Commentary: ‘People Don’t Listen To The Horses Anymore’

by | 02.14.2017 | 6:37pm
Spectacular Bid, Hall of Fame racehorse trained by Buddy Delp, pictured at Claiborne Farm in 1981
Spectacular Bid, Hall of Fame racehorse trained by Buddy Delp, pictured at Claiborne Farm in 1981

Pajeen Delp grew up in her Hall of Fame-father's shed row, walking hots and learning the business from the ground up. Just before her father, Buddy Delp, passed away in 2006, he told her he would hate to be in the horse racing industry today, according to theracingbiz.com. Eleven years later, during which she trained on her own for two years, Delp has decided that her father was right, because “people don't listen to the horses anymore.”

“I had the privilege to come up under a Hall of Fame trainer that ALWAYS put the horse first,” she explained. “For the past few years I have worked for people whose standard of horsemanship wasn't what I was accustomed to, and I became frustrated and disheartened. It became a pattern, and recently I began studying that pattern. In the 21 years I have been working in the racing industry, I have noticed a steady decline, one becoming exponentially worse the past few years.

“My forte is soundness, and diagnosing what's wrong with a horse and how to treat it,” continues Delp. “I was taught that to train, you have to know how to diagnose. But in recent years, I've seen horses run that weren't sound, that had lung infections – that should not have been in a race but were.”

Read more of Delp's explanation for leaving the racing industry at theracingbiz.com.

  • smitty

    I wonder if she still uses saftey pins on her bandages?

    • Larry Ensor

      Actually they still have their place. I grew up tearing wraps of various widths depending on need and purpose from broadcloth cotton flannel. And learned the reasons why and how to wrap a proper bandage. And the reason for “pinning” in two different places.

      The same still holds true today. That’s not to say I don’t use the synthetic with Velcro ends at times.

      • johnnyknj

        I think Smitty was referring to the infamous safety pin Bid supposedly stepped on the day of the Belmont.

        • rhdelp

          You could have left out the words infamous and supposedly in your explanation.

          • johnnyknj

            Supposedly – ok, if you say so. But infamous is accurate whether he stepped on it or not.

        • Larry Ensor

          Fair enough and good for a chuckle.

      • Wayne

        I wonder how many of these folks have a clue what your talking about. Rubbing horses ain’t what it used to be. Now you call the vet and give them a shot instead of cold water and “hands on” care. Not many of the old timers to teach that anymore.

        • No kidding, rubbing legs was as relaxing for me as it was the horses. Do that for a few years and you don’t need the lugwrench to change a tire

    • rhdelp

      Your comment is exactly what is so wrong in this culture….. anonymous nastiness.

    • Leslie Navarro

      Probably with white flannel!

  • Scot Morley

    These old horse people are very few today, Richard Mandella,
    Neil Drysdale… Are the few I trust very few of them.

    • rhdelp

      I agree and love to see them win.

    • Bluetree

      Agree. I’d add Dave Hofmans to the list as well. Funny story, about ten years ago I went to Mandella’s barn on an errand. Training hours were over so the barn was quiet except for a farrier working on a bay gelding (The Tin Man, it turned out). After walking around fruitlessly looking for him, the farrier stood upright and put the horse’s foot down. It was Mandella doing his own shoeing! No, you don’t see that too often. I also picked up some fresh hoof trimmings and can honestly say I fed a G1 winner to my dog.

    • Evelyn Waugh

      Billy Turner

  • Judoon

    Her new career is bartending, as it says in the link? Okay, then.

    • rhdelp

      My daughter skipped grade 12 to attend university due to her SAT scores at 16. She speaks fluent Spanish and French some Italian. Bartending in order to survive financially at this point is admirable with her education and multiple talents.

    • Den Jay

      One has to pay the bills, some have a knack for it but i would hate the thought of dealing with so many people who were drunk.A difficult way to earn a $.

      • Lehane

        I get a sense that you resent Pajeen explaining the reasons for her decision to walk away from racing.

