunt Bea

        Yeah that was a moment of sane editorial comment, and I remember being quite surprised by it. It really differed from the previous numerous comments of yours that he was guilty of 72 medication violations!!! that you knew was a false and misleading statement.

        • RayPaulick

          Aunt Bea…Please find any reference I have made to Rick Dutrow having 72 medication violations.

          http://www.paulickreport.com/news/ray-s-paddock/dutrow-s-lengthy-list-of-violations/

          In the list of his violations (above) the my introduction to the list read as follows: 

          Back when the Paulick Report was just getting started in June 2008, we took a look at the lengthy list of various racing commission rulings involving trainer Rick Dutrow, who at the time was basking in the glory of Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Big Brown. The list, courtesy of the Association of Racing Commissions International, demonstrates the range of violations that Dutrow was alleged to have committed: forged checks; failure to conduct his business in a proper manner; violating claiming rules; being the aggressor in an altercation; omitting a criminal conviction on a license applications; providing false/misleading information about a workout; and multiple drug violations on himself and his horses.

  • Aunt Bea

    My take on the deal Ray, is that after Eight Belles broke down in the KY Derby that Big Brown won, YOU were the loudest voice that Rick Dutrow epitomized everything that was wrong with racing.
    Unrelenting, a constant barrage; soon thereafter, Ed Martin steps in, calling for a 10 yr ban. KY instantly denies him a license, as do some other states.
    I hope you’re happy with yourselves, as it’s all a bunch of ****ing nonsense that keeps you all patting each other on the back for Saving Racing. Good job, Ray, keep pocketing the money.

  • RayPaulick

    Yes, I’ve been terribly critical of Rick Dutrow, as in this Oct. 17, 2011 piece:

    http://www.paulickreport.com/n
    I’m no fan of Dutrow, but I also believe in the principles of due process. The courts will decide whether or not his rights to due process were violated by the New York State Racing and Wagering Board’s decision to revoke his license for a minimum of 10 years.  Monday, Dutrow was granted a 30-day stay of the punishment, meaning he can continue training in New York while the process shifts to the courts.There are so many flaws in racing’s regulatory process it’s almost impossible to know where to begin in a critique of it. There is the lack of uniformity from one state to another, an absence of progressive penalties for habitual violators, too many wrist-slap penalties that fail to deter medication cheaters, an appeals process that has made a mockery of the system. Regulators in one state fail to look at a licensee’s record in other states when considering penalties for rule violations. In other words, you can be considered a first-time offender in Kentucky though you’ve had 20 medication violations in another state. The issue of reciprocity is also in question: after the Dutrow ruling, the California Horse Racing Board issued a statement saying he would not be able to train there, but what about New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Florida, Louisiana or other states?It all makes you wonder if racing wouldn’t be better off if federal legislation were written to create a national governing body (something, incidentally, I think the Dutrow ruling was designed to prevent).As for the Dutrow case, I’m not really sure what makes him that much different from any other repeat offender that merited this type of ban. As much as I want to see habitual cheaters thrown out of the sport, I think the cart may have gotten ahead of the horse here. Wouldn’t it be more prudent to first write rules that leave no doubt in a licensee’s mind about the possible sanctions he or she faces with repeat violations? New York officials threw the book at Dutrow, even though we’re not sure what’s really in that book, and I think that hurts the chances of the ruling being sustained in the courts.The two violations that were the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back in the Dutrow matter involved butorphanol and xyzaline (syringes with said drug were found in his barn). In Maryland, a butorphanol positive netted a trainer a 30-day suspension for a positive post-race test, and a xyzaline positive in Pennsylvania resulted in a disqualification and $1,500 fine for the trainer.  Dutrow got a $50,000 fine and a minimum 10-year ban.I don’t think we’ve seen the last of Mr. Dutrow.

  • nu-fan

    Tinky:  In some cases that is true, especially when politics gets involved as well as economics.  But, there have been some big players on Wall Street that have been indicted.   While it may seem like there is an inequity in justice, at times, it is important to not paint with too broad a brush.  Lastly, I have worked for large corporations as well as known about our competitors who were constantly reviewed by every governmental agency known to mankind and fines (heavy ones at that) were levied far more often than ever made the news.  Also, lawsuits by individuals rarely target the small businesses.  They go after the deep pockets.  I’m not getting into a discussion on the drug war.  Too many are involved.  That war was lost a long time ago.   And, that, Tinky is what real life is about.  And, your comment about universities shows a deep disrespect for education.  Why?  Hmm?  Why, Tinky?

