Oaklawn Diaries: Shoe Polish, Daredevils, and Broken Bones

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Keiber Coa celebrates first win Keiber Coa celebrates first win

While jockey traditions and experiences might be fairly universal, the inside of each jocks’ room is filled with stories and experiences that are unique. At Oaklawn Park, riders are getting ready for the serious business of Saturday’s top-notch card, led by the Rebel Stakes, an important Kentucky Derby prep.

But in this edition of Oaklawn Diaries with Ray Paulick and Scott Jagow, a few members of the jockey colony took some time to reminisce about their one-of-a-kind livelihoods.

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  • Eddie Donnally

    Nice piece Ray. About those dreams of yours to be a jockey. You’d probably make a good one except your polnt of view about most things would probably get you a lot of hot water with trainers. I have a photo of me, after my horse fell one night at Penn National,where the lights went off in two races I was riding, with me on my tail on a muddy track sliding across the finish line in front of my fallen but still sliding mount. It’s funny about riders and broken bones. Usually their lone list is ended with the comment, “But I was lucky,” and the most significant thing about my career was that I lived through it.
    I think my memoir, “Ride The White Horse: One Checkered Jockey’s Story of Racing, Rage and Redemption,” which will be on Amazon and others in mid-June depicts what it is really like to be jockey who required 20 years to win about a 1,200 races.
    Ray, about your new career, remember one thing: Nobody loves a fat jockey.

  • Don Reed

    “Ride The White Horse: One Checkered Jockey’s Story of Racing, Rage and Redemption”

    Eddie, sounds great – everything but the word “redemption,” which has been beaten to death.

    Consider revising the title. Usually, when this occurs, a better title – YOUR title, not borrowed from anything or anyone else’s story – will surface, to your delight.

    Please post this message again when the book becomes available, as a reminder. Thanks.

  • tony ciulla

    hey eddie howie winter says hi

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