        • Den Jay

          Well you are wrong. She has never been a licenced trainer and then she moans about about other trainers. She misses the horsemanship they use to have in the old days and how a lot today don’t do that. Hello….She is 33 years old she is just thinking she is her Father.She has never trained…

          • Chris

            Den Jay, your ignorance is impressive, not nearly as impressive as your training stats though. Whats even more impressive is that you heard this girl moaning about other trainers..I don’t think I’m alone In saying that I didn’t hear the moaning..do you think that not only is this girl not a licensed trainer, she is also delusional at 33 years of age, thinking she is her father? And you can say that she has never trained..because she doesn’t have a trainers license? Are you aware of how many “trainers” have a license and have never trained a horse? HELLO!

          • Den Jay

            You know of my training stats….My you are gifted, stop blowing hot air…

          • Chris

            The hot air is your training stat, Genius..Hello!

          • Chris

            I apologize for my ignorance Den Jay, I just realized this is about schematics. To be CALLED a trainer you need to have a LICENSE (*se) And so it seems according to you, No one is eligible to be CALLED a trainer unless they have passed the required test and had their name printed on paper as such..which then and only then are they allowed to state their opinions regarding the industry validly..because unless your name is printed on paper, (obviously having aquired said license), you cannot train a horse and therefore cannot CALL yourself a trainer. I get it now :-)

          • igallop

            lololololo hahahha….ayup. AND if you sell carpets on monday (or matresses) and pass that trainers test on tuesday then lo and behold! A trainer you are!

          • Den Jay

            HELLLO! To be called a trainer one needs a TRAINERS LICENCE….

    • FastBernieB

      My college educated son, after graduation, spent 2 weeks in bartending school and is now 25 years into a bartending career that I vehemently opposed. Fortunately, I have come to realize that this was the right choice for him. He works in an upscale environment, earns a 6 figure income and enjoys going to work. Don’t knock bartending.

  • Den Jay

    Always a little eye brow raising when you get someone who hasn’t trained in their own right starts talking about what other trainers are doing wrong…She makes a valid point in regards to some just going for money.Though she states something similar to ‘ when i was taught to train’ . An assistant is just that and not a trainer. So i can see a few trainers with decades experience raising an eyebrow to a 33 yo who has never trained… A son or daughter of a good or great trainer means nothing.

    • rhdelp

      Perhaps you haven’t read the entire article her win percentage was stellar when she trained, most of the horses wouldn’t have made the races with the problems they had but with patience and dilegence put them in the winners circle. I have observed a trainer she worked for recently and was appalled, repelled by his decisions or lack of them for good reasons. I had great compassion for his owners while watching him abuse their trust and money. The foal crop has been decreasing and many people who could afford to own horses lower to mid level have been compromised financially since 2008. You are correct many assistants do not make good trainers but I do believe assistants such as Bill Mott/Jack Van Berg, Todd Pletcher/ Wayne Lucas have been successful. No a son or daughter of a Hall of Fame trainer may not have a clue about the business but this daughter does.

      • Den Jay

        I was going by another comment on here during her 2 year training stint.Someone stated that she was with her brother and he was the Licenced trainer. Recently here our rules have changed where you can have co-trainers.Previously here what you would call an assistant trainer would be a foreman or PC foreperson.

        • rhdelp

          They worked as a team only one could be licenced.

          • Lehane

            A team who were well educated in the equine and put the welfare of the horse first. What a wonderful legacy their father left them. What a terrible loss to the racing industry.

    • Richard Holmes

      I have no idea whether she would be a good head trainer. Some good assistant trainers go out on their own and become great trainers. But there are also some assistants out there who are great assistant trainers but not good trainers on their own. They are good at spotting things and reporting to their boss, but not great at knowing what course of action to take on their own. So I have no idea whether Pajeen would make a good head trainer. But I think whether she would be a good head trainer is irrelevant in evaluating her opinion. There is no reason to think her opinion is not good. She has been a trainer for a long time. I think she is qualified to give her opinion on what she sees in day to day training these days. And I think what she says is spot on.

      • Den Jay

        I wouldn’t say irrelevant. After all one see’s very few very successful trainers in their late 20’s early 30’s.Yes it happens but far outweighed by older trainers as it is an art that takes so long to learn.

        • Richard Holmes

          My point was that you don’t have to be a great trainer to have a good, informed opinion. If somebody has worked on the backside for 20 years, they are going to have a pretty good idea what is going on. I know nothing about Pajeen, so I have no idea how good of a trainer she is. But whether she is good or not, she definitely has enough experience to give an informed opinion on the state of training and trainers in America today.