  • nu-fan

    Tbhorseman:  What do you see as a solution?  I understand your comment and it, frankly, makes sense.  But, what do you see as a solution for this?  I’ve read comments from other trainers who have expressed similar viewpoints as yours.  They play by the rules and get penalized while others get away with everything but the kitchen sink. 

  • Aunt Bea

    Yeah, all that good stuff said, did you ever once question why an anonymous source would call in a “tip” to the NYSRWB that there were syringes in a certain desk drawer at a time he was out of town? Isn’t that a somewhat dubious circumstance that shouldn’t be taken “at face value”?

  • betty

    You know whats the kicker here when Willie Beaman came to Remington Park he arrived with Dutrows name on the webbing and buckets and Dutrows groom.

  • betty

    You know whats the kicker here when Willie Beaman came to Remington Park he arrived with Dutrows name on the webbing and buckets and Dutrows groom.

  • La Paloma

    Excellent reporting. There are a lot “small time trainers” getting out of the business because they cannot compete and win, not because of skill or stock, but rather because there is no level playing field. As a new comer I have been told favoritism is inherit to the sport. To aspire to that level is to pay your dues, close your eyes, turn your back, and win, win, win(any way you can get away with it/not get caught). Then you can walk in and get the race you want written, get slapped, or better yet the rules given a new interpretation.  I have not yet become jaded and perhaps my naive nature makes me a chump. Things will change with good reporting like your recent articles and the New York Times article, the internet, and the economy.  The betting public will wise up. More so I believe there are a lot of honest and sincere racing officials, trainers, and owners that will not cross cheaters line. Maybe it is just because I am just a hayseed from Oklahoma: home of the Right-Wingers and Bible Thummers. Thank you please continue to educate us.

  • La Paloma

    Excellent reporting. There are a lot “small time trainers” getting out of the business because they cannot compete and win, not because of skill or stock, but rather because there is no level playing field. As a new comer I have been told favoritism is inherit to the sport. To aspire to that level is to pay your dues, close your eyes, turn your back, and win, win, win(any way you can get away with it/not get caught). Then you can walk in and get the race you want written, get slapped, or better yet the rules given a new interpretation.  I have not yet become jaded and perhaps my naive nature makes me a chump. Things will change with good reporting like your recent articles and the New York Times article, the internet, and the economy.  The betting public will wise up. More so I believe there are a lot of honest and sincere racing officials, trainers, and owners that will not cross cheaters line. Maybe it is just because I am just a hayseed from Oklahoma: home of the Right-Wingers and Bible Thummers. Thank you please continue to educate us.

  • Dave

    You believe in the principle of due process, unless it’s some schlub in Oklahoma who’s racing while he continues to exhaust all legal options at his disposal. Seems to me you are talking out of both sides of your mouth on two very similar stories in Oklahoma. Which is it Ray – should we persecute them during the process or give them the benefit of doubt while the legal system runs its course? You argue from a point of convenience; you can’t have it both ways.

  • Tinky

    Which big players on Wall Street have been indicted since the crash of 2008? Please do list them.

    With regard to universities, it depends on one’s perspective. In many respects, American universities have failed in recent decades to educate students to the realities of life. This is due, in part, to the corruption of the process, as, for example, economics is taught by professors who (too often) themselves have been co-opted by monied interests.

    I certainly agree that it is dangerous to point with too broad a brush, but the fact is that large corporations essentially run this country today. They own most politicians through obscene lobbying, and write much of the regulation that is supposed to keep them honest.

    The financial crisis is Exhibit A. The banking industry is MORE concentrated now than it was before the crash. There has been no serious regulation reform (Dodd-Frank is a watered down joke), and the system is MORE fragile now than it was before the ’08 collapse.

    We are inexorably headed for another, even bigger crisis, and the American public apparently won’t begin to wake up until things get really bad.

  • RayPaulick

    Dave,
    I believe there is a big difference between a trainer like Jeffrey Heath Reed who has been suspended 21 years for four Class 1 positives (dermorphin) and a trainer who has received an extraordinary suspension for violations of much less significance.

    I liken it to someone being allowed to be free on bail while appealing a crime. The most serious crimes do not merit someone being allowed out on bail while appealing, while those convicted of lesser felonies may be freed while appealing.

    It would surprise me if you didn’t see the difference.