          • Den Jay

            Richard i think you have to have trained in your own right if you want to pick fault with a good % of trainers.History will show she has never trained, history up until now won’t show her as a licenced horse trainer. Foreman or assistant is far removed from the realities, pressures and expectations of the ( head) trainer. She may very well be a good horseperson, though my point is some who have spent a life time training may say ‘ you have never been a licenced trainer and you are telling us what we are doing wrong’…

          • Richard Holmes

            I completely disagree with you. She has worked for several different trainers, including HOF trainers such as her dad. She knows what’s going on. She is very qualified to give her opinion. But you don’t even have to be an expert on something to have an informed opinion. I will give you an example. I’m not a doctor and I’m not in the medical field. But I can still often times tell you if a guy is a good doctor or not. I’m sure you’ve been to at least one doctor in your life who you would not go back to, because you didn’t feel they were very good. Sometimes you don’t even need to be an expert at something to see that someone is doing a poor job.

            But going back to the original topic, I think that exercise riders and assistant trainers who have worked for several trainers, are usually excellent judges of who the best trainers are. They can tell you who they learned a lot from, who was competent, who was incompetent, etc.

          • Den Jay

            Let’s see what the point she is making. She is basically saying she can do a better job and a lot of them don’t know as much as her…Someone who has never held a trainers licence.Let me tell you i have known a couple of Very good Jockeys who had a life time around horses and won plenty of Group 1’s. The didn’ t make trainers at all one of them couldn’ t train a frog to hop or a lion to eat meat let alone a horse…Yet some others excel. My Father trained for 50 years, my Brother was a Jockey and rode for almost 35 years. When my Brother retired , he was a good rider and horseman and then took up training. He was the first to admit he had a lot to learn and made plenty of mistakes.Training is in a different league again.

          • Larry Sterne

            That’s because he was never under a horse. Jockeys rarely make good trainers it is like asking a NASCAR driver to be a mechcanic. With 18 years experience under the horse all she has to gain is the smoozing of clients (owners) and the bookkeeping which I bet she can. If owner wants to be pampered maybe that not a good owner fit for her and she can get owner w stronger ego.

          • Tinky

            Actually, jump riders typically make the transition to training with far greater success than flat riders, and it shouldn’t be a surprise.

          • Den Jay

            Wrong , worked around the horses in the stable for many years not only on top of them.

          • Richard Holmes

            You totally misunderstood her point. Her point wasn’t that she is a much better trainer than most trainers. Her point was that she hates the direction that things have moved over the years. Nowadays many of the horses are practically being trained by the vet. The vet looks at the horses first thing in the morning, decides what is bothering them, and then injects whatever area is bothering them.

            You missed my point too. I’m not saying that jockeys make good trainers. I think most jockeys know who the good trainers are. Jockeys and exercise riders are qualified to tell you which trainers they think are competent and which trainers are incompetent. That doesn’t mean these jockey or exercise riders would necessarily make good trainers. It just mean that they are qualified to give an informed opinion about trainers.

          • L.L. Kauffman

            Inteiigent comment about doctors, and I agree. As for horse trainers, if you go with a “big” trainer with multiple divisions in several states, you had better make sure the foreman is a good horseman, because that is who is overseeing your horse.

          • igallop

            Yes I completely agree with you Mr. Holmes. A good competent exercise rider is one of the most valuable members of the trainers team. And I can’t quite understand what Den Jay is trying to say here. He seems to put “long time” trainers on a pedestal. Well the truth of the matter is (Mr. Den) that some exercise riders know ten times more than the “long time” trainer knows about a horse. And he/she doesn’t need to be the one signing the checks to understand about pressure. So Please dont wax on about the stresses and pressures a trainer experiences over assistants and foremen. A team is a team and in many cases we ALL feel the stress. I know from experience as I have worked with the top tier trainers of the world to the worst of them and everyone in between. So I can safely say that you are mistaken in thinking that trainers are the only ones who know what it’s all about. As a matter of fact I know plenty “long time” trainer that have NO business having a license. It doesn’t take a “long time trainer “as you say to be qualified to accurately tell it like it is in racing today. I find it interesting that you would say any negative comments about Ms Delp knowing her background. I do believe you might be the only one.