  • Aunt Bea

    Let’s not mistake this situation, Ray. You brought this on. Yourself.

  • nu-fan

    Aunt Bea:  Why is it that when I click on your profile, it pops up another name, Lance Armswrong?  Just wondering…

  • nu-fan

    Tinky:  Didn’t know you wanted to limit this to only 2008.  Changed the parameters did you?  But, some of the Wall Street and industry leaders who have been toppled in “recent” years are:  Dennis Koslowski, Jeff Skilling, Bernard Ebgers, Kenneth Lay, Andrew Fastow, Bernie Maddoff…..  In banking, unfortunately, there haven’t been any that I can think of this moment.  But, they did follow the rules.  Perhaps, it is the leadership of this country who made those rules that need to be reviewed for not doing a better job with the financial industry.   But, regardless, you really might want to consider taking some anger-management classes.  I’ve seen more than one of your comments in recent weeks and they are hostile toward far too many of the readers.  And, nothing like blaming everyone else for your woes.  If we are headed for another crisis, there are plenty of people to blame and the public cannot exclude themselves.  Many over-extended themselves on material things that they could not afford and, then, expected everyone else to bail them out–including the banks who were granted this opportunity by our elected officials.  Many of these citizens elected some of the politicians who promise the moon and never explain who is going to pay for it.  But, there are too many people who did not get caught up in their indulgences and are surviving quite well–and, do not go around blaming others for their own predicament.  And, I have never had any impression that any of the professors that I knew were anything other than what they were–dedicated.  This discussion is over!

  • LongTimeEconomist

    Don’t forgot that fat Indian and all the other people he was involved with. 

  • Starofthecrop

    Great article Ray. A lot of small time outfits with “good horses” are almost forced to do the program route just for the sake of stalls, location, and surfaces such as turf. If it’s the dead of winter and you have a turf (prospect) horse and you need to go to Tampa, GP, or FG, what do you do if you can’t get stalls? You call a friend that has a stall(s) a run the horse in their name. Pay them the 10% across the board and they get credits for the start(s). Dutrow’s case on the other hand is a pattern of abuse. The owner of Willy B. knew what was going on. Billy Cesare doesn’t even know how to spell nominated. The 10% of the $80K second place money was all he cared about. The fact that Willy B. is entered back in the Discovery H. with Dutrow is an insult to the 3rd to last place finishers of the OK-Derby!

    • Dbthndr

      I train horses in Oklahoma and I think Oklahoma horse racing should be banned forever, with all the frog juice cases that they did nothing about, and then letting the people who were banned from racing at other tracks, run here! The racin commission in Oklahoma are nothing but criminals themselves! I bet in 2 years there will be no little training stables, and racing will be nothing! I really think the owners of these tracks, of which are indian tribes, I think they would love for all of us to quit the business, so then they can just have their casino, and not have to deal with the racing end of it. I think they are trying on purpose to run everybody off!

      • Lindasmith

        If Oklahoma is such a bad place to run why are you there. There are lots of race tracks throughout the country and I’m sure you could find one that meet your high standards.

        • littleguy

          Linda, many of us LIVE in the State of Oklahoma, many have been here before pari-mutuel and before the advent of casino added purses.  The tracks ARE trying to run the little guys out, they make no bones about it.  All most of us want is a fair playing field.  I’m like dbthndr……horse racing $uck$ here.

  • Starofthecrop

    Great article Ray. A lot of small time outfits with “good horses” are almost forced to do the program route just for the sake of stalls, location, and surfaces such as turf. If it’s the dead of winter and you have a turf (prospect) horse and you need to go to Tampa, GP, or FG, what do you do if you can’t get stalls? You call a friend that has a stall(s) a run the horse in their name. Pay them the 10% across the board and they get credits for the start(s). Dutrow’s case on the other hand is a pattern of abuse. The owner of Willy B. knew what was going on. Billy Cesare doesn’t even know how to spell nominated. The 10% of the $80K second place money was all he cared about. The fact that Willy B. is entered back in the Discovery H. with Dutrow is an insult to the 3rd to last place finishers of the OK-Derby!

  • Lou Baranello

    nu-fan, I commend you!

  • Tbhorseman

    How can you justify Dutrow and his numerous violations?  Everyone yells about great a horseman he is.  When the vet bill are larger than the training bill it makes you a drug trainer…

  • Tbhorseman

    First a national governing body with a clear set of rules…

    Some way to have a horse under guard 72 hours prior to a race to stop the drug abuse.

    Limit the number of stalls any one trainer can have at a racetrack.  I think this would take away the leverage the big guys have.

  • No Penalties in Horse Racing

    Give it up Uncle Bea

  • Dbthndr

    I train horses in Oklahoma and I think Oklahoma horse racing should be banned forever, with all the frog juice cases that they did nothing about, and then letting the people who were banned from racing at other tracks, run here! The racin commission in Oklahoma are nothing but criminals themselves! I bet in 2 years there will be no little training stables, and racing will be nothing! I really think the owners of these tracks, of which are indian tribes, I think they would love for all of us to quit the business, so then they can just have their casino, and not have to deal with the racing end of it. I think they are trying on purpose to run everybody off!

  • ValAnn

    Check again,  this incident took place at WRD.  And while the commission is hearing the appeal of the stewards decision, “Tino” Rieger has made it clear that program training IS NOT an issue with him. He does not care who runs the horse or in whose blinkers and silks it wears. Complaints before and after this incident of program training have been ignored or rebuffed by Rieger. Question is, who did these guys not pay off?

  • ValAnn

    Check again,  this incident took place at WRD.  And while the commission is hearing the appeal of the stewards decision, “Tino” Rieger has made it clear that program training IS NOT an issue with him. He does not care who runs the horse or in whose blinkers and silks it wears. Complaints before and after this incident of program training have been ignored or rebuffed by Rieger. Question is, who did these guys not pay off?

  • Cory Patton

    Ray,
         What are your feelings about a national governing body that actually had the chops to require racetracks to ban people who constantly bypass the rule?
     

  • Tinky

    It should have been obvious that I was referring to post-crash, and it is absurd to believe that haven’t none have been indicted because they “followed the rules”. 

    With regard to the tone of any of my posts, that is not relevant to the substance. As it happens I am doing very well personally, and am therefore not blaming anyone for MY predicament. 

    While individuals certainly bear some responsibility, the general population has clearly been abused upon by bad governance, corporate behavior, predatory lending, etc. The system is broken, and the fact that the general population hasn’t yet corrected the problem by throwing the bums out, and replacing them with radically different politicians, does not excuse any of the corrupt behavior.

    Larry Summers and Glenn Hubbard, two ‘educators’ from well known universities, played important roles in helping to create the economic crisis, and in keeping the disastrous status quo in its aftermath.

    There are, of course, many good and dedicated educators out there. But there are also many who have been corrupted by the system, and to be blind to this fact is to invite further systemic problems.

  • Cory Patton

    Ray,
         What are your feelings about a national governing body that actually had the chops to require racetracks to ban people who constantly bypass the rule?
     

  • sad okie

    What did not make the OHRC agenda, were the 16 dermorphin rulings ( positives from APRIL !?!? ) handed out at RP, and refered to the commision for additional penalties. Explain that one

    • Dbthndr

      They have a hearing for one trainer and his assistant to be heard in January thats already been to the stewards for dermorphin. But I know a few other trainers that got bad test on the same, and they were never even called in front of the stewards. one was cought at Will Rogers and his split even came back possitive and he was sure that they were throwing his and others out becous a mistake was made on other test, so they threw them all out. since Oklahoma dont disclose the names of the trainers that get bad test, then the public will not know. as I see it, their is so much fraud twards the public from these Oklahoma racing jurisdictions, its imposible to wager at these tracks! if you particapate at these tracks, your not gambling, you are giving your money away.

      • sad okie

        The agenda for the Jan. commission meeting wont be posted until the 2nd week in Jan. We all hope you’re right.  Okla does disclose the names of trainers that have had rulings ie.  R Sanchez and his brother/assistant are who you are refering to.

      • sillygirl

        We ran third to a horse at wrd in april. We got out purse money but not the okie bred money. why the horse that won got a bad test. its dedember and still no okie money that we earned. stewards wont commet. stoy is the trainer was one  that had frog juice.

  • sad okie

    What did not make the OHRC agenda, were the 16 dermorphin rulings ( positives from APRIL !?!? ) handed out at RP, and refered to the commision for additional penalties. Explain that one

  • Hadrianmarcus

    Kudos to Charles Town for refusing the entry.

  • Hadrianmarcus

    Kudos to Charles Town for refusing the entry.