          • Den Jay

            Come back when you know what you are talking about…

          • Chris

            As if you do? You seem to be so hung up on the fact that she isn’t a “licensed trainer” and implying therefore she has no right to an opinion..I wonder how many unlicensed trainers there are out there (ky, fl, md etc) that are training these horses to get to the racetracks, into the hands of Licensed Trainers? Being a trainer on the racetrack and being a horseman are two entirely different things and it’s surprising to me after reading about how much horse experience there is in your family that you are not aware of this. Maybe your father, the trainer of fifty years actually knew the horses he was training, and trained them himself. If you consider how many horses these top echelon Licensed Trainers have in their stables, how is it even physically possible that they are the ones training the horses?? It’s not..it’s the assistants, the exercise riders, foremans, vets etc training these horses. It takes a team and some players are more valuable than others, like the ones with an “eye” for an injury or the experience of having been raised in a shed row by a HOF trainer (and obviously paying attention while she was there) or having an innate sense of a horses well being on a day to day basis (again, attention being paid). You do not need a License to be a horseman.

          • Den Jay

            Let me enlighten you…You need a licence to be called a trainer…You do realise the coach doesn’t actually play in the Superbowl…
            As for horseman who ride , usually a great horseman is an ordinary Jockey. A lot of the best Jockeys are not the greatest horseman.We are talking racing not the Calgary Stampede…

          • igallop

            Mr. Den Jay, you ought to take your negativity somewhere else. Your not really a good fit for this forum. Your commentary is antagonistic and obnoxious. And I think I speak for most everyone here.

          • Chris

            You certainly speak for me :-)

          • Lehane

            You speak for me too.

          • Chris

            Enlighten me? Lol..U need a license to be “called a trainer”. Wow, what was I doing for those 13 years before I passed a test and got a license? And what am I “Called” now that I have given up my license to train horses on the racetrack because I felt I couldn’t take full responsibility for their everyday care/training (as a Licensed Trainer does, according to you) due to the time consuming job of managing owners and stable help, increased insurance etc.. and thank you for your comment “usually a great horseman is an ordinary jockey”, Just solidifying my point in your ignorance..

          • Lehane

            When i worked in the industry as a groom/strapper one morning one of the best trackwork riders refused to ride a horse for a top trainer. She explained that there was something not right in his near forelimb, he was sore and should be rested. So-called ‘top’ trainer called a male rider over who got on the horse and about 200m along the track this horse broke down in the near (left) forelimb and was euthanased. Owner told it was an unfortunate accident. The female rider walked away from racing and she always knew how a horse was going underneath her, equine educated since she was a young child and one of the best trackwork riders around, a true horsewoman.

          • Larry Ensor

            “Foreman or assistant is far removed from the realities, pressures and expectations of the ( head) trainer.”

            And you know this from experience? If so with/for who?

          • Den Jay

            Yes Larry first hand, my father trained fir 50 years, my brother trained for a lot of years as did i with my eldest brother a Jockey fir 35 years. As for personal info and names that is my business…

          • katwalk

            “the realities, pressures and expectations of the ( head) trainer. ”

            Somehow, I think this goes directly to her point. . . .

        • longtimehorsewoman

          Because they follow the traditional method of learning. Work as a groom, then a foreman, then an assistant trainer. That all takes time. But what the person is learning is the question.

        • Larry Sterne

          She started when she was twelve and now thirty. Or so . 18 years of experience is not a newcomer. If you had 18 years experience at your job would you consider yourself inexperienced?

          • Den Jay

            That doesn’t mean she is any good at it…

          • Lehane

            Clearly she was good at it as her mother pointed out – percentage success rates.

          • Den Jay

            Lehane you know those 12 Melbourne Cup Winners Bart Cummings trained ? Well i trained every one of them Bart just had them in his name… Her Mother seems like a very nice person but my Mother thinks the sun shines out of my ar$e.

    • Larry Sterne

      Decades of experience can many times mean doing the same thing they learned in their first year for decades. You see it all the time.sad.

      • Jim Tom

        In today’s current racing environment experience truly is overrated. If you look at the nation’s leading trainer by wins the past couple of years he was a national leader almost immediately after he took out his trainer’s license and he had no prior experience of any consequence working as an assistant trainer, barn foreman, groom, etc.