  • Meownruff

    Small trainers usually use program trainers simply due to economic issues. In most racing jurisdictions an owner/trainer’s license cost $200. If the trainer has a license in their home base (the state they usually run in), and ships to other tracks in other states the cost can be huge. They must license in every state and pay the $200 every time. Further, most tracks in the North stop racing in the fall so it is only a matter of months or 1 race where they must get a license and pay the $200. While I don’t condone a program trainer in any situation a large outfit like Dutrow’s, Pletcher’s or others can certainly afford the fee since they take about 90% of the purse money from small outfits that are struggling to survive. Moreover, the purse money is sometimes won under a cloud of past doping violations so the small trainer gets screwed again. Contrary to popular belief, the large outfits account for only about 10% of the horse population, account for the majority of doping violations, and win about 90% of the purse money! The small outfits are the backbone of this industry and get treated unfairly when compared to the large outfits. Generally speaking, the small outfits struggle to survive while filling races for the large outfits. Most small outfits are scared to speak out about the injustices perpetrated on them and instead chose to keep their mouths shut knowing that they have to beg for stalls when other outfits get everything handed to them. The small outfits are at a huge disadvantage right from the start. If they do happen to get an amazing racehorse it is rare for them to not sell out to the big outfits that will pay a fortune for a stake/Derby perspective. They have that one shot to make their life comfortable so it is a tough decision for them to make. Take for example “Mine That Bird,” who stated his career at Woodbine. The trainer that sold him said the money was just too much to turn down. I can’t blame him for that. When are the racing secretaries and stall management going to balance the industry? Why are the rules and regulations applied to the small outfits while giving the big name trainers preferential treatment? The answer is a National Racing Commissioner who can bypass the alleged bipartisan set-up at the tracks and racing commissioners who own racehorses (some do). Might as well put Lance Armstrong in charge of the drug tests right? It is the same thing.

  • Meownruff

    Small trainers usually use program trainers simply due to economic issues. In most racing jurisdictions an owner/trainer’s license cost $200. If the trainer has a license in their home base (the state they usually run in), and ships to other tracks in other states the cost can be huge. They must license in every state and pay the $200 every time. Further, most tracks in the North stop racing in the fall so it is only a matter of months or 1 race where they must get a license and pay the $200. While I don’t condone a program trainer in any situation a large outfit like Dutrow’s, Pletcher’s or others can certainly afford the fee since they take about 90% of the purse money from small outfits that are struggling to survive. Moreover, the purse money is sometimes won under a cloud of past doping violations so the small trainer gets screwed again. Contrary to popular belief, the large outfits account for only about 10% of the horse population, account for the majority of doping violations, and win about 90% of the purse money! The small outfits are the backbone of this industry and get treated unfairly when compared to the large outfits. Generally speaking, the small outfits struggle to survive while filling races for the large outfits. Most small outfits are scared to speak out about the injustices perpetrated on them and instead chose to keep their mouths shut knowing that they have to beg for stalls when other outfits get everything handed to them. The small outfits are at a huge disadvantage right from the start. If they do happen to get an amazing racehorse it is rare for them to not sell out to the big outfits that will pay a fortune for a stake/Derby perspective. They have that one shot to make their life comfortable so it is a tough decision for them to make. Take for example “Mine That Bird,” who stated his career at Woodbine. The trainer that sold him said the money was just too much to turn down. I can’t blame him for that. When are the racing secretaries and stall management going to balance the industry? Why are the rules and regulations applied to the small outfits while giving the big name trainers preferential treatment? The answer is a National Racing Commissioner who can bypass the alleged bipartisan set-up at the tracks and racing commissioners who own racehorses (some do). Might as well put Lance Armstrong in charge of the drug tests right? It is the same thing.

  • Beknighted

    Indeed Tinky worry not as the discussion does continue. I admire your cynical stoicism….. And by the way i survived several universities despite the “dedicated” professors who all believed they held the intellectual mandate of heaven.

  • Jo Lynn Page

    Sometimes that is true, but sometimes, the regular trainer can not go to that track because the majority of his stable is some where else and you have to send the horse with someone else or to someone else…how are they going to decide which is which..

    • RayPaulick

      Motive.

  • Jo Lynn Page

    Sometimes that is true, but sometimes, the regular trainer can not go to that track because the majority of his stable is some where else and you have to send the horse with someone else or to someone else…how are they going to decide which is which..

  • RayPaulick

    Motive.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000060014659 JoJo Zumwalt

    Another reason for National Horse Racing Commission.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000060014659 JoJo Zumwalt

    Another reason for National Horse Racing Commission.