    • Fred and Joan Booth

      We have seen assistant trainers who were the trainers in reality, as the assistant trainer performed the entries, saddling, bandaging of the entered or raced horses in the stable. The trainer of record rarely ever was at the racing stable as she was highly allergic to dust and molds present in our winter racing calendar of our state.

  • rhdelp

    I am proud to state I am Pajeen’s mother for many reasons: her character, intelligence, ingenuity, and determination.She skipped grade 12 due to high SAT scores at 16 and went to university. She speaks fluent Spanish, French and some Italian. Pajeen understands the most successful people continually learn through experience and from others throughout their careers. She went to great lengths to accomplish that win percentage with horses that would have been discarded in many barns. Good trainers possess a keen power of observation at all times in every aspect of a horse’s life day and night. The trainer’s responsibility is to make intelligent decisions based on what they observed, how the horse reacted to touch from head to tail, heat or filling in legs, ankles, knees, take care they are shod properly, consult the vet when problem are detected, be thourough and wiley reading the condition book. It is essential to inform the owners with good and bad news when it happens and come to an agreement on how to proceed. Treat the owners horses and their investment wisely like you would you own. Pajeen’s desire is to train horses because she loves it and she’s very good at the art and when training is done well…It is an art. Her old school philosophy is a rarity in 2017. Hope someone will give her the opportunity to shine.

    • Concerned Observer

      It is hard to be observant day and night when the horse is 1 of 100, and 600 miles away.

      • Dumas

        What is really sad is there are very, very well known trainers who can be right there in a shedrow and not even know what horse is in what stall. They don’t have to be more than 6 feet away (let alone 600 miles away) and they still don’t know. I have personally had a very well known trainer lead me to a stall to show me a horse only to have a groom let them know the horse in the stall wasn’t who they told me it was. So very much of what makes trainers successful in the current racing environment is having lots of horse and a good vet – it is not about horsemanship anymore.

        • longtimehorsewoman

          It certainly is not about horsemanship, you are right.

        • Cliff Amyotte

          Why would you leave your horse with a trainer who has 600 other horses? If you want the trainer to know your horse get a smaller trainer who will know your horse makes more sense to me as an owner is the animal not your investment.

          • Dumas

            Where did you read that the referenced trainer had 600 horses? I personally do not know of any trainer with 600 horses (600 was referencing miles).

        • Laura Bronson Holzman

          Paper trainers …the worst kind✔

      • Judy Gaddis

        Maybe trainers need to either have fewer horses in their barns or less dollar signs in their eyes……………..

      • Carla Parrillo

        I understand your side of this….and yet I’m an observer. I watch from my living room 90% of the time. Even with that I can pick up on the body language that the horse sends out. Others on these crews need to add their eyes, heads,and heart a to help the trainers do their work

    • Larry Sterne

      I can see why you are so proud. When you have such high standards it must be uncomfortable to be in barns which don’t care or don’t know how to treat a horse . You feel miserable for the horse and yourself. Surely there is room for such a person as your daughter in one of the more respected barns. Good luck and best wishes.

    • Bo Mitchell

      Amen!!! This sport certainly needs more not less of this type of person and trainer.. God Bless her in her future endeavors. I for one hope that some quality owners come along and hire this young lady to train there horses!

    • Terri Z

      There are still good trainers around that are old school and who put the horse first. And there are some that live in South Florida. If she wants to work in a bar and get back into training, perhaps it’s good if she moves to South Florida; there are plenty of restaurants and bars on the grounds of Gulfstream Park. Also, a lot of experienced horsemen and horse owners work in various capacities at Gulfstream Park. Some worked as assistants for Jack van Berg and now work at the racing office at Gulfstream.

    • Carla Parrillo

      I am relatively new to the race horseing community. I have watch special races since Secretareiat, but stated paying more attention to the special attention the horses needed to stay fit. Then after witnessing tragedies like Southern Bell and Barborough I saw positive changes begin. But, no one, as you have stated listened or listens even now, to the horses.
      Your daughter I wonderful. She is needed in this sport to be an advocate to the horses.
      I’m a novice by far but as I watch from home a see a horse react I know the body language tells me that something is wrong.
      From tongues caught in a toungue tie, or a noise that spooked him. Recently Cal Chrome had two reactions at the gate. The srconbtime was proven he knew sonething was wrong. And last week a derby contender acted up. They blamed it on his attitude. Their was an abscess. Pajeen you are needed I hope you return one day soon.

  • Jbumi

    What a terribly sad statement on the current condition of the sport that a person with such integrity & love of the horses feels their only viable option is to quit the business. 😔

    • Lehane

      Very sad indeed.

      • Carla Parrillo

        …I am loving this discussion. Being one who loves horses, but never owned one. This story only repeats what I said last week.
        Did I not say that they speak to us with their body language. My confidence just went up. Anything I know about animals started a my parents and grandparents. Olad school may be but always works.

  • longtimehorsewoman

    So very true and so very sad. Compounded by the fact that so many think they know horses and are experts doing things right. And if they don’t think they’re doing things right, then most likely those people are cheating.

  • That’s a picture of the bid I have not seen before. One of my favorite horses, I have a grand daughter of his.

    • Wayne

      One of the best racehorses I’ve ever seen. too bad he couldn’t pass that along in the breeding shed.

  • Noelle

    Who has Ms. Delp worked for lately – who are these trainers with the low “standard of horsemanship”? Given our litigious society, I guess she couldn’t name them, but it would be interesting to get their names and take a look at what has gone on with horses in their care.

    Assuming there is a pattern, as Ms. Delp says, some enterprising reporter should “study the pattern” and then report on it, citing abuses and naming names. Not just one scandal at a time – we read about the case of a prominent owner starving horses in upstate NY or a Florida trainer burning the tattoo off a horse’s lip so he can send it to slaughter – these are the most horrific types of cases – but if there is a pattern of lesser abuses that occur under the current media radar, should those also be chronicled?

    • SteveTG

      There’s no question that if horrific cases exist, then lesser abuses most certainly exist (and go unreported). For every bad car crash there are a thousand fender benders. The racing industry is in a compromised state of secrecy because if all the cases of abuse were reported; that is, every time an animal was mistreated however slightly, there would remain no good argument to allow the sport to exist, would there be? Certainly to say some animal abuse is okay, or only a little bit of animal abuse is okay, which is the only justification one can dredge up, is unacceptable to anyone with a functional conscience.

  • Guest

    Ok I know this girl Pajeen from Delaware Pk. I met her and her brother there a few years back they were training a small stable there. They did a good job worked hard tried hard and know the business. If anyone should know horses these 2 do! I don’t care if she ran horses under her brothers name she and her brother were very good with the horses! I read her story it’s true how things are. It’s as she says. She deserved the chance to train some decent horses but then again many owners would rather go to some cheating trainer which she and her brother are not! She like many women trainers do not get the equal deserving credit she should in this business. Many owners have to have the big name trainers it means something to them to have there horse in a 60-80 horse stable where they are a just a number! Go figure that one! I hope she one day is able to have her stable, she deserves it !

    • Den Jay

      Is that you mum….

      • Larry Sterne

        U r being hateful. Good luck in life.

      • Guest

        No I am not her mum sorry. You got that assumption wrong too. Like other statements you got wrong….

  • Den Jay

    Simple fact she has never trained…If she wasn’t his daughter we wouldn’ be hearing from a stable hand….

    • Chris

      That is such an ignorant thing to say

      • Den Jay

        I think you have cornered the market on ignorance…

    • Lehane

      Pajeen has shown courage and dignity in expressing her reasons for the decision she’s made. I would imagine that it’s been disappointing for her to observe training methods contrary to what she was taught by her deservedly famous father.
      I would like to think that Pajeen is also representing others who have experienced similar to her.

  • Den Jay

    I think closer attention needed to be paid…In regards to the person who has worked 30 years though may not have learned anymore than they did on day one…This is true if they died on the 2nd day otherwise an incorrect statement….

  • Guest

    She is more than a stable hand. Little do people know that there are a lot of hidden trainers on the backside that are really training those horses while the big trainer is no where to be found! seen this many times at the track!

    • igallop

      you got that right!