  • Dave

    I do see and appreciate the difference Ray; I just don’t agree with your analogy.

    You should know there is no degree to which a trainer is guilty of a medication violation – he either gave his horse something illegal or he didn’t. That is the very essence of the absolute insurer rule. All violators and violations should be treated the same, which is the way regulatory bodies approach such incidents. One Class 1 drug isn’t any more heinous or grotesque than another, regardless of how insideous you think a particular medication may be.

    My original position was that your stance on the matter seems to waffle depending on your subject. I find it interesting you want to protect the right of due process for a trainer (Dutrow) with multiple years of repeated problems and dozens of violations, while you are quick to judge and vilify a small-time trainer on a minor circuit with one episode of multiple positives. Why don’t you chase down, skewer and hold accountable the NYRA Stewards with the same enthusiasm you exhibited to the Will Rogers Downs official? I personally think what goes on in New York is a lot more pertinent than what transpires at one of the most modest racetracks in existence. Or is it just easier to be self-rightous, indignant and offended when dealing with someone on the lowest rung of the sport?

    I totally agree with your position of allowing due process to run its course in all legal proceedings. Unlike you, however, I feel everyone should be entitled to that right, and that the judicial process should be uniformly followed in all matters of medication violations.

  • Dave

    I do see and appreciate the difference Ray; I just don’t agree with your analogy.

    You should know there is no degree to which a trainer is guilty of a medication violation – he either gave his horse something illegal or he didn’t. That is the very essence of the absolute insurer rule. All violators and violations should be treated the same, which is the way regulatory bodies approach such incidents. One Class 1 drug isn’t any more heinous or grotesque than another, regardless of how insideous you think a particular medication may be.

    My original position was that your stance on the matter seems to waffle depending on your subject. I find it interesting you want to protect the right of due process for a trainer (Dutrow) with multiple years of repeated problems and dozens of violations, while you are quick to judge and vilify a small-time trainer on a minor circuit with one episode of multiple positives. Why don’t you chase down, skewer and hold accountable the NYRA Stewards with the same enthusiasm you exhibited to the Will Rogers Downs official? I personally think what goes on in New York is a lot more pertinent than what transpires at one of the most modest racetracks in existence. Or is it just easier to be self-rightous, indignant and offended when dealing with someone on the lowest rung of the sport?

    I totally agree with your position of allowing due process to run its course in all legal proceedings. Unlike you, however, I feel everyone should be entitled to that right, and that the judicial process should be uniformly followed in all matters of medication violations.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UYBILIHAIFH2HKEJK43BBFJQCQ Chris

    They have strong assistant trainers at the tracks where they have stables, and at least at Remington Park the assistant is named.  Asmussen, Cody Autry, Danny Pish etc.

  • Tinky

    “I have never had any impression that any of the professors that I knew were anything other than what they were–dedicated.”

    The question is, dedicated to what?

    How many professors in our university system teach their students to question authority? To question the mainstream media? To question orthodox American history? Etc.

    Too few, I’m afraid.

  • Tom

    Hey Ray,  never saw one word written about the recent suspension of Jamie Ness in Delaware (7 days) and in his absence, his wife Mandy was named trainer of his horses.  Talk about the ultimate program trainer and the new way to keep the checks in the family when the real trainer is suspended.  Seems to me that Rick Dutrow needs to get married soon……

  • Tom

    Hey Ray,  never saw one word written about the recent suspension of Jamie Ness in Delaware (7 days) and in his absence, his wife Mandy was named trainer of his horses.  Talk about the ultimate program trainer and the new way to keep the checks in the family when the real trainer is suspended.  Seems to me that Rick Dutrow needs to get married soon……

  • Dbthndr

    They have a hearing for one trainer and his assistant to be heard in January thats already been to the stewards for dermorphin. But I know a few other trainers that got bad test on the same, and they were never even called in front of the stewards. one was cought at Will Rogers and his split even came back possitive and he was sure that they were throwing his and others out becous a mistake was made on other test, so they threw them all out. since Oklahoma dont disclose the names of the trainers that get bad test, then the public will not know. as I see it, their is so much fraud twards the public from these Oklahoma racing jurisdictions, its imposible to wager at these tracks! if you particapate at these tracks, your not gambling, you are giving your money away.