  • m sutton

    My trainer is Paddy Gallagher in Southern California. I have known him almost 15 years and have always found him putting every horse he trains as if they were his own child!! He has always listened to our horse, as a 2 year old after 7 works and during a regular gallop he came up lame when being pulled up from his gallop. Before his rider could get off him to have him vanned off, the horse galloped back to the barn. The rider told the trainer the horse was lame but he showed no signs of injury. The next week he had vets look at the horse and found nothing wrong. He was then sent to Santa Anita for a nuclear scan. The scan just showed he needed to grow up some more so he was sent to a ranch for 3 months. When he returned, he started back into his training as a 3 year old when he came down with colic. He underwent emergency colic surgery in April and did not return to Del Mar until 7-25-16. Since that day, he has not missed one minute of training and will be running his 2nd race tomorrow. I give credit to our trainer for listening to our horse and putting his health over any profits or rushing him back for his own best interest!!!

    • Larry Sterne

      U r lucky. Some trainers r only looking for day money if horse has issues owner never notified for fear of losing the $ know of a supposed ly successful trainer x and had such a horse. Billed owner for re set of shoes 2x and horse got home it was noticed no old nailed holes. HMM this goes on all the time. Without knowledge to improve th e horse or integrity to guide ones life no wonder racing has the reputation of US congress.

    • Carla Parrillo

      I don’t even own a horse, much to my regret, but to have them and care for them as if they are your children, is how it should be. These horses needs you and relies on the trainers for just that type of parental nurturing. Don’t ever lose that quality it will always pay off.

  • Den Jay

    Ok the point i am trying to make in regards to this article…Say a famous football coach from years gone by has a son or daughter in their early 30’s. Say the son says in an article ‘ a lot of the coaches of today just don’t get it’ . ‘ When my well known Father first taught me how to coach it was much better then’ . ‘ I learned how to be a complete coach, doing things and helping the players with things coaches don’t today. ‘ Some coaches push there players too hard and don’t know or care about limiting injuries’. ‘ I coached for 2 years but am now getting out of the industry because i don’ t like and am frustrared by the way things are going ‘. Meanwhile their are coaches reading the article that think hang on kid i have coached teams to championshipsq

  • Den Jay

    Apparently the work riders are getting worse and with her amazing skills one doesn’t have to get a Vet. Her arrogance and over inflated ego is astonishing considering she was only interviewed because her Father trained Spectacular Bid…Which was retired before she was born, never had a trainers licence. Simple she is not as good as she thinks and is bitter because she couldnt make it in the industry.Toughen up princess….

    • Lehane

      Your hostile manner is uncalled for.

    • igallop

      If anyone’s ego in this forum is over inflated it’s your Mr. Den Jay. You are the only one spewing out this negative talk. It seems you are either jealous of Ms. Delp or have a problem with women in racing. All your remarks are way off base and have no merit whatso-ever. You obviously read editorials with blinkers on. Your negativity is really a turn off and only makes you look like an arse

      • Chris

        I absolutely agree with you igallop

    • Guest

      Well first of all I know you don’t know this business’s because you don’t know the language used on the backside! Work riders, that is something racetrack people do not say….. Bingo…..

      • Chris

        Spot on, I am getting the feeling Den Jay is possibly a spurned ex, or worse..how could anyone else speak with such venom about someone he’s never met and as you stated, a business he obviously doesn’t know..

  • Guest

    Her story is not of jealousy or bitterness it is one of truth. I cannot believe people who have this strong wrong opinion when they know nothing of this racehorse business. You see I too grew up in the racehorse world was born and raised in it. I know what it’s like to be up at 4am every single morning 7 days a week and actually work at the barn with the horses! I am a trainer and yes I know this girl too. I find it appalling the bad attitutudes people have against women trainers and especially a small stable that does right by the horse! Too many people believe their horse needs to be with a big name trainer while the smaller good trainers never get a chance yet they can do the job just as good or if not better than these big trainers who don’t even know the names of their horses in the barn! Hard to know the names when the trainer is 600 miles away!! In defense of Pajeen I would say yes she knows the industry knows the business is good with horses, she is not bitter she is telling like it is that’s all……

  • Doug Chambers

    I applaud the Paulick Report for continuing to share stories and reports on matters that are important to the welfare of the horses. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, I’m so impressed because I see little to zero of it elsewhere. May you continue to be recognized as a viable part of the industry, and continue to be rewarded for the good you do.

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