  • Dave

    I do see and appreciate the difference Ray; I just don’t agree with your analogy. You should know there is no degree to which a trainer is guilty of a medication violation – he either gave his horse something illegal or he didn’t. That is the very essence of the absolute insurer rule. All violators and violations should be treated the same, which is the way regulatory bodies approach such incidents. One Class 1 drug isn’t any more heinous or grotesque than another, regardless of how insideous you think a particular medication may be. My original position was that your stance on the matter seems to waffle depending on your subject. I find it interesting you want to protect the right of due process for a trainer (Dutrow) with multiple years of repeated problems and dozens of violations, while you are quick to judge and vilify a small-time trainer on a minor circuit with one episode of multiple positives. Why don’t you chase down, skewer and hold accountable the NYRA Stewards with the same enthusiasm you exhibited to the Will Rogers Downs official? I personally think what goes on in New York is a lot more pertinent than what transpires at one of the most modest racetracks in existence. Or is it just easier to be self-rightous, indignant and offended when dealing with someone on the lowest rung of the sport?I totally agree with your position of allowing due process to run its course in all legal proceedings. Unlike you, however, I feel everyone should be entitled to that right, and that the judicial process should be uniformly followed in all matters of medication violations.

  • sad okie

    The agenda for the Jan. commission meeting wont be posted until the 2nd week in Jan. We all hope you’re right.  Okla does disclose the names of trainers that have had rulings ie.  R Sanchez and his brother/assistant are who you are refering to.

  • Mike Causey

    I would just like to thank Ray and his staff for the continual coverage of these issues. No other media outlet is even attempting to keep up with the issues that are killing our sport. And in the blogs there are genuine people, some nuts to but, some great comments on the reality of what is really happening in racing. And with over 40 years in racing believe me we are only touching the tip of the problem. If I have a criticism of Ray it is that sometimes his comments are too reserved. Thanks again Ray and please keep up the good work.

  • Mike Causey

    I would just like to thank Ray and his staff for the continual coverage of these issues. No other media outlet is even attempting to keep up with the issues that are killing our sport. And in the blogs there are genuine people, some nuts to but, some great comments on the reality of what is really happening in racing. And with over 40 years in racing believe me we are only touching the tip of the problem. If I have a criticism of Ray it is that sometimes his comments are too reserved. Thanks again Ray and please keep up the good work.

  • Aunt Bea

    Yeah that was a moment of sane editorial comment, and I remember being quite surprised by it. It really differed from the previous numerous comments of yours that he was guilty of 72 medication violations!!! that you knew was a false and misleading statement.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    Maybe Ray paulick Need to pay more attention the same issue came up when dutrow entered horses in Kentucky.  Judge ruled  on owners behalf and owners were allowed to run  under another trainers name.  Again  lets pay attention to the rules  not the idiots paying off reporters to put out bad stories. LOL  

    • Dbthndr

      When will you pay attention to the rules, way it sounds, you have a different rule book!! cant wait til January to hereall this B.S!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    Maybe Ray paulick Need to pay more attention the same issue came up when dutrow entered horses in Kentucky.  Judge ruled  on owners behalf and owners were allowed to run  under another trainers name.  Again  lets pay attention to the rules  not the idiots paying off reporters to put out bad stories. LOL  

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    Yeah Well   Rick Dutrow is going to suprise all of you with something coming out  by january.  All you critics are going to eat your bad words about him. The Rats in NY racing are going to be exposed. 

    • Dbthndr

      Hes had plenty of time to make everybody eat their words, and i dont think they would be giving you all their secrets to be spreadig on this page if he has to wait til January to reveal them!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    Yeah Well   Rick Dutrow is going to suprise all of you with something coming out  by january.  All you critics are going to eat your bad words about him. The Rats in NY racing are going to be exposed. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    Aunt Bea  More to come on this issue new things have been revealed and the person who planted them has been exposed  we are just waiting for the wheels of justice to turn.  AND YE

    • Dbthndr

      How many years does it take for these new things to get revealed?? Just enough time for him to pay people off, and munipulate the system like you claim the commission is doing to him! If you get a bad test, your guilty, period….stop being stupid!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    Aunt Bea  More to come on this issue new things have been revealed and the person who planted them has been exposed  we are just waiting for the wheels of justice to turn.  AND YE

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    funny thing  rick has numerous lasix overages  now that the state vets are adminstering them  its no longer a violation for the trainer  HMMMMMMM   

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    funny thing  rick has numerous lasix overages  now that the state vets are adminstering them  its no longer a violation for the trainer  HMMMMMMM   

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    He is a Great horsemen  over 1800 starts without a breakdown. Dam  didnt Micheal Gill average 5 per week. Again  get your head out of your  butt and pay attention to the facts. People were payed off to set rick up with the needles. All will be exposed  begining of the year. YOU will be suprised who actually gave the order.  But again  as we like to bury rick let us not forget the people who talk about rick so bad while themselves having such a drug problem that they got kicked off there job  cause they were to much of a screw up. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/Aggadancool Danny Gonzalez

    He is a Great horsemen  over 1800 starts without a breakdown. Dam  didnt Micheal Gill average 5 per week. Again  get your head out of your  butt and pay attention to the facts. People were payed off to set rick up with the needles. All will be exposed  begining of the year. YOU will be suprised who actually gave the order.  But again  as we like to bury rick let us not forget the people who talk about rick so bad while themselves having such a drug problem that they got kicked off there job  cause they were to much of a screw up. 

  • http://www.winnerscirclepartners.com/ Stewart Nickel

    Danny,

    Decaf is a safe alternative that has the same flavor as regular…just saying.

  • http://www.winnerscirclepartners.com/ Stewart Nickel

    Danny,

    Decaf is a safe alternative that has the same flavor as regular…just saying.

  • Francis Bush

    Horse racing has been full of these shenaigans for years. Reminds one of dealing with a used car dealership. Its unlikely that these so-called tricks will disappear with time.

  • Francis Bush

    Horse racing has been full of these shenaigans for years. Reminds one of dealing with a used car dealership. Its unlikely that these so-called tricks will disappear with time.

  • Dbthndr

    How many years does it take for these new things to get revealed?? Just enough time for him to pay people off, and munipulate the system like you claim the commission is doing to him! If you get a bad test, your guilty, period….stop being stupid!!!

  • Dbthndr

    Hes had plenty of time to make everybody eat their words, and i dont think they would be giving you all their secrets to be spreadig on this page if he has to wait til January to reveal them!

  • Dbthndr

    When will you pay attention to the rules, way it sounds, you have a different rule book!! cant wait til January to hereall this B.S!

  • Lindasmith

    If Oklahoma is such a bad place to run why are you there. There are lots of race tracks throughout the country and I’m sure you could find one that meet your high standards.

  • nu-fan

    Tbhorseman:  Thank you for your reply.  I don’t know enough to comment about the number of stalls but I definitely have to agree with your first two suggestions.  There should be a standard set of rules, nationally, for horseracing since horses do cross state lines for this purpose.  It almost seems as if each racing jurisdiction is operated as a form of a fiefdom and stuck in the middle ages.  And, regardless of what some people in the industry may think, where there is money involved, there are some who are corrupt enough to try to alter the racing outcome.  For the amount of money invested in owning/training a horse, I would think a few dollars more spent in having my own security staff and video surveillance is just being smart.  By the way, I have not seen very much in the way of any information about those, who have participated in “serious” illegal activities, serving jail time.  Just some suspensions.  I don’t get that.  Need severe consequences for serious infractions.  At least, that’s my opinion. 

  • Jmgstables

    The facts are not straight in this article.  This filly Bring Her Home was in my custody and and training supervised on a daily basis in my barn from the day she arrived at Remington park.  I saddled her in all three outs, yet to my dismay I was actually fined for a “trainers responsibility” infraction

    • http://www.winnerscirclepartners.com/ Stewart Nickel

      Come on man…are you saying you received full commission for the purses won?

  • Jmgstables

    The facts are not straight in this article.  This filly Bring Her Home was in my custody and and training supervised on a daily basis in my barn from the day she arrived at Remington park.  I saddled her in all three outs, yet to my dismay I was actually fined for a “trainers responsibility” infraction

  • http://www.winnerscirclepartners.com/ Stewart Nickel

    Come on man…are you saying you received full commission for the purses won?

  • littleguy

    Linda, many of us LIVE in the State of Oklahoma, many have been here before pari-mutuel and before the advent of casino added purses.  The tracks ARE trying to run the little guys out, they make no bones about it.  All most of us want is a fair playing field.  I’m like dbthndr……horse racing $uck$ here.

  • sillygirl

    We ran third to a horse at wrd in april. We got out purse money but not the okie bred money. why the horse that won got a bad test. its dedember and still no okie money that we earned. stewards wont commet. stoy is the trainer was one  that had frog juice.

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